GRACE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

High School

Course Description Catalog

Chiang Mai, Thailand

2017-18


Table of Contents

On-level and Honors Courses

Advanced Placement (AP) Courses

Fine Arts

Computer Science

Languages

Language Arts

Mathematics

Music

Physical Education

Religious Studies

Science

Social Studies

Educational/ESL Support

Technical Education

Non-Departmental

Welcome to Grace International School

Welcome to Grace International School, home of the Tigers! This course description catalog has been developed to assist you in planning a course of study for your high school years. Please read it carefully.  It is important to note that some elective courses listed may not be offered due to low student enrollment or teacher availability. The faculty, counselors, and administrators are available to help you in this decision making process.  Please take advantage of the many opportunities here at Grace.

Mission and Vision

Grace International School exists primarily to enable international Christian workers to remain in their field of service by providing for the needs of their children through an integrated education from a Christian worldview.

GIS cultivates students of Christ-like character and values who will transform their world.

ACCREDITATION

Western Association of Schools and Colleges

Member since 2005

Association of Christian Schools International

Member since 2005 Accreditation #20935


On-level and Honors Courses

Grace offers on-level, honors, and AP courses.

Course Terminology:

On-Level - The course is aligned to our subject standards for that course.  The ability levels of the students who take this course are broadly distributed and their needs diverse. There is enough time in this course for the teacher to assist all students in mastering the content and skills.  The course is weighted with a 1 in the GPA.

An on-level course is taught on a high school course level.  Complex ideas are taught so that everyone should be able to understand the foundational principles.  The mastery of skills needed for students to pursue further studies in the topic in preparation for college is emphasized.

Honors - Honors courses at GIS are aligned to our subject standards for that course and may include some additional standards.  The College Board states that “honors classes often offer the same curriculum as regular classes but are tailored for high-achieving students—covering additional topics or some topics in greater depth.”  The focus of an honors course is to better prepare students for the level of difficulty of AP courses.  The course is weighted with a multiplier of 1.2 in the GPA.

For students applying to more selective universities, it is important that the university sees that they have chosen to take rigorous courses.  The honors course designation on the transcript shows universities that students have taken rigorous courses (“Honors and AP Courses”).

An honors course is taught on a high school level but includes some of the higher demands of college level work.  Students are expected to be more self-motivated and able to engage in abstract thinking and application problems.  They are expected to synthesize concepts that they previously learned and apply them as they complete more complex tasks.  

Entrance into an honors course is based on relevant teacher approval along with the requirements listed below.

 

Honors Algebra 2

Algebra 1 and Geometry – B+ average

Honors Anatomy & Physiology

Integrated Science, Biology, or Honors Biology – B average

Honors Biology

Science 8 – A average

Algebra 1 – B average

Honors Chemistry

One year of high school science – A average

Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 (can be concurrent) recommended

Honors Drafting 3

Honors Drafting 4

Drafting 1 and 2 – B average

Honors Studio Art

Art Foundations, Advanced Art, Painting – B average

 “Honors and AP Courses." Collegeboard.org. The College Board, 2012. Web. 12 Dec. 2012.

Advanced Placement (AP) Courses

Advanced Placement, or AP, is a program that offers high school students the opportunity to take college level courses during high school.  Students take courses during the year and then take the exam in May.  Students taking AP courses are not obligated to take the exam but are encouraged to do so.  The AP courses offered vary from school to school.  The AP grades that are reported to students, high schools, colleges, and universities in July are on a five-point scale:

Many colleges and universities in the US grant college credits or advanced placement based on AP exam grades.  Universities in countries outside the US use AP courses and exam grades as criteria for admissions.  Policies vary by institution, so you should research the country and university to determine their policies.  

AP courses are aligned to the standards for that course outlined by the College Board. AP courses are taught as college level courses as they “cover the breadth of information, skills, and assignments found in corresponding college courses” (“Honors and AP Courses”).  Considering that high school students are still developing intellectually and emotionally, they are given more guidance and structure than they would receive in an actual college course.  At GIS an AP course is weighted with a multiplier of 1.25 in the GPA.

The following prerequisites are established by GIS and are not the requirements of College Board or the AP program.  These requirements are established due to the demanding nature of the AP program.  

All AP courses have an application process.  This process involves relevant teacher approval in addition to the requirements listed below.  The application for AP courses is at this link:  AP Application   Every student who is approved for an AP course must sign a GIS AP contract.

“Honors and AP Courses." Collegeboard.org. The College Board, 2012. Web. 12 Dec. 2012.

  AP Course Requirements

AP Biology

Biology or Honors Biology – B average

1 additional science, preferably Chemistry

AP Physics 1

Algebra 1 and Geometry – A average

Concurrent with Algebra 2

AP Physics 2

AP Physics 1, Algebra 2 – B average

AP Physics C

AP Physics 1, Pre-calculus, AP Calculus (can be concurrent)

AP Chemistry

Honors Chemistry or Biology and Chemistry – A average

Algebra 2 – B average

AP Calculus

Pre-calculus – B+ average

AP Statistics

Algebra 2 – B average; B average in English courses recommended

AP US History

World History or US History

AP World History

World Geography – B average

AP English Literature & Composition

Three previous English courses, overall B average.  Application essay required.

AP Studio Art

Art Foundations, Advanced Art, Painting – B average

AP Psychology

World Geography & World History (or equivalent)  

English 9 & 10 with B average or higher


Fine Arts

Art Foundations     FA115

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course is an introduction to visual communication and the language of art through 2D media such as pencil and pen.  The student is exposed to the elements of art as well as various artistic styles. Students learn the five perceptions of art, which is a sequential learning process that teaches them how to “see” in order to draw. Art projects include portraiture, cubism, transformation drawings, and positive/negative among others. Art foundation students participate in class critiques of their work, and they display their work in the annual student art show held in May.

Advanced Art     FA215

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Art Foundations

Grades: 10-12

Students are introduced to advanced drawing techniques, doing AP studio art projects along with the AP students during first semester. The course will include experiences in abstract, mixed media, painting, watercolor, pen and ink illustration, Thai design, and pencil realism.  Students are given instructions but have room for creative individual expression. They participate in an annual art auction to raise money for the annual art ministry trip to teach art to tribal kids who have no resources. Students also participate in peer art critiques and an art critique field trip to local galleries. All 12th grade students who complete advanced art are eligible to have an individual display at the annual art show.

Painting     FA220

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: Art Foundations, Advanced Art (can be concurrent)

Grades: 10-12

The student will explore various paint methods including watercolor, acrylic, pastel, and mixed media.  They will move through the genres of realism, impressionism, abstract, monochromatic and pop art.   Critiques involve students in reacting to their own works and the works of their peers both in oral and written form. Students participate in an annual art auction to raise money for the annual art ministry trip to teach art to tribal kids who have no resources. Students also participate in an art critique field trip to local galleries. All 12th grade students who complete painting are eligible to have an individual display at the annual art show.

Pottery & Sculpture     FA130 (offered 1st semester only) [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of pottery through a variety of techniques including clay preparation, pinch pots, slab pots, boxes, slipping techniques, beginning wheel-thrown pots, glaze usage, and glaze mixing.  Students will also explore basic forms in clay both functional and decorative.  Students will be graded on completed projects, class participation, and the detail entries of their sketchbooks.

Advanced Pottery & Sculpture     FA230 (offered 2nd semester only) [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Pottery & Sculpture

Grades: 9-12

Advanced pottery & sculpture builds on the skills and concepts of pottery & sculpture to develop more complicated approaches.  The same media will be used in the course but in greater depth and with differing glazing techniques. Students will gain experience in hand built and wheel thrown projects. Students will also go on a field trip to a local pottery factory and showroom.

Honors Studio Art     FA300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: Art Foundations, Advanced Art, and Painting

Grades: 11-12

The honors art course is for students interested in learning advanced techniques and creating art based on a conceptual theme. Honors students will meet with advanced art and AP students and explore a variety of techniques, compositions, and genres. Six pieces will be completed the first semester using a variety of techniques. Second semester students will create a series of pieces that explore a conceptual theme based on their own ideas. This course is intended for those interested in exploring college level art at a less rigorous pace than the AP course load.

AP Studio Art      FA400

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: Art Foundations, Advanced Art, and Painting

Grades: 11-12

AP studio art in drawing or 2D design is a program for those serious art students who wish to participate in a rigorous program designed as a first year college course. In May students submit 24 pieces to the College Board for an AP rating. Students complete a set of 12 projects semester 1 which cover a wide variety of techniques, compositions and genres. During semester 2 students complete a set of 12 projects following a theme and showing growth in their art. The course requires almost one project every week or week and a half.

Computer Science

Computer Science 1--Computer Exploration     CS100 (offered 1st semester only) [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12 (recommended 9th grade)

This course is designed as an introduction to computers, word processing, graphic/photo editing, and programming.  Students will build foundational and practical skills using a word processor. Students will explore the concepts of programming and graphic editing. This course will prepare students for further study in computer science.

 

Computer Science 2--Spreadsheets     CS200 (offered 2nd semester only) [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None (Computer Science 1 recommended)

Grades: 9-12 (recommended 9th grade)

Computer Science 2 is an introduction to the use of spreadsheets. Students will be able to set up, format, and create formulas in a spreadsheet.  Students will learn to how to use function formulas, graphs, and charts to manipulate and represent data. 

Computer Science 3--Adobe Photoshop     CS310 (offered 1st semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Computer Science 1 or 2; or Drafting 1 [Waived for 2017-18]

Grades: 10-12

This course introduces students to the use and tools of Adobe Photoshop, an image editing program. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to edit digital images, understand the concepts of digital photography, and create digital projects from scratch. 

Computer Science 3--Adobe Illustrator     CS340 (offered 2nd semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: CS 3 Adobe Photoshop

Grades: 10-12

 

This course teaches students the process of creating vector based illustrations using Adobe Illustrator. Students will develop design techniques to create projects like logos, stylized illustrations, and technical drawings. 

Yearbook     CS350

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None, but Photoshop is recommended

Grades: 10-12 (Grade 10 with teacher recommendation)

Journalism yearbook is year-long course which produces and publishes the yearbook for Grace International School.  Students will be responsible for writing, designing, editing, and photographing those events and activities which define the school year. Students will learn journalistic writing, design, and publishing techniques. Students will be trained in the use of desktop publishing software.


Computer Science 4--Programming     CS400 (offered 2nd semester only)
 [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisites:         Computer Science 1 and 2 or Drafting 1 and 2;  Algebra 2

Completion of or co-enrollment in Pre-Calculus

Grades: 11-12

This course is an introduction to computer programming. Students will demonstrate mastery in the areas of object-oriented programming, creation of classes, data structure and algorithms. Students understand good programming style as well as modify and debug their own programs.

Languages

Spanish 1     LS120

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Spanish 1 establishes a basic understanding of written and spoken communication in Spanish.  Spanish and Latin American cultures are explored in conjunction with language learning.

Spanish 2     LS220

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or instructor approval

Grades: 10-12 (Grade 9 with permission)

This course builds on Spanish 1 with an emphasis on improving and solidifying grammatical skills.  Memorization and presentation of skits and reading of short stories is incorporated.  An edited version of Don Quijote de la Mancha will be studied. 

Spanish 3     LS330

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or instructor approval

Grades: 10-12

Spanish 3 builds on the foundation of vocabulary and grammar established in Spanish 1 and 2.  Emphasis is given to conversation to promote increased verbal fluency, the expansion of reading comprehension, and an introduction to Spanish poetry and literature.

Spanish 4     LS420  

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or instructor approval

Grades: 10-12

This course focuses on developing the “three strands” of language acquisition, interpersonal/interactive, interpretative/receptive, and presentational/productive. The focus is on the use of language already acquired as well as ongoing deepening of language skills. Materials used for preparing for the AP Spanish Language test will be used along with the use of authentic sources such as newspapers, recordings, films, and magazines. Students may choose to take the AP Spanish language test even though Spanish 4 is not listed as an AP course.

Introduction to Thai Culture and Thai Language     LS 150 (offered 1st semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course is required by the Thai ministry of education for new high school students who have just arrived in Thailand and do not want to take a full year of Thai.  The purpose of this course is for non-Thai students to cultivate an understanding of and good attitude towards Thai culture and Thai people. Students are expected to conduct themselves appropriately in Thai society and show appreciation of and respect for cultural diversity. This course includes cultural content such as knowledge of Thailand, Thai manners, the Thai nation, Thai history, Thai cultural practices, Buddhism, Thai art, Thai products, and tourist attractions.

Thai 1      LS110                

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course is designed for students new to the Thai language. This course is an introduction to listening, reading, writing, and speaking the Thai language. Students will start writing some of the middle, high, and low class consonants and will start mixing short and long simple vowels with these consonants. They will also start speaking Thai from what they have written. Additionally, students will participate in Thai cultural experiences such as proper greetings, politely responding to Thai people, and doing Thai crafts such as making paper balls and weaving with bamboo strips. They will also have a chance to join the Khan Tok dinner, a Northern Thai style dinner.

Thai 2      LS210

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Middle School Thai 3 and pass the placement test, or Thai 1

Grades: 9-12

In this course students will continue to develop in their skills of listening to, reading, writing, and speaking Thai. They will write more consonants with more complex vowels and will also learn tone rules to apply to the words they have learned. Students will add more vocabulary in their speaking and writing skills as they experience opportunities to develop their Thai in all areas. Additionally, students will participate in Thai cultural experiences such as cooking Thai food.

Thai 3             LS310

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Thai 2 or Thai 2.5

Grades: 9-12

This course is a continuation of the basic listening, reading, writing and speaking skills needed to be fluent in the Thai language. In this course students will focus on Thai history, Thai customs, Thai proverbs, education, reading short stories, and news.

Thai 4             LS410  [This course will not be offered 2017-18]  

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Thai 3

Grades: 10-12

This course is a continuation of the basic listening, reading, writing and speaking skills needed to be fluent in the Thai language. In this course students will focus on Thai history, Thai customs, Thai proverbs, education, reading short stories, and news.

National Thai        

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Thai national

Grades: 9-12

Students in national Thai experience a four year cycle of curriculum topics that develop skills in reading, writing, speaking, thinking, and listening.  Topics offered throughout the courses include the Ramakien, Four Reigns, Three Kingdoms, public speaking, current events, non-fiction, and typing practice.  Thai history topics are also covered in-depth.  Students will write short stories, essays, journals, poetry, and reports.  Cultural activities are included with field trips offered every other year.

9th Grade      LS100                                                11th Grade     LS300

10th Grade    LS200                                                12th Grade     LS400

Mandarin 1    LS130

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Mandarin 1 is an introduction to Chinese language and culture for students who have little or no experience with the Chinese language.  Mandarin 1 covers all 4 facets of the Chinese language: speaking, listening, reading and writing.  The class will use pinyin (phonetics) to study correct pronunciation and Chinese characters to build reading and writing skills.  The class will provide opportunity for students to learn useful vocabulary for daily life.   Multimedia and native language guest speakers are also an integral part of the classroom experience.

Mandarin 2    LS230

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Mandarin 1 (or placement test)

Grades: 9-12

Mandarin 2 will build on vocabulary and writing learned in Mandarin 1.  The focus in class will be to increase mastery in the areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  The course will continue in the “Discovering Chinese series”, Volumes 3 and 4.  The course will be explore Chinese grammar and add to the character base from Mandarin 1.  Mandarin 2 will be predominantly in Hanzi.  By the time students have finished Mandarin 2, they will be prepared to take the SAT II Chinese subject exam. Students who have had previous Mandarin may ask for a placement test and, if passed, can take Mandarin 2.

Mandarin 3    LS320

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Mandarin 2 (or placement test)

Grades: 9-12

Mandarin 3 is for the intermediate to advanced Chinese student.  Students will engage in interactive learning that will cultivate the foundation that they built in Mandarin 1 and 2.  Mandarin 3 will continue to push students to not only use their Mandarin inside the classroom, but also use it with Chinese speakers in the community.  Students will be using "Magical Tour of China" textbooks by Better Chinese.  These books focus on learning Chinese through exploring Chinese culture.  Students who have had previous Mandarin may ask for a placement test for Mandarin 3.

Mandarin 4    LS430

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Mandarin 3 (or placement test)

Grades: 9-12

Mandarin 4 is for the advanced Chinese student.  Building on a foundation from the first 3 years of Mandarin, Mandarin 4 students will extend their knowledge of both practical and literary Mandarin.  Mandarin 4 will continue with the study of vocabulary and grammar, but students will also focus on Chinese culture and history.  Students will be using "Magical Tour of China" textbooks, volumes 3 and 4, by Better Chinese.  Mandarin 4 will also prepare students for the AP Mandarin exam offered in May. Students who have had previous Mandarin may ask for a placement test for Mandarin 4.

Korean Writing 1        LS240 [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 10-12 (Grade 10 with permission)

This course is designed for Korean high school 10th, 11th and 12th grade students who hope to enter Korean colleges after graduation from GIS. It  will focus on equipping overseas Korean students to study Korean writing and reading.  Korean Writing 1  will start from a beginning level and is different from a Korean Language subject in Korean High schools.

Korean Writing 2        LS340 [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Korean Writing 1 and pass a placement test

Grades: 11-12

This course is designed for Korean high school students in grade 11 and 12  who have completed Korean Writing 1 and hope to enter Korean college after graduation from GIS. This course will  focus on practical essay writing necessary for entrance exam and college studying. Additionally, students will have a chance to read Korean literature.

Korean Writing 3        LS440 [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Korean Writing  2

Grades: 11-12

Korean Writing 4        LS540 [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Korean Writing 3

Grades: 11-12

The Korean Writing 3 and 4 courses are designed for students in grades 11 or 12 who have successfully completed Korean Writing 1 and 2.   Korean Writing 1 and 2 are based on writing theory, Korean reading materials and practice writing Korean essays. Korean Writing 3 and 4 are more focused on preparing for Korean college entrance exams.

Korean universities and colleges require two types of Korean writing essays for prospective students in the admission process. One is a self-introductory essay and the other is a high school level essay related to possible future majors in college. These courses will prepare students to write college admissions essays and to read at a Korean college level. Furthermore, these courses will provide the chance to practice mock interviews for college entrance requirements based on the self-introductory essay.

Language Arts

English 9     LA100

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grade: 9

English 9 is a multi-genre, literature-based course providing instruction in the following areas: reading comprehension, vocabulary, mechanics and usage, and essay writing. This course exposes students to short stories, dramas, poetry, and novels studying the unique characteristics and literary terms associated with each.  Speaking and listening skills will be improved through class discussions, oral assignments, and group work.  One research paper will be required.

English 10: World Literature     LA200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: English 9

Grade: 10

English 10 builds upon the short story, drama, novel, and poetry genres discussed in English 9 and adds an emphasis on non-fiction.  It is based upon a variety of world literature, comparing and contrasting ideas found within different cultures. An emphasis will be made on understanding the rhetorical skills used to construct solid arguments, and students will develop skill in building effective arguments in writing.  Emphasis will be placed upon analyzing written material through written essays and class discussion. Vocabulary building is a yearlong activity.  One research paper will be required.  A written report on one book read outside of class (fiction or non-fiction) will also be required.

U.S. (American) Literature     LA300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: English 10 or administrative approval

Grades: 11-12 (Required for Grade 11 unless alternate approved by Academic Counselor)

U.S. Literature is a study of literature from the United States, ranging from the colonial period to the twentieth century.  Students will be required to analyze various aspects of literature through class discussion and in writing.  Vocabulary building is a yearlong activity. A research paper will be required.  

British Literature     LA400

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: English 10 or administrative approval

Grades: 11-12

British Literature is a study of literature from England, ranging from Beowulf to the twentieth century.  As students study each time period, they will focus on how historical events affected the literature and critically examine the authors’ ideas and worldviews with Biblical truth.  Students will come away from this class with experience in writing resumes/CVs, college entrance essays, analysis essays, and exploration of texts in different media.  Vocabulary building is a yearlong activity.  

AP English Literature and Composition     LA500

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: 10th grade English, American or British Literature preferred

Grades: 11-12

Advanced Placement English offers a curriculum in literature and writing for grade 11 and 12 students who wish to experience a college-level course.  In this course students will acquire the technical vocabulary and critical skills needed to analyze classic works of fiction, poetry, and drama.  They will write critical essays, make oral presentations, do peer revision, participate in class discussions, do research, and take practice exams.  Students are required to complete pre-course reading and writing assignments over the summer preceding the course. They should also be prepared to do a larger amount of outside reading for class each day. Frequent essay writing will be required.

The following courses are listed under the Language Arts Department but do not fulfill the graduation requirement for English credit:

 

Speech     LA220  [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Speech is designed as a course to improve public speaking in formal and informal settings. The focus is on activities which address the organization, preparation, and delivery of solo speaking opportunities including informative, visual aid, demonstration, and persuasive speeches. Work also includes effective listening, oral interpretation, and group discussion.

Drama      LA230  [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course includes a survey approach to the history of Western theatre from ancient Greece to the present day, including a sampling of theatre literature selected from various periods of history and representing different genres and styles. This course is an introduction to the many skills and crafts involved in mounting a successful theatre production. Students will gain hands-on experience in rehearsing, performing, and producing a live show for an audience. Activities will include reading and analyzing scripts, acting games and exercises, creating a character, preparing scenes and monologues for class presentation, practical projects in set, prop, costume, makeup, lighting, sound, and publicity design/production. Each student should expect to participate fully in all aspects of the class: academics, acting, and backstage crew. The main project for the course will be the public presentation of either several one-act plays or a single longer play.

Creative Writing LA250  [Not offered 2017-18]

Credit: One semester course 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

 

This course is designed to enable students who are accomplished, analytical, and imaginative in their use of English to refine their understanding and appreciation of the cultural roles and significance of writing. It is designed for those who possess a particular passion to pursue a specialized study of English. In creative writing you will be able to pursue areas of interest with a greater degree of independence than in other English courses. Through extended engagement in investigation and composition, students will explore multiple meanings and values of texts, delving into reading and writing practices that will widen their repertoire and deepen their insight.

Mathematics

Math Sequence Options

On-Level Sequence

7th Grade – Math 7 (based solely on placement test score)

8th Grade – Math 8 (based solely on placement test score)

9th Grade – Algebra 1

10th Grade – Geometry or Personal Finance

11th Grade – Algebra 2, Honors Algebra 2, Geometry, Personal Finance

12th Grade - Algebra 2, Honors Algebra 2, Geometry, Pre-Calculus, AP Statistics, Personal Finance

Accelerated Sequence

7th Grade – Math 7 Accelerated (based solely on placement test score)

8th Grade – Algebra 1 (based solely on placement test score)

9th Grade – Geometry

10th Grade – Algebra 2, Honors Algebra 2

11th Grade – Pre-Calculus, AP Statistics, Personal Finance

12th Grade – Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus (AB), Calculus, AP Statistics, Personal Finance

If students wish to accelerate faster than the above course sequences, they must prove that they have mastered the course content by taking the course following the Transfer Credit Policy – Secondary found in the Parent, Student, and Member Organization Handbook. Students may not take an online course during the school year for a course that GIS is currently offering. Online courses must be completed during the summer, and only with approval of the Academic Counselor. Parents are responsible for any costs related to courses taken online.  

A graphing calculator is suggested for all mathematics courses and required for Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus, and AP Statistics. See the calculator policy in the Parent, Student, and Member Organization Handbook.

Algebra 1     MA090 (MS) or MA100 (HS)

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: MA090--placement test, MA100--none

Grades: 8-12

This course covers various aspects of basic algebra, including graphs and formulas, ratios and proportions, variation, powers and roots, simple and multiple-step equations, and systems of equations.  After the students develop understanding of solving a certain type of problem with numbers, similar types of problems with literal answers are introduced to reinforce the concepts and further develop the students' problem solving abilities. Within the context of the course, the ability to solve various types of word problems is also stressed. Time is spent in instructing students in the use of graphing calculators.

Personal Finance     MA110

Credit:  Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1

Grades: 11-12

In this course students will learn how to use money wisely following biblical principles as they apply basic math skills in practical applications.  Students will learn how to avoid common financial pitfalls so that they will be empowered to make sound financial decisions for life.  Key course topics include saving and investing, credit and debt, financial responsibility and money management, insurance, income/careers, and risk management.

Geometry     MA200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1

Grades: 9-12

This course applies the logical principles of inductive and deductive reasoning to various areas of both two and three-dimensional geometry. The course includes a wide range of definitions, symbols, theorems, constructions, and simple proofs.  The topics of area, volume, symmetry, and some trigonometry are also included. Time is spent in instructing students in the use of graphing calculators.

Algebra 2     MA300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Geometry

Grades: 9-12

This course is a continuation of Algebra 1. Included in this course are various concepts of factoring, formulas, quadratic functions and equations, powers and roots, imaginary numbers, sequences and series, inverse functions, logarithms, and more trigonometry. Time is spent in instructing students in the use of graphing calculators. Topics similar to those covered in Algebra 1 are covered in greater depth and covered on a more advanced level.  

Honors Algebra 2     MA 350

Credit:  Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite:  Algebra 1, Geometry (can be co-enrolled in Geometry)

Grades: 9-12

This course is for the mathematically advanced student who desires an extensive and comprehensive development of Algebra 2 topics.  Students will be expected to develop an in-depth understanding of the topics including functional analysis and will be expected to draw relationships among the concepts studied.  

Pre-Calculus     MA400

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Geometry, Algebra 2 (at least B average in both recommended )

Grades: 10-12

This challenging course is designed to prepare students for calculus and AP calculus, but also serves as a fitting end for those who will take it as a final mathematics course in high school. Topics include advanced features of algebra, trigonometry, polar coordinates, conic sections, sequences and series, matrices, transformations, logarithms, and introductory limits.  

AP Calculus     MA500

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus

Grades: 11-12

This challenging course is designed for mathematically advanced students who will pursue mathematics beyond high school.  The topics covered are those set by the College Board for the AP calculus exam.  Students may register to take the AP calculus exam in May.

AP Statistics     MA510

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 2

Grades: 11-12

The purpose of AP statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  Students are exposed to the broad conceptual schemes: exploring data, describing patterns and departures, sampling and experimentation, planning random phenomena using probability and simulation, anticipating patterns, exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, statistical inference, and estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

Music

High School Band     MU205

Credit: Full year, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Previous band experience

Grades: 9-12

High school band will present classic band literature as well as popular music on a more difficult level. This is a performance class where students are expected to participate in concerts and other school functions.

Jazz Band     MU210

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Enrolled in Band; audition or band director’s approval

Grades: 9-12

Jazz band is a course in the study and performance of jazz, rock, Latin, funk, and fusion styles.  Improvisation will be an integral part of this class.  Students must have previous experience on their instrument.  To be a part of this band, students must play one of the following instruments: saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, bass, drums, or guitar or have approval from the director.

High School Choir     MU220

Credit: Full year, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Students are introduced to proper vocal technique and given the opportunity to learn and perform music from different styles and periods.  The choir student will gain appreciation for the use of the human voice as an instrument of expression and communication.  Basic music theory skills are incorporated to enhance each student's music reading capabilities.  Concerts may be given at the end of each quarter.  Choir meets 2 1/2 periods a week and is open to any student who can demonstrate some aptitude in music.

Chanson Select Ensemble     MU230

Credit: Full year, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Enrolled in High School Choir, by audition only

Grades: 9-12

Grace Chanson select ensemble is for the advanced choral music student with experience in high school choir. This ensemble provides an opportunity for more independent singing and often adds choreography to the songs. Singers need to be good sight-readers.

Physical Education

**NOTE:  PE 1 and PE 2 are offered in alternate years.

Physical Education 1 (PE 1)     PE100 (offered 1st semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

In this course students will be given the opportunity to demonstrate their skills as well as do a research paper and presentation of one the sports offered. The sports/activities offered are: basketball, soccer, volleyball, swimming, and track and field.

Health     PE110 (offered 2nd semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite:  None

Grades: 9-12 (This course is required for graduation for all students)

This course is aimed at adopting a healthy lifestyle for life. Students will study a variety of topics including: health for living, the human body, drugs and health, and first aid. Students will learn about health through discussions, research, and practical experiences.

Physical Education 2 (PE 2)     PE120     [This course will not be offered in 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course provides students the opportunity to choose from a list of several international sports in which they will participate. As part of a small group they will research one sport and present their findings to the class. The sports options are: ultimate frisbee, flag football, water polo, futsal, takraw, cricket, tag rugby, handball and racket sports (table tennis, badminton, squash, and tennis).

Beginning Sports Conditioning     PE250

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Students will alternate lifting weights and cardiovascular fitness. Weightlifting will focus on increasing muscular strength and endurance using free and machine weights.  Students will learn proper safety, technique, and spotting for lifting.  Fitness will focus on cardiovascular endurance through a variety of activities such as: running, biking, aerobics, jump rope, bi/triathlon, and swimming.  Students will keep a log of their progress and achievements in both weights and cardiovascular fitness.

Advanced Sports Conditioning     PE350  [This course will not be offered in 2017-18]

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 10-12

Advanced conditioning is designed to develop muscular strength and power.  This course may teach students advanced lifting techniques including Olympic lifts.  Students will create positive fitness and/or sport skill goals and then create personal programs to achieve and improve on their goals.  This course is more self-directed as students work to achieve and improve on their goals.  

Sports Leadership--Teaching     PE200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: One PE course and teacher approval

Grades: 10-12

This course will introduce students to the concepts of teaching physical education. This includes planning, preparing, and assisting in a sporting activity and PE lesson. Basic communication skills, health, fair play, the role of sports officials, sports ministry, and leadership in sports are topics explored. The course is hands-on, and students will be required to teach elementary PE as well as assist with athletic programs.  Students are expected to commit to coaching one U12/U14 after school sport for 6-8 weeks, spending up to 30 hours outside of school.  

Sports Leadership--Officiating and Ministry     PE210

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Sports Leadership-Teaching and teacher approval

Grades: 11-12

This course trains students with specific sports officiating skills and then they apply them to help run the elementary athletic program including the rec league. All students are expected to give up their time after school to help run the elementary sports program, outreach events, and at other times when required.  Students will learn the principles of officiating as opposed to teaching; the skills and understanding to lead younger students; the roles of officials and judges in sport; how to organize a tournament/event; how to deliver safe, organized and effective sessions; and how to plan and implement a sports ministry trip.  They will be required to volunteer 250 hours of their time outside of class.

Basic Athletic Training        PE410 [This course will not be offered in 2017-18]

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisites: PE1 or PE2 and Health

Grades: 11-12

The purpose of this course is to prepare students in skills used in the fields of Sports Medicine and Athletic Training.  Students will be instructed on evaluation and treatment techniques for common sports injuries as well as functional anatomy and physiology.  The course can count towards PE requirements only if PE1 or PE2 has been taken.

Religious Studies

GIS students are required to complete one Religious Studies course for each year of attendance at GIS.  All four course offerings are 1-semester courses.  The first two courses are normally for grades 9-10; the last two courses are for grades 11-12 only.  

Bible Study Methods     RS110 (offered 1st semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Bible study methods is a practical hands-on course designed to train students with the methods and tools to study the Bible accurately and historically. Students will learn that rightly interpreted scripture is the final arbiter of truth. The curriculum is built on the inductive method of Bible study which includes observation, interpretation, and application. Students will learn the history of how we got the Bible as well as how to study the Bible in its historical context.

Theology     RS310 (offered 2nd semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: none

Grades: 9-12

Theology studies the Biblical doctrines of Christianity that have constituted the history of Christian thought with the perspective to understand and be able to explain the three major themes of scripture: creation, sin, and redemption. Theology seeks to prepare students to live integrated Christian lives by examining works of popular art and analyzing them from a Christian worldview perspective.  The text for the course is The Drama of Scripture by Craig Bartholomew.

Comparative Religions     RS 400 (offered 2nd semester only)

Credit:  One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite:  none

Grades: 11-12

Having taken Bible study methods and theology during their studies at GIS, students have been prepared to evaluate and understand the beliefs of other religions. The fundamental beliefs of major religions (Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, atheism, spirit worship) as well as predominant cults will be studied and compared to Christianity.  

Ethics     RS420 (offered 1st semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5

Prerequisite: none

Grade: 11-12

This course addresses major moral issues in today’s contemporary society. The course looks at these issues from a world culture perspective and searches for absolute answers to our moral dilemma using God’s word as a basis of authority. The course uses the texts Exploring Ethics: Selected Readings and Christian Ethics: Options and Issues.

Science


Science Sequence Options

The following chart is designed to show the availability of science courses at each grade level.

See the notes below the chart for further details.

COURSE OPTIONS

                                GRADE LEVELS

7

8

9

10

11

12

Science 7

X

Science 8

X

Integrated Science

X

X

X

X

Biology

X*

X

X

X

Chemistry

X

X

X

Physics

X

X

X

Honors Biology

X*

X

X

X

Honors Chemistry

X*

X

X

Honors Anatomy & Physiology

X*

X

X

AP Biology

X

X

AP Chemistry

X

X

AP Physics 1

X*

X

X

AP Physics 2

X

X

AP Physics C

X


Honors courses require teacher approval. AP courses require an application and teacher approval.
*
These accelerated choices will require additional teacher approval.

Integrated Science     SC150

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: None
Grade: 9 (10-12 for transfer students only)

Integrated science provides the scientific knowledge necessary to improve proficiency in higher level classes. The course includes topics covering aspects of biology, chemistry, and physics, with a strong emphasis on developing science thinking and experimentation skills.  It is especially useful in preparing students for higher level chemistry and physics classes.

Biology     SC200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None
Grades: 9-12

Biology is an introductory laboratory course that develops an understanding and appreciation of the nature of scientific inquiry applied to the study of living things. Students will study major units in ecology, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and physiology. These units are interrelated to develop a comprehensive understanding of the living world. After successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to take higher level life sciences courses like AP biology and honors anatomy & physiology.


Honors Biology     SC250 [This course will not be offered in 2017-18]

Credit: Full year 1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Science 8 (A grade), Algebra 1 (B grade or better)
Grades: 9-12

Honors biology is a laboratory course that develops an understanding and appreciation of the nature of scientific inquiry applied to the study of living things. The honors biology curriculum differs from the on-level curriculum in pace through the topics and the depth with which each of the major topics is covered (ecology, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and physiology). In addition, there will be a dual emphasis placed not only on the laboratory skill development but also on the analysis and communication of information. The laboratory investigations will prepare students for what they will be expected to do in AP biology. Honors biology is for a student who wants to be challenged, is dedicated to working hard, and is strongly considering the higher level life science courses like AP biology or honors anatomy & physiology or has an interest in the health field.

Honors Anatomy & Physiology     SC450 [This course will not be an Honors course for 2017-18]

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Integrated Science, Biology, or Honors Biology (B grade or better)
Grades: 11-12

This course discusses the design (anatomy) of the human body as well as how the human body meets the demands of everyday living (physiology) and how it can be influenced positively to increase efficiency and performance. Honors anatomy & physiology contains rigorous units in cell biology, histology, exercise physiology, and the following body systems: integumentary, nervous, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, and circulatory. It is ideal for students with an interest in medicine, nursing, physical therapy, athletics, and overall wellness. Honors anatomy & physiology requires extensive memorization of body structures and functions and is well-suited for students with strong study skills and good note-taking abilities.

AP Biology     SC510

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology and 1 additional science (preferably Chemistry)
Grades: 11-12

AP biology students must have an understanding of the basics of both biology and chemistry to be successful. Thus, successful completion Chemistry or Honors Chemistry is suggested in addition to the completion of Biology or Honors biology. AP biology is the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year in university. It will include topics regularly contained in a high quality college program in introductory biology, such as biochemistry, cells, metabolism, enzymes, photosynthesis, respiration, cellular energetics, molecular genetics, protein production, heredity, evolution, ecology, as well as an overview of physiology. The aim of the course is to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytic skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.

Chemistry         SC300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Algebra 2 recommended

Grades: 10-12

This course creates a foundation of understanding of the major concept areas in chemistry. Chemistry is a laboratory oriented course and will require students to think through the uses of chemistry in the real world. Major topics include atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, solution chemistry, and thermodynamics. In addition, it will look at the applications of chemistry in society. This course is rigorous and will suit students with strong mathematical and analytical minds.

Honors Chemistry         SC350

Credit:  Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: 9th grade science (with a grade of A), Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 recommended

Grade: 10-12

 

This course is designed to prepare the students for the college level Chemistry and AP Chemistry course.  Students are expected to demonstrate responsibility and maturity to engage in learning activity, finish assignments and lab reports on time.

AP Chemistry         SC520

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry or Chemistry, Algebra 2

Grades: 11-12

AP chemistry is the equivalent of a college introductory chemistry course usually taken by chemistry majors during their first year. AP chemistry emphasizes the ability to apply chemical understanding to new situations and expects a broad understanding of the interconnections present throughout chemistry. Main topics include atomic structure, bonding, gases, solutions chemistry, states of matter, kinetics, equilibrium and acids/bases, thermodynamics as well as organic chemistry. Students will need to have an interest in the material and strong background in both mathematics and chemistry.  Laboratory skills are emphasized, but due to time constraints, will require lab time outside normal school hours.

Physics         SC400

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 recommended

Grades: 10-12

This course will covers the topics of forces and motion, work and energy, electricity and magnetism, waves/optics, thermal energy, digital communication, radioactivity, and cosmology. This course is for students who are keen to understand how and why things work the way they do in the physical world. Although the course is designed to be as conceptually-based as possible, students will need to be comfortable applying algebra and geometry skills in this context. Physics provides a strong foundation for AP physics or may be taken as a stand-alone course.

AP Physics 1     SC530        

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry (A grade in both) and  Algebra 2 (may be concurrent)
Grades: 10-12

This course is equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics, designed to develop deep understanding of the content and to apply that knowledge through inquiry-based labs. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electrical circuits. It may be taken as a stand-alone course without Physics 2. AP Exam available at the end of the year.

AP Physics 2     SC540  [This course will not be offered in 2017-18]        

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: AP Physics 1
Grades: 11-12

This course is the equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics. AP Exam available at the end of the year.

Social Studies

World Geography and Cultures      SS100

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-10 (Required for 9th graders unless excused by Academic Counselor)

This course focuses on the impact physical geography has on the culture, social interactions, politics, economics, and history of regions throughout the world.  It uses the five themes of geography – movement, region, human-environment interaction, location, and place – to structure content. Each unit relies on the framework of a Biblical perspective to understand and evaluate how and why people interact with others and their environment.

World History     SS200

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This survey course encompasses the social, cultural, religious, political, technological, and economic history of the ancient world to modern nations. In addition, students will study major historical events, interactions, and movements such as the Renaissance and Enlightenment. This course will also use a variety of sources to illuminate different perspectives on the material, as well as different methods of approaching the study of history.

United States History     SS300

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 11-12

This course is a chronological survey of events and people that characterize each of the major eras in U.S. history. The eras include: the colonial era, the revolutionary era, nation building, the expanding nation, civil war and reconstruction, westward expansion, turn of the century, the 1920s, the depression and the new deal, World War II and postwar United States, and contemporary US history. The course is designed to be an introduction to US History and provide exposure to the establishment and flow of US history. The course analyzes political, social, economic, religious, and military issues.  All U.S. Citizens must include U.S. History or U.S. Government.  It is strongly recommended that all U.S. citizens take both.

Economics     SS320 (offered 1st semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 11-12

This is an introductory course in economics designed to enable students to achieve a basic understanding of fundamental economic concepts and how these concepts relate to their personal goals, and to the world in which they live. The course will focus on both micro and macroeconomic concepts.

Media Literacy     SS340 (offered 2nd semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12

Media Literacy is an in-depth study of the media environment that surrounds us. The objective of the course is that students will gain the media literacy skills needed to effectively navigate the media centric cultures in which they live. Students will learn how to interact with and critically think about media from the perspective of God’s truth. Media topics covered in the course include: news media, bias in the media, propaganda, advertising, social issues, movies and TV, music, and the internet. Throughout the course students will learn how to access, understand, analyze, evaluate, and create media.

U.S. Government     SS400 [This course will not be offered 2017-18]  

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: US History

Grades: 11-12 (Required for graduation for US citizens beginning with class of 2020)

This course focuses on the legal and historical foundations and major institutions of the United States government, contrasted with other forms of government.  Students are acquainted with the function of democracy by an in-depth study of the three branches of the government, political activity, political parties, and political events. This course enables the student to understand the functions of US national government and how citizens can access the decision making process.   All U.S. Citizens must include U.S. History or U.S. Government.  It is strongly recommended that all U.S. citizens take both.

Comparative Government     SS410 [This course will not be offered 2017-18]  

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisites: US History or World History

Grades: 11-12 (Required for graduation for non-US citizens beginning with class of 2020)

Comparative Government is a course that will provide students with the conceptual tools necessary to develop an understanding of some of the world’s diverse political structures and practices. The course encompasses the study of both specific countries and their governments used to interpret the political relationships and institutions found in virtually all national polities. Five countries form the core of comparative government – Great Britain, France, China, Russia and India. Topics include the sources of public authority and political power, the relationship between state and society, the relationship between citizens and states, political institutions and frameworks, political change, and comparative methodology.

AP World History     SS450

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: World Geography or World History or US History and teacher approval

Grades: 10-12

The AP World History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of world history from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. The course has students investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; development and transformation of social structures) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places encompassing the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Oceania.

AP US History     SS500

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: World History or US History and teacher approval

Grades: 11-12

The AP U.S. History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of American history from approximately 1491 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of U.S. history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides seven themes (American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places. AP U.S. History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. History course.

AP Psychology      SS550

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: World Geography or World History and teacher approval

Grades: 11-12

AP Psychology focuses on the student's ability to actively explore and research major theories, concepts, and themes relevant to the field. The course will focus on the seven themes from the American Psychological Association’s National Standards for High School Curriculum. Content emphasis will be aligned with the expectations set by the College Board. Major areas of study will include the history of psychology, research and statistics, bio‐psychology, cognition, memory and intelligence, personality and development, motivation and emotion, learning theories, abnormal psychology, treatment, and social psychology. Students will have the benefit of teacher‐directed lessons, peer‐to‐peer facilitated learning, and consistent use of the internet.

Educational/ESL Support

Courses listed under this section are available by special arrangement with the Educational Support (ES) Division and the Academic Counselor.  At this time, they will not appear as choices in the online Course Requests in GIS FamilyWeb.  If you feel your student might need to enroll in one or more of these courses in lieu of the equivalent high school course, please contact the Educational Support Division.  Those needing to enroll in one or more of these courses will be scheduled manually by the Academic Counselor.  For students requiring ESL support, tests for incoming and returning students will be used to determine appropriate level of support, and students will also be scheduled manually.

Math Foundations II--Algebra 1        SN096

Math Foundations III--Geometry        SN097

Math Foundations IV--Algebra 2        SN098

Math Foundations V--Pre-Calculus        SN099

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Written approval by parents, math department, and ES Division

Grades 9-12

Math Foundations is a computer-based math program for students in grades 9-12 who are identified as having a math disability, or for those who need more support for mathematics than can be provided in the regular classroom. This class uses grade-level standards while providing individualized pacing, a smaller class size, and extra teacher support. Grades for Math Foundations will be designated as a "modified grade" on transcripts and report cards.

ESL Writing        SN101

Credit: None

Prerequisite: Recommendation of ESL Supervisor

Grades: 9-12

ESL Writing is a course designed to support students’ English language development, specifically in the modality of writing. This class meets weekly and is structured to provide direct instruction, opportunities for practice, and direct feedback on students’ writing. Instruction will include: advanced English language grammar, the formation of complex sentences, incorporation of transition words and phrases, and strategies for composing academic writing in the English language.

ESL Level 4        SN102

Credit: None

Prerequisite: Placement by ESL Supervisor

Grades: 9-10

This course is designed to develop students’ English language proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Through various units of study, students will expand their English vocabulary and usage, become familiar with social idiomatic expressions , and master necessary grammar topics for this level of English development. Grammar topics will include upper-intermediate levels of count and non-count noun forms, complex quantifiers, conditional forms, phrasal verbs, and present tenses. In class, students will be given time to directly apply new information to their current content area studies. In addition, there will be time provided for students to work on homework and receive support as needed.

ESL Level 5        SN103

Credit: None

Prerequisite: Placement by ESL Supervisor

Grades: 9-12

This course is designed to develop students’ English language proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Through various units of study, students will further expand their English vocabulary and usage, become familiar with academic idiomatic expressions , and master necessary grammar topics for this level of English development. Grammar topics will include advanced levels of modal verbs, count and non-count noun forms, transitive and intransitive verb usage, and prepositions. In addition, students will have bi-monthly writing-intensive class time specifically focused on academic writing grammar and strategies.

NILD Discovery, Independent Educational Therapy        SN110

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Identified by teachers and testing, placement by ES Division

Grades: 9-12

For students who are already taking this course continuing from middle school, or who are coming from another school. Students are identified by teachers as having disabilities that would benefit from individualized intervention and which are verified by testing. Frequency and duration--2 times per week for 80 minutes each time.  Time to be scheduled with NILD therapist. Program requires commitment from parent/guardian/ houseparent to assist the student in the Rhythmic Writing Technique outside of class time. Typically a 2-year commitment.  

Life Skills        SN120  [This course will not be offered 2017-18]

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Identified by teachers and recommendation of ES Division

Grades: 11-12

For students in grades 11-12 who are identified by teachers as needing this class.  It helps prepare students for life after high school with learning challenges, whether college or work are pursued.  Students will develop a robust plan for post-secondary life, including short-term and long term goals.  They will identify their personal strengths and areas of growth.  They will learn and practice skills for school and work including interpersonal skills, management skills, consumer skills, independent living in their new environment, and exploring jobs.  

Technical Education

Beginning Tech Ed     TE130

Credits: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course will introduce students to the design process and apply it to the solving of real-life product design problems. They will develop an understanding of the tools, materials, and processes used in the manufacture of their solution. The main materials used will be wood, metal, and plastic. This course uses project-based learning and continual assessment.  Students will develop career awareness as well as DIY skills for the future. There is a written component to the course but the main emphasis is on learning practical skills.

Advanced Tech Ed     TE230

Credits: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Beginning Tech Ed

Grades: 10-12

This course will continue to reinforce the design process and how to apply it to the solving of real-life product design problems. They will develop a deeper understanding of the tools, materials, and processes used in the manufacture of their solution. The main materials used will continue to be wood, metal, and plastic but the degree of difficulty will increase as students’ skill level using the materials and tools increases. This course uses project-based learning and continual assessment.  Students will develop career awareness as well as DIY skills for the future. There is a written component to the course but the main emphasis is on learning practical skills.

*Note:  Drafting courses below meet computer science graduation requirements

Drafting 1--Introduction to Drafting     TE110 (offered 1st semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

This course will be an introduction to engineering and architectural drafting. This course begins with manual drafting to cover some basic drafting and geometric techniques and quickly moves to CAD to apply these techniques using AutoCAD. Students will learn orthographic, isometric, oblique, and perspective representation of objects and be able to draw these manually or using AutoCAD.

Drafting 2--3D AutoCAD     TE210  (offered 2nd semester only)

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Drafting 1

Grades: 9-12

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, understanding, and skills required to produce mechanical and architectural drawings using CAD drawing techniques. Students will learn the different kinds of drawings used in the engineering and construction industry and explore the purpose of each. The student will build upon this knowledge and understanding to explore drawing standards and conventions in common use. They will learn about scales, dimensions, annotation, hatching, projection techniques, and the specific symbols used in the particular disciplines. Most of the work will be done in 3D AutoCAD, and there will be a large emphasis on project-based learning and continual assessment.

 

Honors Drafting 3--Architectural Drafting     TE320

Credit: Full Year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: Drafting 1 and 2

Grades: 10-12

This is an introductory course in architectural graphics and design for the architectural-related professions using the computer software Autodesk Revit. This BIM (Building Information Modeling) software is becoming the industry standard method of producing architectural drawing and in great demand by employers of architectural technologists. The work covered here is currently introduced to students in their architectural courses at university, and we use project-based learning to prepare them for this.  Experiences will include surveying existing structures, sketching design ideas, producing 3D models from existing 2D drawings, proposing new designs, and presenting these ideas using many of the standard architectural drawings used in industry.  This course will emphasize the use of parametric solid modeling for design and documentation.

Honors Drafting 4--Engineering Drafting     TE420

Credit: Full year, 1.0 credit

Prerequisite:  Drafting 1 and 2

Grades:  10-12

This is an introductory course in engineering graphics and design for the engineering-related professions using the computer software Autodesk Inventor. This is becoming the industry standard method of producing engineering drawing. Experiences will include modeling existing consumer products, sketching design ideas, producing 3D models from existing 2D drawings, proposing new designs, and presenting these ideas using many of the standard engineering drawings used in industry.  This course will emphasize the use of parametric solid modeling for design and documentation.

Construction and the Built Environment     TE220  [This course will not be offered 2017-18]  

Credit: One semester or full year, 0.5-1.0 credit

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 10-12

Students will learn, using a hands on approach, how the built environment is constructed. They will dig foundations, mix and place concrete, build walls, cut and bend steel, and make and fit formwork. They will also have opportunity to learn basic electrical, plumbing, and painting skills and while doing so develop their own personal qualities and attitudes essential for success in working life. The course aims to develop and enhance students’ ability in areas of construction and building services through effective use of both the knowledge and skills gained in different parts of the course. It will be fairly fluid in its content and presentation and where possible will use real school construction work to teach and develop the desired practical skills.

Non-Departmental

Student Aide/Teacher’s Assistant     ND100

Credit: One semester, 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Teacher and Counselor approval. It’s recommended that the student has already taken the course or a similar course for which he or she is a TA.

Grades: 9-12

The student will assist a cooperating teacher or staff in their particular course or area of teaching. The student will be under the supervision of the cooperating teacher who will assign work and projects according to their needs and goals. This can include, but is not limited to: clerical work, tutoring, research, and assisting with teaching. Students will be responsible to document work accomplished and write an evaluation of their experience at the conclusion of the term.

Study Hall     ND110

Credit: None

Prerequisite: None

Grades: 9-12

Study hall is a teacher-supervised class period in which students work independently on school work. Study hall is not an academic course and it is not recommended unless a student requires it in his/her schedule.  No credit is earned.  

Tutorial    ND120

Credit: None

Prerequisite:  None

Grades:  9-12

Tutorial is a time scheduled for students to seek out classroom teachers in order to receive additional help on course material or make up missed work due to absence. Students can also use this time to work independently on school work.

Independent Study     Department code 899

Credit: One semester-Full year, 0.5/1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Department approval

Grades: 9-12

Independent courses may be taken in each department with the approval of department head and high school principal or academic counselor.  Independent courses must have a curriculum, assessment, and supervision by a teacher.