ICS Calendar Title: Vocational Wayfinding

ICS Course Code: ICSD 132502/232502 F16

Instructor: Dr. Gideon Strauss

Term and Year: Fall 2016

Last Updated: September 26, 2016. Note: This is the final version of the syllabus, but there may still be small deviations from the syllabus in the actual course. These will be clearly communicated in the Google Classroom.

1. Course Description

2. Course Learning Goals

3. Course Requirements and Description and Weighting of Elements to be Evaluated

4. Required Readings and Viewings

5. Recommended Readings and Viewings

6. Course Schedule

1. Course Description

“What am I to do with my life?” “Who am I?” There appears to be an inextricable connection between the work that we do and our sense of who we are. As the poet David Whyte has suggested, work is for all of us a pilgrimage of identity. It is not, however, a pilgrimage for which any of us are provided with a GPS device, allowing us to navigate in straight lines with comfortable certainty towards clear career objectives that cohere in obvious ways with an immutable sense of our identity. Instead, this pilgrimage is more like the experience of Polynesian sailors, who traversed the vast expanses of the Pacific Ocean with the help of the stars, memory, and close attention to the patterns of the waves on the surface of the ocean as these reflected features of the ocean (including far-off islands). Polynesian wayfinding was a way of navigating that required alert improvisation and frequent reorientation from within a perpetually shifting context. Our vocational pilgrimages require of us to find our way in a similar manner.

In this course we will explore particular practices, frameworks, and tools, by means of which we can engage in vocational wayfinding. Prompted by our readings we will consider some of the relationships between work and identity: How does my work prompt my discovery of my sense of self? How do I try out possible selves in relation to whatever in the world is calling me toward particular kinds of work? What am I to do with my life? We will give close attention to those passages in our lives (in particular young adulthood and the middle passage of life) when both our work contexts and our experience of our identity are most obviously in flux. In addition, we will consider how to contribute skilful leadership and insightful mentoring to others as they engage in their own vocational wayfinding, particularly in the contexts of the workplace and educational institutions.

There are two ways for participating in this course: for full academic credit (either for an ICS Certificate in Worldview Studies or towards a masters degree) or as a continuing education learning experience. The core readings and viewings and the overall flow of the course for the two ways are similar, but there are significant additional requirements for students taking the course for credit. Secondarily, participants in the continuing education learning experience can do so individually or in a study group. Students taking the course for credit will be able to schedule “office hours” meetings  with the ICS instructor individually via online video (or in person, for students in Toronto and Montreal). Individual participants in the continuing education learning experience and the facilitators of study groups will have opportunities for direct interaction via online video (and in person, for participants in Toronto and Montreal) with the ICS instructor for the course in scheduled group sessions. Other study group participants will be welcome to access recorded video content from the ICS instructor, but will not have direct access to live meetings (in person or via online video). Different fee levels apply for (i) students taking the course for credit, (ii) individual participants in the continuing education learning experience and the facilitators of study groups, and (iii) study group participants.  

2. Course Learning Goals

  1. To become familiar with a number of different approaches to understanding the relationship between work and identity in order to cultivate a personal approach to understanding that relationship;
  2. To assemble a number of frameworks and tools for thinking about work and career in order to be able to both practice vocational wayfinding personally and to be able to provide mentoring and leadership to others in their practice of vocational wayfinding; and
  3. To essay into the practice of both personal vocational wayfinding and providing leadership or mentoring to others in vocational wayfinding in exploratory ways in order to evaluate the frameworks and tools presented in this course against personal experience and to develop a personal plan for continued learning (after the completion of this course) with regard to the concerns emerging from such an evaluation.

3. Course Requirements and Description and Weighting of Elements to be Evaluated

Note: These requirements are for those students taking the course for credit (as a certificate course or towards a degree).

  1. Weekly written reports (as detailed in the assignments that will be posted in the Google Classroom for the course) on a course total of 1,376 pages of reading and 263 minutes of viewing;
  2. Timely completion of three research papers[1] of 1,250 to 1,750 words each (requiring no additional reading); and
  3. Active participation (as detailed in the assignments that will be posted in the Google Classroom for the course) in the online discussion forums for this course.
  4. Description and weighting of elements to be evaluated:
  1. Reading reports:             35%
  2. Research papers:            30%
  3. Discussion forums:  35%

  1. In this course we will use the following  grading scale:

Letter Grade

Numerical Equivalents

Grade Point

Grasp of Subject Matter

Other Qualities Expected of Students

A RANGE: Excellent: Student shows original  thinking, analytic and synthetic ability,  critical evaluations, broad knowledge base

A+

90-100

4.0

Profound and Creative

Strong evidence of original thought, of analytic and synthetic ability; sound and penetrating critical evaluations which identify assumptions of those they study as well as their own; mastery of an extensive knowledge base

A

85-89

4.0

Outstanding

A-

80-84

3.7

Excellent

Clear evidence of original thinking, of analytic and synthetic ability; sound critical evaluations; broad knowledge base

B RANGE: Good: Student shows critical capacity and analytic ability, understanding

of relevant issues, familiarity with the literature

B+

77-79

3.3

Very Good

Good critical capacity and analytic ability; reasonable understanding of relevant issues; good familiarity with the literature

B

73-76

3.0

Good

B-

 

70-72

2.7

 

Satisfactory at a post-baccalaureate level

Adequate critical capacity and analytic ability; some understanding of relevant issues; some familiarity with the literature

F

0-69

0

Failure

Failure to meet the above criteria

  1. If you are taking this course for credit you should plan to commit between 9 and 12 hours a week to completing the coursework. If you find you need substantially more time than suggested here, please contact the instructor. Please also see the note at the end of this syllabus with regard to disability or health considerations that may require accommodations.

4. Required Readings and Viewings

* Indicates books that course participants will need to purchase.

>>Indicates books that will be read by all students, including continuing education learning experience participants (who are not required to do the other readings).

Brooks, David. “The Odyssey Years.” New York Times, October 9, 2007.

(http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/09/opinion/09brooks.html) [2pp.] (Hereafter referred to as Brooks.)

>>*Burnett, Bill, and Dave Evans. Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life. Knopff, 2016. [272 pp.] (Hereafter referred to as Evans, a little unfairly.) [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: ON ORDER, Release date: Sept. 20, 2016)

Estevez, Emilio, director. The Way. Filmax Entertainment/Icon Entertainment/International Elixir Films, 2010. [123 minutes] (Hereafter referred to as The Way.)

Evans, Dave, and Bill Burnett. “Stanford Open Office Hours.”

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKEq5iEmMSo) [25 minutes of viewing] (Hereafter referred to as the Evans video, once again a little unfairly.)

Green, Penelope, “Really Thinking About Things,” New York Times, 2007 [3 pp.]. (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/08/garden/08turkle.html?fta=y&_r=0) (Hereafter referred to as Green.)

>>*Ibarra, Herminia. Working Identity: Unconventional Strategies for Reinventing Your Career. Harvard Business School Press, 2004. [199 pages] (Hereafter referred to as Ibarra.) [UTL Business Library: CC HF5384 .I23 2004 (Career Resources)]

O'Connell,  Ainsley. “Stanford's Most Popular Class Isn't Computer Science—It's Something Much More Important.” Fast Company, March 2015. [2pp.]

http://www.fastcompany.com/3044043/most-creative-people/stanfords-most-popular-class-isnt-computer-science-its-something-much-m (Hereafter referred to as O'Connell.)

*Parks, Sharon Daloz. Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Emerging Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith. Revised 10th Anniversary Edition. Jossey-Bass, 2011. [352 pages] (Hereafter referred to as Parks.) [UTL Robarts Library: BL42 .P37 2011X]

>>*Smith, James K.A. You Are What You Love: The Spiritual Power of Habit. Brazos, 2016. [240 pages] (Hereafter referred to as Smith.) [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BV 176.3 .S48 2016]

Turkle, Sherry, “What makes an object evocative?,” in Turkle, Sherry (ed.), Evocative Objects: Things We Think With. MIT Press, 2011 [22 pp.]. (https://llk.media.mit.edu/courses/readings/Turkle-EO-conclusion.pdf) (Hereafter referred to as Turkle.) [UofT Library e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/8840373]

Vallée, Jean-Marc, director. Wild. Pacific Standard/Fox Searchlight Pictures, 2014. [115 minutes] (Hereafter refered to as Wild.)

Von Busch, Otto. Research Navigation. (http://old.researchcatalogue.net/view?weave=1372) [12 pages] (Hereafter referred to as Von Busch.)

>>*Whyte, David. Crossing the Unknown Sea: Work as a Pilgrimage of Identity. Riverhead Books, 2001. [272 pages] (Hereafter referred to as Whyte.) [UTL Robarts Library: BJ1498 .W48 2001X]

5. Recommended Readings and Viewings

Argyris, Chris, “Teaching Smart People How to Learn,” Harvard Business Review, 1991. [UofT Library e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/8395274]

Buster, Bobette. “Can you tell your story?” Do Lectures, 2012. (http://dolectures.com/lectures/can-you-tell-your-story/)

Byock, Ira. Dying Well: Peace and Possibilities at the End of Life. Riverhead Books, 1997. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: HQ 1073 .B96 1998]

Christensen , Clayton M., “How Will You Measure Your Life?,” Harvard Business Review, 2010. [UofT Library e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/8395274]

DeLong, Thomas J. and DeLong, Sara, “Managing Yourself: The Paradox of Excellence,” Harvard Business Review, 2011. [UofT Library e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/8395274]

Drucker, Peter F., “Managing Oneself,” Harvard Business Review, 2005. [UofT Library e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/8395274]

Garber, Steven. Visions of Vocation: Common Grace for the Common Good. IVP Books, 2014. [UTL Knox College Library: BV4740 .G37 2014]

Gelb, David, director. Jiro Dreams of Sushi. Magnolia, 2011.

Hall, Donald. Life Work. Beacon, 2003. [UTL Robarts Library: PS3515 .A3152 Z475 1993 Note: this is not the same edition]

Hall, Donald. The Best Day the Worst Day: Life with Jane Kenyon. Houghton Mifflin, 2005. [UTL Robarts Library: PS 3561 .E58 Z74 2005]

Harris, Joseph. Rewriting: How to Do Things with Texts. Utah State University Press, 2006. [UTL Robarts Library: PE1404 .H363 2006X]

Jerome, John. Stone Work: Reflections on Serious Play & Other Aspects of Country Life. University Press of New England, 1989. [UTL Engineering & Computer Science Library: TH2249 .J47 1989]

Keller, Timothy, with Katherine Leary Alsdorf. Every Good Endeavor: Connecting Your Work to God’s Work. Penguin Books, 2014. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BT 738.5 .K35 2014]

Kurtz, Glenn. Practicing: A Musician’s Return to Music. Knopf, 2008. [UTL Music Library: ML419 .K97 A3 2007]

Lane, Belden C. The Solace of Fierce Landscapes: Exploring Desert and Mountain Spirituality. OUP, 1998. (In particular the coda to chapter 3, “Mythic Landscape / Stalking the Snow Leopard / A Reflection on Work.) [UTL Knox College Library: BV4501.2 .L31834 1998]

Meehl, Cindy, director. Buck. MPI, 2011.

Meilaender, Gilbert C. (ed). Working: Its Meaning and Its Limits. University of Notre Dame Press, 2000. [UTL Trinity College Library: BJ1498 .W64 2000]

Nichols, Mike, director. Wit. HBO, 2001.

Parks, Sharon Daloz. Leadership Can Be Taught: A Bold Approach for a Complex World. Harvard Business School Press, 2005. [UTL Robarts Library: HD57.7 .P3655 2005X]

Rankin, Lissa. The Anatomy of a Calling: A Doctor’s Journey from the Head to the Heart and a Prescription for Finding Your Life’s Purpose. Rodale, 2015. [available through the Toronto Public Library (TPL) system and online through TPL]

Riedelsheimer, Thomas, director. Rivers & Tides. Docurama, 2004.

Senge, Peter, “The Leader’s New Work,” Sloan Management Review, 1990. [UofT e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/7755215]

Smith, James K.A. Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation. Baker, 2009. [240 pages] [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BV178 .S63 2009]

Stanford d.school. The Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators.

(http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/)

Stanford d.school. Virtual Crash Course in Design Thinking. (http://dschool.stanford.edu/dgift/)

Swanbeck, John, director. The Big Kahuna. Lions Gate Films, 2000.

Williams, Tod and Tsien, Billie, Wunderkammer. Yale Books, 2013. [UTL Robarts Library: NA680 .W55 2013Y]

Further recommendations may be made by the instructor during the course.

6. Course Schedule

There will be opportunities for students taking the course for credit to do Google Hangouts with the instructor during this course. Those opportunities will be announced in advance in the Google Classroom for this course. While these Google Hangouts are not required, they may serve as a helpful opportunity to come to grips with the readings and other assignments in conversation with the instructor - and particularly in conversation with other students.

All assignments for a particular week must be completed by the deadlines provided in the Google Classroom, although a total of two emergency exceptions to this requirement may be arranged by means of timely email correspondence with the instructor. In the absence of such timely arrangements, assignments not completed within the required time frame will receive a zero grade.

Module 1, Week 1

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read the Welcome Message in the Google Classroom for this course.
  2. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Introduce yourself to the other course participants in the Google Classroom Introductions Assignment.
  4. Read through the course syllabus carefully and ask any initial questions you have about the syllabus and the course in the Syllabus Review and Course Questions assignment in the Google Classroom.
  5. Read the note in the Google Classroom on How to Write A Reading Report.
  6. Read Brooks and Von Busch.

Module 1, Week 2

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Smith, Preface and Chapters 1 and 2.
  2. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday (or in the early pre-dawn hours of Thursday!). Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday (or the early pre-dawn hours or Saturday!). (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)

Module 1, Week 3

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Smith, Chapters 3, 4, and 7.
  2. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Post your reading report on Smith as a comment to the Reading Report assignment in the Google Classroom by Wednesday (or in the early pre-dawn hours of Thursday!).
  4. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)

Module 1, Week 4

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read O'Connell.
  2. Watch the Evans video.
  3. Read Evans, Introduction and Chapters 1 and 2.
  4. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  5. Post your responses to the “Dashboard” and “Compass” assignments in the Google Classroom by Wednesday (if it’s still Wednesday somewhere on the planet, that’s fine, even if it’s already Thursday where you are).
  6. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)

Module 1, Week 5

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Evans, Chapters 3, 4, and 5.
  2. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Post your responses to the “Good Times Journal” and “Odyssey Plans” assignments in the Google Classroom by Wednesday-ish.
  4. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)

Module 1, Week 6

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Evans, Chapters 6, 10, 11, and the Conclusion.
  2. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Post your responses to the “Prototype Conversations” and “Failure Reframing” assignments in the Google Classroom by Wednesday-ish.
  4. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)
  5. Following instructions in the Google Classroom for this course, post a research paper of 1,250 to 1,750 words as a Google Doc by Friday-ish.

Module 2, Week 1

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Ibarra, Preface and Chapters 1 to 4.
  2. Read Parks, Preface and Chapters 1 to 4.
  3. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  4. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)

Module 2, Week 2

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Ibarra, Chapters 5 to 8.
  2. Read Parks, Chapters 5 to 8.
  3. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  4. Post your reading report on Ibarra in the Reading Report assignment in the Google Classroom by Wednesday-ish.
  5. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)

Module 2, Week 3

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Whyte, Chapters 1 and 2.
  2. Read Parks, Chapters 9 and 10, and the Coda.
  3. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  4. Post your reading report on Parks in the Reading Report assignment in the Google Classroom by Wednesday-ish.
  5. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)

Module 2, Week 4

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Whyte, Chapters 3 to 5.
  2. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)

Module 2, Week 5

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Whyte, Chapters 6 to 11.
  2. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Post your reading report on Whyte in the Reading Report assignment in the Google Classroom by Wednesday-ish.
  4. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)

Module 2, Week 6

Assignments (Continuing education learning experience participants )

Assignments (Students taking the course for credit)

  1. Read Green and Turkle.
  2. Watch the videos posted in the Google Classroom for this week.
  3. Post your responses to the “Evocative Object” assignment in the Google Classroom by Wednesday-ish.
  4. Post a response of about 250 words to the question raised by the instructor in the Discussion Forum assignment in the Google Classroom for this course by Wednesday-ish. Subsequently post a further response of about 150 words to the response of any other student participant by Friday-ish. (Further participation in the discussion of the readings in this topic thread is encouraged but not required.)
  5. Following instructions in the Google Classroom for this course, post a second research paper of 1,250 to 1,750 words as a Google Doc by Friday-ish.
  6. Watch The Way and Wild and, following instructions in the Google Classroom for this course, post a third research paper of 1,250 to 1,750 words as a Google Doc within six weeks of completion of the course. (Please see again the footnote about course completion for the full thirteen weeks of credit under paragraph 3 on Course Requirements, above.)

Students with diverse learning styles and needs are welcome in this course. In particular, if you have a disability or health consideration that may require accommodations, please feel free to approach me and/or Student Services as soon as possible.


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[1] The completion of all assignments including the third of these three papers (the latter by no later than  the date that will be announced during Module 2, Week 6) are required for the completion of this course for the full thirteen weeks of credit, taking into account that there are only twelve weekly sessions scheduled.