Overview

Course Objective:

1. SWBAT compare and contrast the features of narrative, informative, and persuasive writings (Common Core R-1)

2. SWBAT identify and utilize specific strategies to decode each type of writing style so that they can demonstrate comprehension of grade level readings and beyond. (adheres to Common Core RF 5.4)

3. SWBAT write informative, narrative, and persuasive essays. (Common Core W - 6.1, 6.2, 6.3)


The 5 day plan below will be the first full unit of the year for 6th grade reading at Jesuit Academy.  It will utilize our new reading series - Holt-McDougal - Literature.  This will be taught during the second full week of school - much of the first week and a half will be focused on teaching students the technology skills required for some of the activities.

Class Name: Reading

Age Group: 6th Grade

Unit Objective: SWBAT explain the three purposes for which author’s write (entertain, inform, persuade) and describe how identifying the specific type of writing can help the reader’s comprehension.

Lesson Objective

Tasks

Assessments

M

SWBAT identify the three purposes for which authors write.

Whole group:

- Random athletic equipment and pieces of writing on student desks

- Discuss what athletic equipment is used for; Would you use a football at a baseball game?

- Discuss the different texts on student desks; Does each text have the same purpose? Would you read a novel to find out a basketball score?

Independent Practice:

- 3 columns - Inform,Persuade, Entertain

- Watch teacher slide show and identify each text as I/P/or E on paper (or computer; Socrative)

- Assessment

Create your own slideshow with pics of informative, persuasive, and narrative texts

T

SWBAT compare and contrast the three purposes for writing.

Whole group/Individual

- Show 3 sample student slideshows from previous day’s assessment

- Review as group the three purposes

Small Groups (rotation stations every 7 minutes)

- Computer group completes interactive here

- Desk Work - Free reading time

- Teacher group - Samples of what would or would not be in a type of text. Students respond on whiteboards. (i.e. - Wikipedia is an example of what type of text?)

Edmodo entry on what you did at each station (more than one sentence per station)

* Non-tech alternatives include paper journals and only two groups (1 free read, 1 w/teacher instead of computer group)

W

SWBAT subcategorize genres within different types of texts.

Independent Practice:

- Duplicate, fill in, and share spiderscribe chart

- Identify subcategories of each text type

Whole Group:

- Read p. 4 in Holt/McDougal lit book

- Discuss, then add subtract bubbles based on what you’ve read

Sub-groups (done individually)

- Each group will find an as many examples of the particular genre in their book and write down the page number

- 5 minute time limit

- Share with whole group

Add the examples of the genre you found to your SpiderScribe.

* Non-tech alternative is to create the bubble chart on bubbl.us and print it on paper for students to fill out.

Th

SWBAT explain how identifying the author’s purpose can be used to help them read more effectively.

Whole Group:

- Compare and contrast the bullet points on p. 5,7,8 of the book; Discuss as class the differences

- Read Number the Stars excerpt p. 5 focus on fear and character

- Read the Meteors excerpt on p. 9 and compare to Number stars

- Show basketball and football and draw parallel to different text structures.

Independent Practice:

- Quizlet review of texts

Study for quiz

F

↓↓

Quiz

Quiz

This represents a sample  unit from the course of study.  We will rotate through each of the text types throughout the year and I will spend 2-3 weeks on each type before moving to the next.  Most likely, I’ll use this as the first unit on narrative text.

Class Name: Reading

Age Group: 6th Grade

Unit Objective: SWBAT analyze narrative texts by identifying text features including the characters, plot, setting, and attempts to solve the problem.

Long Term Project: Create your own Encyclopedia Brown adventure with the EB characters and ones you have invented on your own.

Lesson Objective

Tasks

Assessments

M

SWBAT identify the main features of a narrative text.

Whole Group/Small Group:

- Identify parts of a story as whole group

- ½ Create signs with part titles (Problem, Characters, Setting, etc.)

- ½ with me to breakdown parts of the story and add to notes sheet (Character = how they look, things they say, where they live, job, friends, enemies)

- Switch groups after 10 minutes

Independent Work:

- Read: It’s Getting Hot In Here

- Complete 4 panel draw along of what happens

Answer Hot in Here questions and complete draw along

T

SWBAT describe and draw their interpretation of the setting in several stories

Whole Group:

- Watch video of It’s Getting Hot in Here and compare to draw alongs

- Stress importance of visualizing the action while reading

Independent Work:

- On notecard, draw a two panel picture of something that happened to them in summer and winter, include a caption

- Share notecards

Whole group:

- Overview of Encyclopedia Brown

- Read Mystery 1 in first book and tell students to create the picture of the setting in their mind.

- HW

Re-read 1st mystery of Encyclopedia Brown book and complete 4 pictures describing different settings, with captions about the action in the book

W

SWBAT identify and describe the traits of characters in the Encyclopedia Brown series.

- Add setting notecards to the Setting poster

Whole group:

- Review setting

- Discuss character traits and snap photo of students showing different character traits (smart, clumsy, strong, mischevious)

Small groups (rotate every 8 min):

Group 1 - On computers making slideshow of 3 character traits from class photos

Group 2 - Creating character chart on notesheet of Encyclopedia Brown characters with me; add to Character chart

Group 3 - Independent reading

Complete character chart and share on Google Docs

Th

↓↓

Quiz

Whole group:

- Review characters from Encyclopedia Brown

- Read mystery 2 (teacher led); class does draw along of setting on top half of notecard and characters on bottom half of card

Independent:

- Add new characters to notes list w/description

- Use Voki to create a speaking avatar of one of the characters

Create Voki speaking avatar of one of the EB characters

F

SWBAT explain the narrative structure and identify where the setting, characters, and problem are introduced.

Whole group:

- Show select avatars

- Overview of the “problem” in a story

- Review problems in first two stories; Were they found at the beginning or end?

- Add story arc to notes

Independent:

- Use Read, Write, Think to create story arc of one EB story

Story arc on Read, Write, Think Graphic Organizer

Overview

This set of plans shows the lessons for the 2nd and 3rd weeks of my 2013-2014, sixth grade reading class.  Throughout the year we will focus on the three  major text types (narrative, informative, and persuasive), analyze the structures of each while reading, then use those structures as a schematic to write in a variety of genres.  The opening unit, represented by the first week of plans on this document, will introduce these text structures and the idea that good readers approach them in specific ways.  In this mini-unit, students will focus on identifying the differences between the three text types.  We will not delve too deeply into the specifics of each text, that will come with more focused units during the year.  The opening unit is designed to frame the course and the things that we’ll study.

After the opening unit, we’ll move onto a 3-4 week unit covering narrative texts.   In this unit, students will investigate specific structures of the narrative format.  Using the Encyclopedia Brown book series as an anchor, we’ll explore how characters, setting, the problem/plot, attempts to solve the problem, and the conclusion are important elements of narrative structure.  I chose Encyclopedia Brown for this opening unit because the stories involve a regular set of characters, follow a consistent format, and appeal to boys (Jesuit Academy is all boys).  Additionally, each of the mysteries in an EB book are only 5-10 pages long.  Since many of the readers in my 6th grade class come in below grade level, these stories are accessible and not too intimidating.

Studying the EB books also provides an excellent entry point for writing.  Using what they’ve learned about narrative structures, students will write their own Encyclopedia Brown mystery by creating their own characters (to include with the regular EB characters), adapting the setting, and coming up with a problem/mystery to solve.   This will be a long term project over the course of the unit.  As we learn more about characters and character traits, students will begin to develop their own.  Similarly, as students start to identify how Donald J. Sobol (EB author) and others describe the setting in a story, the students will start to create their own settings.  Over the course of the 3-4 week unit, students will assemble the parts of their narrative into a full story.  My hope is to publish these stories, once they’ve been fully edited, into a small book of Encyclopedia Brown mysteries.

I feel pretty comfortable with the methods and assessments within this lesson plan.  The past two summers, I’ve utilized similar units with different readings and had solid outcomes, though we never got to finish a full scale project.  This is the first time in a number of years I’ll be teaching  a full year reading course.  Having more time to integrate the lessons on text structures will be great.  My plan is to do a rotation of 2-4 week units on each of the text structures - each with a writing or research project as the performance assessment. After we finish the the narrative texts unit with Encyclopedia Brown, we’ll move onto informative and then persuasive texts.  Once we’ve completed a unit on each of the text types, we’ll start the rotation over again with a new theme for the the unit.  In the second unit with narrative structures, I’ll probably utilize many of the stories in our new reading series.

There are a number of tech tools incorporated into this unit.  I teach in a 1:1 classroom, which makes it easy to bring in a variety of tools that students can use to enhance a lesson.  Though each student has their own device to use, we don’t often do whole class computer activities.  I prefer to use technology to shrink the classroom by breaking into smaller groups for more focused instruction.  The computers (used as a station) do not replace the teacher, but give students engaging tools to practice what they’ve learned or apply those skills to create a “knowledge product”.  I generally design lessons so students are at a computer station for 10 minutes or less.  This keeps them focused on the material and less likely to get off task.  While one group works on the computers, another group completes a desk-work project, and the other groups gets focused instruction with me.  This setup keeps the students moving, engaged, and allows me to get a much clearer picture of how individual students are progressing.

        All the web-based materials for the first mini unit on this document can be found on my website (http://www.mrmansour.com/reading-resources.html).  It’s unlikely that I would have a sub follow these lesson plans as written.  Depending on the sub, some handle the technology better than others.  The rotation stations are also a little tough for the uninitiated.  Nevertheless, they are easily adaptable and parallel some lessons in the textbook.  If I to have a sub, I usually post things on my classroom blog so it’s very clear for the students and easier for the sub to follow (i.e. - Click here).