Emails (excerpted), Martha Shara, media relations specialist, Chenega Contractor for the Division of Healthcare Quality and Promotion (DHQP), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, April 28 and May 11, 2017

12:57 p.m.

April 28, 2017

Hi  Gardner: Please find a response to your inquiry.

Please let me know if you have any other questions.

Thanks,

Martha

 

From CDC’s Immunization Safety Office:

Vaccines are a crucial part of ensuring public health, and great lengths are taken to ensure their safety. Please refer to the following link for an overview of vaccine safety and how it is monitored: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/ensuringsafety/monitoring/index.html

 

Please note: A vaccine adverse event is a health problem that happens after a person gets a vaccination. Some adverse events might be caused by the vaccination and others might be coincidental and not related to vaccination. It is generally not possible to determine from VAERS data if a vaccine caused the adverse event. VAERS is used to detect possible safety problems – called “signals” – that may be related to vaccination. If a vaccine safety signal is identified through VAERS, scientists may conduct further studies to find out if the signal represents an actual risk.

 

Like all pharmacologic products, adverse events can occur after receiving a vaccine. The vast majority of the time, these events are minor and self-limiting. In rare cases, they can be more severe.

 

Recognizing this situation, the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA) was passed in 1986. As part of NCVIA, an injury table was developed listing vaccines and their known adverse outcomes; this table is periodically updated. Enclosed for convenience is the most recent injury table. More information is available at the below link:

https://www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation/index.html

 

               Please let us know if we can be of further assistance.

 

 

Martha Sharan

Media Relations Specialist

Chenega Contractor for the Division of Healthcare Quality and Promotion (DHQP)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

From: Selby, Gardner (CMG-Austin

Sent: Friday, April 28, 2017 2:38 PM

 

Was the physician who testified correct that all the following gets recorded in the aftermath of vaccines? If so, to what degree were such incidents recorded in the latest full year of the V collection?

 

My transcript with bolding from me, below:

 

Dr. Magree: So I could break my arm the next day and I can report that to that reporting system. And I want the reporting system, it’s meant to be set up that way because that’s how we can figure out if vaccines cause injury.

We have had cases of vaccines that have been pulled from the market because people have reported into that system; they’ve noticed trends and we’ve pulled vaccines from that market,  most notably, the rotovirus vaccine in the early 2000s. The system works. It works.

 

Rep. Zedler: And when you go down the V report, there’s only one vaccine where more people died due to the disease than--

 

M: --Once again, the Veers report does not have a statement of causality so it’s not saying that those people died from the vaccine.

 

Z: No no no no, are you going to tell me that if somebody got a vaccine, and within hours to days had died, that it’s not due to the vaccine?

 

M: It’s not necessarily due to the vaccine, no, absolutely not. I could have a vaccine and I could get hit by a truck tomorrow and die. I could have a vaccine and I could commit suicide tomorrow and die. I could have a vaccine and have a heart attack tomorrow.

 

Z: Woah, stop, stop. Nobody puts that down.

S: Yes they do…

3:30 p.m.

Attached you will find a document fully detailing the VAERS monitoring system, including the following information:

 

Q1 - Was the physician who testified correct that all the following gets recorded in the aftermath of vaccines?

(taken from the attached document): Anyone can report an adverse event to VAERS, including health-care professionals, vaccine manufacturers, patients, parents and caregivers, and others. Reports are submitted voluntarily either directly from individual reporters, who may be reporting for them-selves or others, or secondarily from vaccine manufacturers, that also receive spontaneous reports and in turn submit them to VAERS. Reporting is encouraged for any clinically important or unexpected adverse event, even if the reporter is not sure if a vaccine caused the event [20]. VAERS accepts all reports without rendering judgment on clinical importance or whether vaccine(s) might have caused the adverse event.

 

Q2 - If so, to what degree were such incidents recorded in the latest full year of the V collection?

VAERS is designed to detect unusual or unexpected patterns of reporting that might indicate a possible safety problem (a safety “signal”) that might require further evaluation. CDC and FDA use various techniques to analyze VAERS data including automated analysis of large volumes of data, looking at reporting trends over time, clinical review of reports, and data mining.

 

Hope this helps…

Thanks,

Martha

 

Martha Sharan

Media Relations Specialist

Chenega Contractor for the Division of Healthcare Quality and Promotion (DHQP)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

From: Selby, Gardner (CMG-Austin)

Sent: Friday, April 28, 2017 4:48 PM

Subject: RE: Following up: MEDIA INQUIRY: Austin American-Statesman

 

The answer on question 2 seems not to be an answer.

3:57 p.m.

We focus on the reports that “signal” a possible safety problem.  

 

Martha Sharan

Media Relations Specialist

Chenega Contractor for the Division of Healthcare Quality and Promotion (DHQP)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

1 p.m.

May 11, 2017

The Green Hulk story is true.