DIRECT TO SIGNATURES

Note: This text can be reused as a template for letters to other departments, divisions, universities, etc.

Summary

As undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral scholars of the UCLA Division of Physical Sciences, we call on faculty to immediately address the continued lack of diversity within our division. Although diversity initiatives within the division currently exist, the overwhelming disparity in the representation from People of Color at all levels in our division highlights that these efforts are not enough. We demand that the division takes the initiative to immediately improve upon current efforts to recruit and retain People of Color.

Towards this effort, we demand that graduate students and postdoctoral scholars are included on faculty hiring and student admissions committees. Initiatives to ensure that all members are informed about the holistic review of applications must be taken in forming these committees and graduate students sitting on these committees should be compensated for their efforts.  

                In order to remain transparent about progress towards a more diverse community, the department must annually compile and release data regarding the race and gender demographics of our division and the funding for diversity initiatives. This data should be made available on the division’s diversity webpage.

                We demand that the division actively recruits People of Color. Efforts towards this goal include removing financial barriers for undergraduate and graduate students, prioritizing diversity at recruitment events, and fostering an LGBTQ+ inclusive culture. The university must also work to build collaborative relationships with diversity–driven student organizations and strengthen collaborative relationships with historically Black colleges and universities and local community colleges. Finally, the division should fund student attendance at diversity–oriented conferences and actively identify and support Title I schools.

In addition to actively recruiting People of Color, the division must actively work to retain them by fostering a more inclusive community. This can be done through mandating diversity seminars and integrating topics of inequality into coursework. The division must also increase the funding, recruitment and capacity for programs such as Competitive Edge and offer bridge programs for students to address any inequalities in prior education. The division should also hold quarterly, departmental town hall discussions where students can openly voice any concerns and create transparent processes for reporting and responding to complaints. Finally, we must diversify our diversity committees and withdraw support from organizations that do not reflect university values.

                These actions must be taken on by all faculty and administrators and not just by the diversity committees or Academics of Color. We respectfully request that the Division provides a public response to this letter within two weeks which outlines the Division’s planned actions and how these items will be distributed among administrators and faculty.

June 10, 2020

Dear:

Dr. Miguel A. Garcia-Garibay, Dean of Physical Sciences, UCLA,

Dr. Albert Courey, Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, UCLA,

Dr. Suzanne Paulson, Chair of Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences, UCLA,

Dr. Neil Garg, Chair of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA,

Dr. Edwin Schauble, Chair of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, UCLA,

Dr. Mario Bonk, Chair of Mathematics, UCLA,

Dr. David Saltzberg, Chair of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA,

Dr. Hongquan Xu, Chair of Statistics, UCLA,

And all other Faculty and Administrators of the UCLA Division of Physical Sciences,

We as undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral scholars of the UCLA Division of Physical Sciences are outraged by the continued lack of diversity within the division, the slow progress of current diversity-related initiatives, and the inadequate transparency regarding the funding and impact of these initiatives. 

 

UCLA’s Division of Physical Sciences continuously fails to recruit and retain a diverse population that reflects the demographics of our community. For example, Black Americans account for 6.5% of the CA population, however only about 1% of professors in our division and 3% of graduate and undergraduate students at UCLA are Black. Of all graduate students in STEM in America in 2016, only 0.5% were Black students. Similarly grim statistics are exhibited for academics from other historically marginalized groups. The gross underrepresentation of historically marginalized groups at UCLA, and particularly in the division, is a failure and demonstrates the structural racism present in academic institutions across America. We want to emphasize that this is an issue faced by other top universities nationwide, and is not unique to UCLA. We must immediately address this disparity and, in turn, stand as an example for other universities to follow.

 

We would like to first emphasize that diversity is not just a required section for grants, but an integral part of the health and success of a community. The caliber of scientific research is inextricably linked to the individual scientists involved. Not only are researchers from marginalized groups more likely to tackle significant problems beyond those faced by the white population, but scientists with different perspectives offer new insights and methods towards problem-solving. A more diverse faculty will also serve to inspire and attract students from diverse backgrounds. Most importantly, this will lower the barriers to the retention and success of People of Color.

As an institution, we cannot claim that we stand with the Black Community and against racism in all forms until we look inward and address the ways in which we ourselves are failing. We have outlined actions that must be addressed immediately to support the inclusion of Black students, as well as other historically marginalized groups, within the division. Throughout the letter, we refer to People of Color, but would like to specifically draw attention to the specific relationship Black and Indigenous people have to white supremacy in the United States, and that these groups have been particularly under-represented in STEM. We recognize that many diversity initiatives, including committees, organizations, and funding programs do already exist in the division. Notably, programs like the President’s Postdoctoral Fellow Program and the inclusion of contributions to diversity during faculty performance reviews have made significant impacts. However it is abundantly clear that, while these may have contributed to incremental improvements in the diversity of our community, there remains an overwhelming disparity in the representation from People of Color at all levels of the division. We ask that the division re-evaluate these initiatives and their impact, reallocate funding where necessary and take the initiative to create and implement new programs in spaces where deficits are identified. While this document was thoughtfully crafted, the writers would like to remind those reading that this is by no means an all-encompassing list of action items; new action items must be created as we continually educate ourselves, and as current events affect marginalized groups locally, nationally, and globally.


Table of Contents

I. Accountability of Faculty and Administrators

II. Involve Students in Graduate Student Admissions and Postdoctoral, Staff, and Faculty Hires

Include graduate students and postdoctoral scholars on faculty hiring committees

Include graduate students on graduate student admissions committees

Compensate graduate students and postdoctoral scholars who serve on these committees

III. Compile and Release Data

Compile and release data regarding race and gender demographics

Compile and release data regarding funding for diversity initiatives

IV. Actively Recruit People of Color

Remove financial barriers for undergraduate and graduate students

Prioritize the presence of People of Color at recruitment events

Foster an LGBTQ+ inclusive culture

Build collaborative relationships with diversity–driven student organizations

Strengthen collaborative relationships with historically Black colleges and universities

Strengthen collaborative relationships with community colleges

Fund student attendance at diversity–oriented conferences

Actively identify and support under-resourced schools

V. Actively Retain and Support People of Color

Mandate diversity seminars and integrate topics of inequality into coursework

Expand early support programs for historically marginalized students

Provide consistent platforms for students to discuss their experiences

Create transparent processes for reporting and responding to complaints

Increase funding for organizations of historically marginalized groups and diversity focused groups

Diversify diversity committees

Host mandatory, annual departmental training sessions

Withdraw support from organizations that do not reflect university values

VI. Conclusion

I. Accountability of Faculty and Administrators

As faculty members, administrators, and students of UCLA, it is our collective responsibility to uphold the espoused values of the University. In our mission statement, UCLA claims to strive for “excellence and diversity, recognizing that openness and inclusion produce true quality,” yet the demographics of the faculty and students fail to reflect this value. We must work to immediately address this inconsistency and to lead by example for other universities. As students, we expect our faculty and administrators, the leaders of UCLA, to be accountable for establishing policies and making decisions that improve the inclusion of historically marginalized students at UCLA. To further strengthen the division’s commitment to creating a healthy and diverse community culture, an administrative position should be created and filled by an expert in effective recruitment and retainment practices to advise the division on all matters pertaining to diversity and to create meaningful programing toward this effort.

II. Involve Students in Graduate Student Admissions and Postdoctoral, Staff, and Faculty Hires

  1. Include graduate students and postdoctoral scholars on faculty hiring committees

We demand that graduate students and postdoctoral scholars be included in faculty hiring for their departments at every stage of the process, from reading applicant materials to final decisions. Graduate students who commit to anti-racist hiring practices should be allowed to apply for spots on faculty hiring committees. This approach is currently being used in other departments at UCLA (such as in the Higher Education and Organizational Change division). Alternatively, a panel of graduate students and postdocs could evaluate potential faculty hires as is done at UC Berkeley’s College of Chemistry. Students committees or panels would ensure that student opinions are not ignored in the department’s hiring decisions. Additionally, we demand that students (i.e., graduate and undergraduate) are consistently invited to attend lunch with faculty candidates and have a place to voice their opinions to the administration. These practices will help to ensure that younger and more diverse perspectives are included in hiring decisions. Care should be taken such that these committees acknowledge and address the issues with power dynamics on such committees, and incorporate guidance from the wealth of literature available.

  1. Include graduate students on graduate student admissions committees

Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars should be included on graduate student admissions committees. Graduate students should be allowed to apply to be on these committees and complete trainings on anti-racist, fair, and unbiased admission policies. At least two graduate students and/or postdocs should be included in these committees and given a “vote” such that they can advocate for the acceptance of more diverse students. Initiative must be taken to ensure that all members of admissions committees are informed about holistic review of applications, utilizing already existing NSF funded resources and implicit  bias training. 

  1. Compensate graduate students and postdoctoral scholars who serve on these committees

Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars who serve on these committees should be recognized and/or compensated for this work. These types of appointments could be similar to those that graduate students in the UCLA Chemistry and Biochemistry Department obtain to lead and organize courses on teaching during orientation. Alternatively, stipends supplementing a student’s standard income should be provided as compensation for this work.

III. Compile and Release Data

  1. Compile and release data regarding race and gender demographics

We demand the compilation and release of data detailing the race and gender of students who have applied, been admitted, enrolled, and graduated from graduate studies in the physical sciences division. While some of this data is already publicly available, it is inconsistently reported and undescriptive. For example, the student category “Domestic Underrepresented Minorities (URM)” is too general and should be further broken down by race. If similar data is available for LGBTQ+ students, we demand that this data is released. If data on LGBTQ+ students is not available, we demand that such data be collected and released moving forward. We also demand the release of data regarding graduation progress (i.e, the time left for students to finish qualifying exams, to advance to candidacy, and  to complete a dissertation) that are currently unavailable to help understand issues with retention. Further, we demand that the data released be completely transparent on the statistics for all marginalized communities. Verbiage found in the currently published data such as “other” and “less than 10” is vague and obfuscates proper understanding and analysis of the data. Inaccurate designations such as “African American” in place of “Black” should be avoided. The released data should be in an accessible form on the Division’s diversity webpage and should not be kept in graphs or spreadsheets that individuals cannot download. It should be updated annually.

  1. Compile and release data regarding funding for diversity initiatives

We demand data be released about funding towards the overall diversity initiative in the physical sciences division. Within this demand we would like a concise breakdown of how and where current funds are distributed. This data should be accompanied by a written statement of your perceived impact of these budget choices on historically marginalized groups in academia. Additionally, we demand information regarding faculty who participate in diversity committees and the extent of their monetary compensation. Paid or not, these faculty members must be held to a standard, and a record of their efforts and impact towards diversity must be documented and available to the public. Beyond the allocation of money already available, we demand more money be sourced to expand diversity efforts. In this spirit, we suggest chair money be redirected from prestigious and tenured professors, whose careers would not be endangered by the loss of funds, towards the diversity initiative, and towards fellowships that directly benefit Students of Color.

IV. Actively Recruit People of Color

  1. Remove financial barriers for undergraduate and graduate students

        Research demonstrates that low socio-economic status is one of the biggest barriers to STEM participation. We demand a more inclusive admissions process. Namely, to reduce the financial barriers for potential applicants, the division must make the standardized testing requirement for undergraduate and graduate admissions optional, and the absence of standardized testing scores should not negatively affect an admission decision. The division should also waive application fees for applicants with low socioeconomic status or waive application fees altogether. While there are processes to obtain application fee waivers currently in place, these are often cumbersome for students to complete and pose an additional burden to already disadvantaged students as they must devote additional time and energy to these processes. Furthermore, the division should invest in more fellowship programs to pay historically marginalized undergraduate students working in research labs. This would motivate undergraduate students, especially those struggling to financially support themselves, to participate in research. When implementing new processes, procedures, or programs which require a financial obligation, it is imperative that the division remain mindful of the negative impact disproportionately placed on Communities of Color.

  1. Prioritize the presence of People of Color at recruitment events

A key aspect of attracting underrepresented students to institutions of higher education is a greater representation of these populations during recruitment. Naturally, if these student bodies do not exist, then it may be more difficult in ongoing recruitment efforts. To this end, admit more students from historically marginalized communities each year. This will have an immediate effect and will create sustainable changes to increase and embrace diversity in the physical sciences. In order to increase the diversity of our student body, the department needs to deliberately identify the types of students we want to attract to our department. To do so, the preemptive action of encouraging Students of Color to apply and ultimately accepting and retaining them, must be a continuous effort. The culture of the department must reflect a safe and supportive space for students from historically marginalized groups. Diversity and inclusion initiatives during recruitment events need to be met with action items such as implementing a committee of grad students that will meet with faculty and grad division offices to improve upon current recruitment practices, prioritizing the formation of relationships between admitted students and current members of the department before, during, and after recruitment visits, and an acknowledgement of department practices that foster inclusive work and learning environments. As with students who serve on hiring and admissions committees, students that serve on recruitment committees should be financially compensated for their efforts.

  1. Foster an LGBTQ+ inclusive culture 

We recognize that intersectional identities contribute to students being marginalized and efforts that focus on diversity must address these intersectionalities. Departments must be more inclusive of LGBTQ+ people. In order to do this departments should:

  • Use gender inclusive language (they instead of he/she or just he, partner or significant other)
  • Normalize asking for pronouns during class introductions and at seminars
  • Normalize the inclusion of pronouns in email signatures and in official communications
  • Include space on badges for pronouns
  • Clearly identify, offer directions to, and promote gender neutral restrooms in buildings

  1. Build collaborative relationships with diversity–driven student organizations

Similarly, the division must commit to building relationships with organizations such as NOBCChE (National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers) and SACNAS (Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science). These organizations assist Black, Hispanic and other marginalized scientists in fully realizing their professional pursuits.

  1. Strengthen collaborative relationships with historically Black colleges and universities

A step towards active recruitment of undergraduate students from historically marginalized groups is the development of collaborative relationships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). This will involve the implementation of Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) students at HBCUs to become connected with research faculty at UCLA. While a similar program currently exists in the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, it must be improved upon to involve a more impactful form of social support for the visiting scholars and recruitment efforts must be drastically amplified to include active networking and collaboration. This involves sending graduate students from UCLA to partner with faculty at HBCUs on collaborative projects and maintaining contact with students through healthy relationships of mentorship, follow-up regarding research updates, and assisting with progress through their undergraduate career.

  1. Strengthen collaborative relationships with community colleges  

An enhanced effort should be made to recruit from the communities of diverse students that attend community colleges.  One example is Los Angeles City College which not only boasts a minority enrollment of 78% (higher than the 68% average of California), but is also currently housed on the original UCLA campus.  While the university has in place programs like the Transfer Alliance Program (TAP) and the Student Transfer Outreach Mentorship Program (STOMP), the division should prioritize the long term relationships with these students in the form of career mentorship, opportunities for funding to work in research labs, and academic support, including but not limited to fully funded tutoring services provided by graduate students compensated by the division. The collaborative spirit of these partnerships should also be advertised to high school students, as this may encourage students to pursue higher education and promote the continuation of their education to the post-secondary level.  This will not only increase the diversity of applicants, but also show that they are valued within the academic community by a large, high-ranking institution.  This support is crucial in making larger impacts across the nation and should be pioneered by such institutions, ie. UCLA, who have the resources to incite this change throughout academia.

  1. Fund student attendance at diversity–oriented conferences

To diversify the application pool of the Division of Physical sciences, we demand permanent funding for diversity-oriented student organizations to send several PhD students and a professor to diversity-oriented conferences such as:

  • Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS)
  • National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBBCChE)
  • Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS)
  • National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE)
  • National Organization of Gay and Lesbian Scientists and Technical Professionals (NOGLSTP)
  • Out in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (oSTEM)
  • National Associate for Black Geoscientists (NABG)
  • American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES)

 This provides an opportunity to recruit students attending the conferences as representatives from our departments can express interest in these students and allow students to ask questions about the graduate program and life at UCLA, projecting a positive light on the diversity of the division as a whole. The event will also be enriching for the graduate student members who are selected to attend the conference as they will present their research, network with those in and beyond their own fields, and seek recruitment for jobs.

  1. Actively identify and support under-resourced schools

In order to create an effective pipeline from elementary school to high school to graduate programs and beyond, we demand a commitment to an annual, recurring budget for the long term recruitment of marginalized students from under-resourced primary and secondary schools around the Los Angeles area. We believe that UCLA is capable of investing more time and money into initiatives targeting local Title I schools. Thoughtful distribution of funds toward outreach to local Title I schools would allow for the initial recruitment step for the higher education pipeline. Initiatives involving these programs would engage and introduce young students to the opportunities available to them in STEM, however, the priority of these programs should be to build relationships with these students and their schools to provide the necessary and lasting support throughout their education and foster their future success as scientists. Allocation of budgets for such initiatives should ensure that these programs do not present a financial burden to the students attending in any way and should properly financially compensate for graduate student and postdoctoral mentors.

V. Actively Retain and Support People of Color

  1. Mandate diversity seminars and integrate topics of inequality into coursework

We demand that you integrate graduate classes and invited lectures with topics that focus on historically marginalized communities. There is a temptation in scientific fields to assume that we are entirely separate from ‘political’, or human topics, but this leaves out critical information for the advancement of the fields. For example, discussions of how climate impacts disproportionately harm poor communities and Communities of Color, as well as eco-racism, are lacking from the core curriculum in the EPSS and AOS departments. Departments should be including conversations on barriers certain groups have to their advancement in academia, what can be done about it, and the fact that diverse groups of scientists produce better scientists. We demand that:

  • Departments with seminar series include at least one seminar per year that directly focuses on topics affecting historically marginalized communities
  • Departments with seminar series have more invited speakers from historically marginalized backgrounds (MINIMUM one per quarter)
  • Departments require undergraduate and graduate students to take at least one course that directly deals with topics from historically marginalized communities as they relate to their field of discipline. This can also be integrated into the core classes that the department offers.

  1. Expand early support programs for historically marginalized students

It is absolutely imperative that students from historically marginalized communities receive support from the minute that they are accepted to UCLA, as lack of support greatly contributes to a student’s decision to leave the program before degree conferral. The division must increase the funding, recruitment, and capacity of Competitive Edge or similar programs to ensure that students from historically marginalized communities are given the proper resources to excel in graduate school.  

A large roadblock for marginalized communities to attend graduate school is the lack of access to classes that are required or highly suggested in preparation for the graduate curriculum. Thus, existing programs must be expanded to offer a bridge program wherein the university provides a fully funded curriculum to address any inequities in prior education. This curriculum should also prioritize an emphasis on diversity in order to establish a trustworthy support system early on. Additionally, the division should implement a mentorship program that allows students from historically marginalized communities to be paired with faculty or peer mentors within the Division, separate from their research mentor, who is either representative of a historically marginalized community or a certified ally of such community and who is there to support the student throughout their graduate studies on an academic and personal level.

  1. Provide consistent platforms for students to discuss their experiences

                To understand what we can do to create a more diverse, inclusive, and equitable division, we must directly ask students from historically marginalized communities about their experiences in the division. The following items should be done:

  • Send separate, optionally anonymous surveys to undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral scholars (especially from historically marginalized groups) annually. Specifically ask about the department as well as their research labs and advisors; ask them what their experiences are/were, both positive and negative.  Do this for current scholars as well as alumni.
  • Hold quarterly town hall discussions in each department specifically on these topics. Gather faculty, staff, alumni, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, and undergraduate students to discuss ways to promote inclusivity and belonging in the departments. Annual discussions should be held between division faculty to learn from other departments.
  • Require quarterly meetings between aforementioned mentors and physical sciences administration members. These discussions should be collaborative efforts that focus on how to improve the efficacy of the mentorship program and how to implement these improvements.
  • Hold Principal Investigators accountable for maintaining safe, inclusive lab environments. Safety is not just using PPE: safety is also emotional. Mandate that labs conduct quarterly, optionally anonymous evaluations that assess Principal Investigator mentorship and lab culture as well as offer suggestions for improvement.

 

It is important to emphasize that these efforts and good intentions must be met with action based on responses and input. We urge that meetings between lab groups and administration are held to ensure this effort is collaborative and voices are heard and responded to.

  1. Create transparent processes for reporting and responding to complaints

Identify particular departments which have legacies of elevating harmful community members and ignoring complaints made by students, staff, or other faculty. Create an anti-racist and anti-discriminatory code of conduct with actionable repercussions for violations that all members of the department are required to sign, and a method to keep all members accountable regardless of the current career level. In doing so, departmental leadership is responsible for:

  • Communicating and coordinating discussions outlining what is expected of members of the department in the code of conduct at faculty and departmental meetings
  • Implementing processes for reporting violations that keep reportees safe from retaliation
  • Designating a person on the staff who is in charge of managing all incidents, and notify all members of the department regarding their duties
  • Taking all necessary measures to support victims of racist and discriminatory incidents
  • Following through on all outlined consequences to all racist and discriminatory incidents as outlined by the code
  • Sending an annual report to the faculty, students, and staff outlining all incidents reported to the department, along with how the department managed all incidents to increase transparency in the process

  1. Increase funding for organizations of historically marginalized groups and diversity focused groups

                We demand that you take inventory of the current amount of and distribution of funds allocated to support organizations of historically marginalized groups and diversity-focused groups. While we are unsure which groups are currently funded, as the UCLA College of Physical Sciences Diversity webpage is out-of-date, based on the current list of organizations, we suggest providing permanent funding to the Center for Diverse Leadership in Science, the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science at UCLA (SACNAS), as well as other groups specifically dedicated to the advancement of Black, Indigenous, Pacific Islander, Latinx, and Hispanic STEM students. Furthermore, funds and additional resources should be allocated for UCLA’s Black Resource Center. The Division would be joining David Geffen School of Medicine and the Division of Undergraduate Education in providing recurring annual sponsorships to organizations such as SACNAS. Without financial support from Physical Sciences, it is difficult to target students within the Division and thus goes on to further contribute to lack of resources and recruitment to our departments. Funding diversity oriented organizations would enhance recruitment and retainment of students by supporting established, student coordinated events.

Additionally, the Diversity web page must be updated annually and in a more meaningful way than its current state;  include actions that are currently being implemented in the division with more information. For example, the webpage refers to an annual workshop entitled “Enhancing Student Success in Science”, but does not include any additional information about the workshop, which students, faculty, and staff attended, or any outcomes.

  1. Diversify diversity committees

 

                We demand a more thoughtful selection of members on diversity committees to better represent students and faculty from historically marginalized communities. Providing a voice at the table to members with diverse backgrounds is essential to creating an inclusive and equitable space in the division. While there is some diversity on the committee, it must be improved. For instance, to our knowledge, there is currently no Black, LGBTQ+, or Indigenous representation in the Division’s diversity group. Additionally, we suggest partnering with groups that focus on diversity such as the Black Graduate Student Association, Queer and Trans in STEM, American Indian Graduate Student Association, Grad Students of Color, etc.

        Additionally, all departments within the division should have internal diversity committees that help assist in the hiring process of faculty, recruitment, and admission of graduate students. The committees should be led by faculty but decision-making processes should include undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral scholars as well. It should be required that members of these committees are formally trained and that student members are financially compensated for their work.

It is important to note that while the voices of diverse members of our community are invaluable in providing perspective, we must also recognize that the current scarcity of community members representing historically marginalized communities leaves an enormous burden to many of our diverse faculty, administrators, and students that are asked to join several committees at once. This can simply be remedied by recruiting and retaining more individuals from diverse backgrounds, but until that is achieved, these committee positions can be filled with empathetic allies which have received appropriate training.

  1. Host mandatory, annual departmental training sessions

        We demand that the Division work with the Campus Human Resources, Staff Diversity and AA/EEO Compliance Office to create a series of training for all departments within the Division to give faculty, students, and staff resources for effective allyship. Focus on sensitivity and implicit bias training for faculty and staff so that they encourage all of their students, not just specific groups. Implicit bias training can be extended to the classroom, using apps such as EQUIP (For thoughts, the division can reach out to San Diego State’s Math department which has already implemented this app in classrooms to train professors). With this training, create ally packets and specific resources for all members of the division through active learning training techniques which have been shown to increase retention in learning.

        Furthermore, we demand that climate assessments be conducted on a 2-5 year basis, in each department and division-wide, to inform the type of focused training for each department. These trainings can be used to inform the anti-racist and anti-discriminatory codes of conduct, described in section D.

  1. Withdraw support from organizations that do not reflect university values

Angewandte Chemie recently accepted an article entitled “‘Organic Synthesis - Where now?’ is thirty years old. A reflection on the current state of affairs” by Tomas Hudlicky. This article makes the case that “diversity of the workforce” has a “negative impact” on organic synthesis. This toxic viewpoint is in direct contrast to the values that UCLA claims to uphold. UCLA scientists must cease all submission to this journal and refuse to support it.

VI. Conclusion

As scientists, we often collaborate with those in other STEM fields to obtain expertise in areas we are not familiar with--the same can be and should be extended to collaborations to address the issues outlined here. Collaborating with other departments such as the Higher Education and Organizational Change (HEOC) division on campus, where faculty and graduate students are already studying how these issues can be addressed, will only strengthen our knowledge and success at creating effective change in the Division. Faculty and administrators should then analyze the effectiveness of their actions and make the analyses widely available for our own university as well as other universities. We must make it clear that we have put action behind UCLA’s own words, “excellence and diversity, recognizing that openness and inclusion produce true quality.”

Most importantly, these actions must be taken on by all faculty and administrators and not just the diversity committees or academics from marginalized groups. While the voices of People of Color must be heard, we must not make them do the work for the division. Faculty and administrators must hold themselves and each other accountable. We know that our division has a standard of excellence when it comes to research. It is now time for the UCLA Division of Physical Sciences leaders to demonstrate that excellence encompasses all students, postdoctoral scholars, staff, faculty, and administrators, not just a select group.

We recognize that accomplishing some of these actions will require collaboration with the graduate students and postdoctoral scholars, however we demand that the faculty act as leaders and demonstrate their commitment to diversity by leveraging their position within the university to make effective change. We also recognize that it may take time for some of these action items to be meaningfully accomplished, however we do believe that several of these items can be swiftly implemented. We respectfully request that the division (1) organizes a widely advertised town hall to discuss racial injustices wherein the attendance of departmental chairs is mandatory (within 1 week), (2) provides the data requested in section III (within 2 weeks), and (3) provides a public response to this letter which outlines the Division’s planned actions including how actions will be distributed among administrators and faculty, timelines towards those actions, success indicators for these actions, and a discussion of how the Division will involve graduate students and postdoctoral scholars where requested (within 2 weeks).

The writers would like to thank the faculty and the HEOC academics who contributed to this letter through their guidance and thoughtful conversations.  

The following UCLA undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, organizations, and additional supporters have co-signed this letter:

CLICK HERE TO SIGN(Note your signature will be delayed in appearing below)

Bolded signatures correspond to individuals which directly contributed to the writing of this letter

Name

Affiliation

Department

Priera Panescu

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

UCLA's Organization for Culture Diversity in Science

Organization, UCLA

N/A

Ani Mustafa

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Hannah Friedman

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Hayden Montgomery

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Jordyn Moscoso

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Katie Spence

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Kelly Wong

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Margeaux Miller

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Maria Flores

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Michael LeClaire

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Natalie Schibrowsky

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Samantha Theresa Mensah

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Eleni Kyriazi

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Zoe Pierrat

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

SACNAS at UCLA

Organization, UCLA

N/A

Eun Bin Go

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Daniel Robertson

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Tanner Waters

Graduate Student, UCLA

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Kaia Yager

Undergraduate, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Robert Nguyen Ulrich

Graduate Student, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Jane Yang

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Vivian Wall

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Jessica Heckman

Graduate Student, UCLA

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Shaun Howard

Undergraduate, UCLA

School of Engineering

Theo Demangos

Undergraduate, UCLA

Materials Science and Engineering

Ari Schaler

Graduate Student, UCLA

NSIDP

Anne Marie Kelley-Cosio

Fellow CDLS, IoES dept

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Naomi Adams

Graduate Student, UCLA

Environmental Engineering

Ileana Callejas

Graduate Student, UCLA

Civil Engineering

Ethan Rosser

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Ikechukwu Okorafor

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Paheli Desai-Chowdhry

Graduate Student, UCLA

Computational Medicine

Society of Women Geoscientists

Organization, UCLA

N/A

Gabriel Gorelick

Graduate Student, UCLA

Materials Science

Natalie Kashanchi

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Eva Mars

Undergraduate, UCLA

Mathematics

Katie Perrotta

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Danielle Hoague

Graduate Student, UCLA

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Alexander Johnson

Graduate Student, UCLA

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Adrik Shamlonian

Undergraduate, UCLA

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Blanca Alvarez Caraveo

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Thomas R. Look

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Christoffer Caro

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dylan Valencia

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Claire Dickerson

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Marco Messina

Graduate Student Alumni, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Deepshikha Upadhyay

Graduate Student, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Omar Leon Ruiz

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Austin Bailey

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Kathleen Chen

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Paige Hoel

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Sarah Worden

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Diana Azurdia, PhD

UCLA Administrator and UCLA Physical Sciences Alumni

N/A

Jason Chari

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Katherine Bay

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Jingyou Rao

Undergraduate, UCLA

Computer Science

Ashley Hoffmann

Alumni, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Daniel Clements

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Cameron Movassaghi

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Rachel Cohn

Undergraduate, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Stephanie Tenney

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Kira Hart

Alumna, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Siobhan McCarthy

Alumni, UCLA

Neuroscience

Anasazi Levy

Alumna, UCLA

Communication Studies

Andrew Kelleghan

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Jessica Zeng

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Elisha Jhoti

Graduate Student, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Victoria Basile

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Zach Hern

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Shauna Burr

Alumna, UCLA

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Daniele Bianchi

Assistant Professor

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

De’Marcus Robinson

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Alexandrea Arnold

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Kelsey Warren

Undergraduate, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Sarah Anthony

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Luke J. Sisto

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Billy Treacy

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Kevin Clutario

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Francisco Spaulding-Astudillo

Graduate Student, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Kyle Callahan

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Emily Hawkins

Graduate Student, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Todd Emmenegger

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Hannah Bailey

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Francesca Ippoliti

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Xinxin Ye

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Isabella Trierweiler

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Kyongwon Yoo

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Maeve Nagle

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Ana Bulger

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Ivan Ramirez

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Rohan Tonk

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Melinda Berman

Undergraduate, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Rachael Day

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Martina Bass

Undergraduate, UCLA

Global Studies

Paul Stainier

Graduate Student, UCLA

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Kathryn Messina

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Wendell Alejandro Scott

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Jesus Perez

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Brennan Clement

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Noah Alviz

Undergraduate, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Brandon Jolly

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Allison Hacker

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Santiago Vargas

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Henry H. Wong

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Will Krantz

Graduate Student, UCLA

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Anu Deshmukh

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Joshua Larson

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Ellen Alexander

Alumna, UCLA EPSS

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Chloe Williams

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Hannah Tandy

Graduate Student, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Center for Diverse Leadership in Science

Organization, UCLA

N/A

Aradhna Tripati

Faculty, UCLA

AOS, EPSS, IoES

Robert Eagle

Faculty

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Dayanni Bhagwandin

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Briley Lewis

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Heidi L. van de Wouw

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Renee Delamater

Undergraduate, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Ashley Shin

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Cheylene Tanimoto

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Tyler Lam

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Maxx Tepper

Alumni, Staff

Physics & Astronomy

Ghattas Malki

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Michael D. Guile

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Jewel Abbate

Graduate Student, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Sean Atamdede

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Samuel Baugh

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Laura Thapa

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Queer and Trans in STEM

Organization, UCLA

N/A

Grace Kunkel

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Lisa Pangilinan

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Anthony Spearman

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Jennifer Ngo

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Richard Mebane

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Adam Trapp

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Nicole Lynn

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Kaylie Bair

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Charlene Salamat

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Melissa Ramirez

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Oscar Molina

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Spencer Frei

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Valeria Jaramillo

Graduate Student, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Sepand Nistanaki

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Hosea M.Nelson

Assistant Professor, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Lily K. Sloan

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Tanya Hadjian

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Daniel McCoy

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Logan Richards

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Marcus Gallagher-Jones

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Calvin Howes

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Sarah Chase

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Melody Huang

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Jay Green

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Josh Karam

Graduate Student, UCLA

Bioengineering

Ami Wulf

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Students of Color and Ally Leadership

Organization, UCLA

N/A

Stephanie Stacy

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Gilberto Alvarado

Concerned Citizen

None.

Georgina Garcia-Obledo

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Emily Cosco

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

J. Rachel Prado

Former Cram Teacher-Scholar

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Pedro de la cueva

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Rohan Tonk

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Abhimat K. Gautam

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Conor Kresin

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Barry Lee

Concerned Citizen

Mathematics

Daniel Ochoa

A normal human being

None

Eduardo Munguia

Alumna, UCLA

Statistics

Umang Shab

Concerned Citizen

NA

Siobhan Braybrook

Assistant Professor, UCLA

MCDB and Bioengineering

David Boyer

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Joy White

UCLA Student Affiliate

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Matthew McVeigh

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Evan Takayoshi

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Alexander Umanzor

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Lisa Kawakami

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Mariah Gomez

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Vivian Dao

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Alice Ma

Alumni

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Kyle Meador

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Seth Axen

Alumni, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Daniella Duran

Alumna

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Yutong Wu

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Nathaniel Brockway

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Nicholas Ortega

Undergraduate, UCLA

Statistics

Sergio Garcia

Undergraduate, UCLA

Public Affairs

Gisselle Cortez

Undergraduate, UCLA

International Development Studies

Women in the Physical Sciences

Organization, UCLA

N/A

Daphne Chen

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Jordan Bretzfelder

Graduate Student, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Therese Manesia Cook

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Daniel Medina Garate

Undergraduate, UCLA

Mathematics

Jorge Cardenas

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Veronica Dike

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Christian Cruz

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chicanx Studies

Katie Duong

Undergraduate, UCLA

Society and Genetics

Morgan Howe

Alumna, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Anna Kataki

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Diana Garcia

Alumna/Staff

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Isaac Benavides

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Bryan Christian

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Heather Tienson-Tseng

Lecturer, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Roberto Chavez

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Alexandria Herr

Graduate Student, UCLA

Geography

Dennise Valadez

Post-Bachelor , UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Kyle Ferguson

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Sissy Wamaitha

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology

Sofia Odeste

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Sergio Garcia

Undergraduate, UCLA

Public Affairs

Gisselle Cortez

Undergraduate, UCLA

International Development Studies

Jason Schuchardt

Graduate Student, UCLA

Mathematics

Karina Barboza

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Sonia Chung

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Katie Tuite

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Kelly O'Neil

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Karina Barboza

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Dr. Guillaume Urtecho

UCLA Graduate Alumni

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Karen Shure

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Joan Jungbin Lee

Admin Staff, Electric Girls

Engineering

BiochemASE

Organization, UCLA

N/A

David Hamilton

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Gabriel Ruiz

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Daniele Vinciguerra

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Christopher Strohmeier

Graduate Student, UCLA

Mathematics

Dominic Reiss

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Sarita Lee

Undergraduate, UCLA

Statistics

Denali Molitor

Graduate Student, UCLA

Mathematics

Isis Frausto-Vicencio

Alumni 2017

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Frederick Vu

Graduate Student, UCLA

Mathematics

Fernanda Silva Celaya

Graduate Student, UCLA

Dentistry

Isis Frausto-Vicencio

Alumna, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Karla Lopez Sanchez

UCLA Alumna

Electrical Engineering

Erin Raisa Soriano

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Yasmin binti Ahmad Rizal

Undergraduate, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Jena Shields

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Ryan Rizeq

Alumnus, UCLA

Civil & Environmental Engineering

Georgia Strafacce Costa

UCLA Alum

Geography

Jamie Haddock

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Mathematics

Vincent Illescas

Alumni, UCLA 2017

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Michelle Feng

Graduate Student, UCLA

Mathematics

Elisa Ekalestari

Alumna, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Hannah Bailey

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Madeline Gelb

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Isabel Angelo

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Bakur Madini

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Roshni Rao

Undergraduate, UCLA

Mathematics

Arabi Seshappan

Alumna, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Erika Medina

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Maxine Dalton

Undergraduate, UCLA

Mathematics

Ryan Arellano

Graduate Alumni

Statistics

Allen Yu-Lun Liang

Alumni

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Evelyn Hernandez

Alumni

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Onyambu Onyancha

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Sylvia Chow

Alumna, Physics and Astronomy

Physics & Astronomy

Pratik Manwani

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Jumanah Malibari

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Jeanne Gandon

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

David Reilley

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Rohan Tonk

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Phoebe Miller

Undergraduate, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Jackie Chen

Undergraduate, UCLA

Mathematics

Jackson Darke

Graduate Student, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Adeyemi Adebiyi

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Graduate Biochemistry Student Organization

Organization, UCLA

N/A

Leonard Wainstein

Graduate Student, UCLA

Statistics

Yhoshua Wug

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Mary Grumbles

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

James Carbin

Graduate Student, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Julianna Persaud

Person of Colour

N/A

Abigail Sanders

Undergraduate, UCLA

Life Sciences

Christopher Hernandez

Undergraduate, UCLA

Physics & Astronomy

Joanna Itzel Navarro

Graduate Student, UCLA

Computer Science

Rolando de Santiago

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Mathematics

Steven Lopez

Alumni UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Nickie Cammisa

Graduate Student, UCLA

IoES

Kaylie Cohanim

Alumna, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Rebecca Jenkins

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Jason Guerrero

Undergraduate, UCLA

Mathematics

Jerome Guiet

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Irene Lim

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Isabel Ketner

Undergraduate, UCLA

Computer Engineering

John Brewer

Graduate Student, UCLA

Materials Science and Engineering

Russell Horowitz

Graduate Student, UCLA

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Erika Aguiluz

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Emilie Dunham

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Sarah Castillo

Undergraduate, UCLA

Computer Science

Randon Flores

Lab assistant, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Kevin Cannon

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Morgan Carrington

Undergraduate, UCLA

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Eric Jinsuk Lee

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Roderic O'Connor

IT Director, EPSS

Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences

Jessica V. Fayne

Graduate Student, UCLA

Geography

Rohan Tonk

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Alejandra Pesqueira

Alumna, UCLA

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Rohan Tonk

Undergraduate, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Saken Sherkhanov

Post Doctoral Scholar, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Jessica Ochoa

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Amanda Freise, PhD

Lecturer, UCLA

Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics

Heta Desai

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Yuting Miao

Graduate Student, UCLA

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Gisselle Cortez

Undergraduate, UCLA

International Development Studies