Hebrew School Handbook

Contents

Educational Philosophy
Telephone Directory
Section One:  PreK - Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Registration and Placement
Billing and Fees
Forms Due by August 7th
Schedule
Attendance
Arrival
Dismissal on Sundays
Late Pick Up
Snow Days Policy
Medical Release and Allergy Action Plan
Gan
Alef-Bet
Gimel
Dalet and Hay History
Dalet and Hay Hebrew
Dalet Enrichment
Vav - Ethical Behavior
Vav - Torah and Tefillah
Vav Parent Meeting
Bar/Bat Mitzvah Class
Vav and Bar Mitzvah Tutoring
Bar/Bat Mitzvah Project
Resource Room
Tzedakah Curriculum
Young Judaea Wednesday Peulah
Tot Shabbat
Junior Congregation
Service Requirements
Dress Code
Section Two:  Hebrew High 8-12
Hebrew High Schedule
Hebrew High Billing and Fees
Hebrew High 10/11
Hebrew High 12
Additional Hebrew High Class Session
Young Judaea 7-12
Tutoring Program
Yad Squad
Year in Israel
Nikole Kalafer Memorial Fund
Sisterhood College Scholarship
Camps

Educational Philosophy

Stack Of Books Clip ArtThe FJCC stands committed to providing the best education possible for its children.  A considerable share of its resources is directed to the Hebrew school and the Rabbi is personally involved on all grade levels.  The adult congregation supports wholeheartedly the participation of its youngsters in services and all facets of synagogue life.

The FJCC is affiliated with the Conservative Movement, and shares the movement’s educational philosophy.  Emphasis is placed on both the ethical and ritual components of Judaism.  The Hebrew School sees as its task not only the making of better, more generous, and compassionate people, but also those who can actively participate in all areas of Jewish life.  Students are expected to learn to read the Hebrew of the prayer book and Bible fluently, and are encouraged to conduct all or part of our adult religious services at an early age.  They are taught the meanings of the major holidays and the proper performance of the rituals associated with them.  They gain a good working knowledge of the first five books of Moses and of the key events in Jewish history.  If students continue beyond the Bar/Bat Mitzvah, they become acquainted with the classic Rabbinic texts and the way in which Judaism looks at different social and political issues.  Additionally, they are taught the importance of tzedakah, or charity, the proper support of both the Jewish community and the community-at-large, financially and otherwise.

Because students spend only one of two sessions a week in Hebrew School, it is impossible even to begin to teach them what they need to know about Judaism.  But from age three to eighteen, the FJCC tries to provide them with a solid foundation on which they can build throughout their lives.  The following statements best describe the principles by which the school is guided and the objectives it hopes to achieve:

  1. The FJCC Hebrew School tries to instill in its students a strong sense of Jewish identity, a pride in and love for our tradition
  2. It holds that Hebrew School can, in fact, be an enjoyable experience and the material to be learned can be presented in an exciting and interesting way
  3. The interaction of the students among themselves, the friends they make, the social aspects of Hebrew School are considered an integral part of the educational experience and are encouraged and valued
  4. Both the ritual and ethical components of Judaism are important and should be taught not only in the classroom, but also experienced first hand
  5. Every student, regardless of his/her background, intellectual ability, or level of family observance, should be afforded the opportunity to acquire the requisite knowledge and skills to participate fully in the synagogue and the life of the Jewish community

A verse from the Book of Proverbs best sums up our purpose:  Train a child in the way he/she should go, and even when he/she is old, he/she will not depart from it.”

Section One:  PreK - Bar/Bat Mitzvah

Registration and Placement

Stylish Pen Clip ArtThe four forms will be mailed home the beginning of July.  Parents are asked to complete and return these forms to the synagogue office no later than August 7th.  These forms can also be found on the website, www.flemingtonjcc.org.  No students will be permitted to attend Hebrew School without a completed form after the first week of September.

For both academic and social reasons, the staff feels strongly that the students in each class should be of a similar age and grade level.  While exceptions will be made when circumstances require.

Billing and Fees

Registration and Program (RP) Fee are billed each June.  Payment is due by July 15th for your child to be considered for Hebrew School and for your child/children to receive books and materials.http://www.clickartonline.com/dodl.php?linklokauth=L3RlbXAvYzMzMDE0OV9hLmpwZywxNDAxMDQ1NTk2LDcxLjQ4LjEwOS4yMTUsMCwwLExMXzAsLDgyOGM1OGY4ZjU0NTAwOThjMDhiNDc4YmE2NmMzMTRm/c330149_a.jpg

Tuition appears on your July statement.  Monthly payments are acceptable.  In the event of financial hardship, you must contact Jonathan Weitz, Treasurer, treasurer@flemingtonjcc.org.

Students in Gan – HH12 who withdraw from Hebrew School in writing by October 18th will receive a refund for tuition only.  RP fees are non-refundable.  There will be no refunds after the dates listed above.

Grade

Tuition

Registration Program Fee

 

 

 

Gan

410.00

80.00

Alef-Bet

410.00

125.00

Gimel

630.00

180.00

Dalet

630.00

180.00

Hay

630.00

180.00

Vav

630.00

180.00

Bar/Bat Mitzvah

600.00

80.00

Forms Due by August 7th

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The following forms must be on file for your child to attend Hebrew School:

1. Contact Form (on cardstock)

2. Media Consent Form

3. Medical Release Form

4. Allergy Action Plan Form (for those with allergies)

Schedule

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Gan

9:00 - 11:30

9:00 - 11:30

Gimel

9:00 - 11:30

4:20 - 6:15

Dalet

9:00 - 11:30

4:20 - 6:15

Hay

9:00 - 11:30

4:20 - 6:15

Vav

9:00 - 11:30

4:20 - 6:15

Bar/Bat Mitzvah

4:30 - 5:45*

*Bar/Bat Mitzvah class will meet the first three available Mondays of the month through March

Attendance

No child can be expected to succeed in Hebrew School unless he or she attends consistently.  While the Hebrew School has no specific attendance requirements, and attendance is taken primarily for safety reasons, the faculty urges parents to make sure their children miss as few classes as possible.  In the event of an absence of more than a week, the child’s teacher should be contacted and the missed work made-up.

If your child is going to be absent, please notify Kimi Mittler, kimi@flemingtonjcc.org.  She will notify the teachers.  

Arrival

Kids In Cupboard Clip Art Hebrew School starts promptly at 4:30 on Wednesdays.  Children may be dropped off at 4:10, and will be allowed to wait in the lobby until 4:20, when they will be escorted to their classrooms.

Hebrew School Sunday session starts promptly at 9:00 AM.  Students may be dropped off at 8:50.  Late arrival is discouraged, as the students will miss out on the introduction to the day's lesson.

Dismissal on Sundays

Clipboard Clip Art All students Gan - Vav must be signed out from the sanctuary on Sundays.  Younger siblings will not be released to older children, who must be signed out on Sundays as well.

Parents should park on the far lot, allowing parents and children to cross the driving lane.

Late Pick Up

Pocket Watch Icon Clip Art Students are dismissed at 11:30 on Sundays and 6:15 on Wednesdays.  Dismissal takes no more than ten minutes.  Anyone arriving at 12:00 or 6:30 respectively should notify Kimi Mittler, 908-782-6410 ext. 11.  Please do not leave a message on Mrs. Walsh's voice mail as she will be supervising in the parking lot.

Late pick up the first time, parent will receive a time stamped email.  The second time, again parent will receive a time stamped email.  On the third and following late pickup, the following fees will post to your FJCC account.

You will be notified via email on each occasion.  All late fees will appear on your monthly statement and must be paid in full prior to registering for Hebrew School and/or having a Bar or Bat Mitzvah.  

Snow Days Policy

Snow Plow Clip ArtThe Hebrew School policy for snow days is as follows: Hebrew School is closed when Flemington-Raritan schools are closed, even if the weather improves during the course of the day.  If Flemington-Raritan closes for early dismissal, or if after school activities are canceled, there will be no Hebrew School.  Parents will be notified by phone and/or email.  If Flemington-Raritan has a delayed opening, there will be Hebrew School.

Medical Release and Allergy Action Plan

Doctor 3 Clip ArtAll students are required to have a medical form on file prior to the first day of school.  Medical Forms can be found in the Back To School Packet or can be picked up at the office.

Food Allergy Policy

Students with food allergies must provide the following:

  1. Allergy Emergency Action Plan
  2. Epipen and any additional medications listed on Allergy Emergency Action Plan

Each student will have clear plastic baggies containing:

  1. Student’s medication
  2. Doctor provided Allergy Emergency Action Plan form

The plastic baggie will have the child's name clearly marked on it.

The baggie will be placed in the cabinet behind the Hebrew School Support Staff's desk in the outer office.

The cabinet will be clearly marked on the outside.

Alternative snacks will be provided for students with food allergies.

Allergies will be posted on the class door.

Gan

The Gan class is a two-year program designed for Pre-K and Kindergarten age students.  This is an opportunity for the younger set to explore Jewish holidays and symbols and study the alef-bet, the Hebrew alphabet.  A variety of crafts and games will enhance the weekly lessons.  B’rachot for Shabbat and the holidays will be taught.  Bible stories will be used to demonstrate Jewish values as well as introduce the children to major characters in the Torah.https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTEph-XuZs-G_VPVrPdElRW2sw6yJeYNMxPk3P3oMydwJC0i89J

The Gan curriculum includes a unit devoted to learning about the synagogue.  The students will learn about different ritual objects found in the synagogue.  David, the Shabbat guest, is a regular in the Gan classroom and will be visiting a different family each week.  

Alef-Bet

01. ALEF - turquoise dropcap* The Alef and Bet students will be combined in one classroom.  There is a wealth of materials available for early childhood education.  An “A” “B” year curriculum will be used to teach about Mitzvot and Holidays.

The students will be divided into small groups for Hebrew, working with both the teacher and the assistants.

The unit about Jerusalem will be incorporated into the curriculum and divided over the two years.  The unit will explore people and places in Jerusalem.

The students will continue to do their Torah study during Shabbat with the Gan class.

*image copyright Bitsela, used courtesy of free-bitsela.com

Gimel

04hc-Gimel* This is the first year the students come twice during the week.  This allows for a more detailed exploration of the concepts taught in Sunday School.

Gimel students will learn the skills needed to read from the Siddur.  Children will become familiar with Shabbat and Yom Tov B’rachot (prayers).  Bible will focus on the lessons taught in the book of Bereshit.  The year will end with the Gimel Class Service on April 15th, 2016.  The children will lead the Friday night services and receive the new Shabbat prayer book.  A Hebrew School Shabbat dinner will take place before services.

*image copyright Bitsela, used courtesy of free-bitsela.com

Dalet & Hay History

Dalet students embark on the first of a three-year journey through Jewish history.  The Dalet students will examine Jewish life from Patriarchal times (1800 B.C.E.) through the destruction of the second temple (70 C.E.).  Students will gain an understanding of Jewish life through the eyes of the prophets and judges as well as the teachings of the Rabbis who struggled to preserve Judaism.  A special unit of study will be devoted to learning about Israel.

The second year of Jewish history continues as the Hay students examine Jewish history from the Middle Ages to modern times.  The year is divided into three parts.  Part one will focus on the Middle Ages and the Golden Age of Spain; part two explores “Coming to America” from colonial days to the early 1900’s; and part three examines anti-Semitism and the Holocaust.

This history program is unique in its approach for it teaches history with little emphasis on names, dates, or facts.  It concentrates on what being Jewish means in a non-Jewish world and how each individual student learns from his past and identifies with the present.

Dalet & Hay Hebrew

The Dalet class will meet twice a week to refine its Hebrew reading skills, further its understanding of the Jewish calendar and holidays, and learn the rituals associated with them.  The class will use both Hebrew textbooks and prayer books.  A basic prayer vocabulary will be studied.

The Hay class will focus on learning to read Hebrew fluently, becoming acquainted with the weekly Torah portions and exploring further the holidays and rituals associated with them.  For Hebrew reading the Saturday morning siddur will be the primary text; Sedra Scenes will be used to introduce the students to the weekly Torah portions and for the holidays whatever text or ritual object is appropriate.

Dalet EnrichmentDalet jpeg.jpg

Mrs. Rapkin will meet with the Dalet Students the first hour each Wednesday.  During this time, she will offer lessons to complement both the Hebrew and History curricula with two major units of study.  First, the Torah component: the students will engage in an in-depth study of Creation using the beautifully illustrated In The Beginning.

This year we are introducing a new book, A Child's Bible Book 2, Lessons from the Prophets and Writings.  The students will explore Jewish leaders including Samson, Ruth, Esther, and King Solomon.  This unit will emphasize the Torah lesson and dovetail with the historic lessons taught in Mrs. Gross's class.

The student will spend time each week reviewing the Hebrew lesson taught by Mr. Katz.

Vav – Ethical Behavior

The Judaic component of the Vav curriculum is divided into three units of study: Jewish Environmentalism, Jewish Values Demonstrated by Jewish Role Models, and A Historical Overview of the Holocaust.  This year the Judaic component of the Vav curriculum with use a more integrated approach for combining the Jewish Values and Environmental Judaism.  The year will end with a detailed unit on the Holocaust.

During the course of the year, students will have an opportunity to work in small groups for some projects and independently on others.

Vav - Torah and Tefillah

The Rabbi’s section of the Vav class will focus on Hebrew reading from the Siddur (prayer book) and Chumash (Pentateuch).  Students will learn the special b’rachot and rituals associated with each of the holidays.  They will be required to know by heart all of the holidays, the Hebrew alphabet and months of the Hebrew calendar.  The same texts will be used, and students will be required to complete take-home exams of each Biblical book they complete.  The focus will be primarily on the Book of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and, time permitting, Deuteronomy.

Vav - Parent Meeting

There will be a meeting during Hebrew School for the Vav Class parents in October.  The Rabbi and Karen Walsh will discuss synagogue etiquette, service attendance, and Bar/Bat Mitzvah.  Sisterhood and Executive Board will provide information ranging from hiring kitchen help to Bar/Bat Mitzvah fees.

A second meeting will take place during the year with the rabbi and parents of upcoming B'nai Mitzvah students in the sanctuary to go over all components of the Saturday morning service and insure that parents are comfortable with, and fully understand what will take place on the day of their child(ren)’s Bar/ Bat Mitzvah.

In the spring, Karen Walsh will meet with the parents to discuss the Bar/Bat Mitzvah project requirements.  This meeting will be dedicated to information concerning the Bar/Bat Mitzvah project requirements.  Parents and students will then be asked to meet individually with Karen Walsh sometime in June or July to go over the particulars of each project, from selection to implementation.

Bar/Bat Mitzvah Class

Students in the 7th grade will be required to attend a weekly Bar/Bat Mitzvah class.  V’Zot HaTorah will be their primary text, as well as Sedra Scenes from the Book of Judges.  Classroom discussion will center around the weekly Torah portion and the “mitzvah of the week” as designated and elaborated upon by the authors of V’zot HaTorah.  In addition, students will view three videos, each focusing on the meaning of Bar/Bat Mitzvah, from the perspective of a young person preparing for the ceremony.  Students will be asked to reflect upon, and write about, what Bar/Bat Mitzvah means to them.

Several times during the year students and parents will meet together during the class to discuss issues of concern about Bar/Bat Mitzvah and its significance.

Vav and Bar Mitzvah Tutoring

Those students in Vav and Bar/Bat Mitzvah classes are required to tutor twice a week with the Rabbi and/or an older student in preparation for their B’nai/B’not Mitzvah.  The Rabbi will contact the parents of each student to discuss his/her tutoring schedule.  Generally speaking, sessions with the student tutor can be arranged at a time and location convenient to both the tutor and the student.  The Rabbi will assign his tutoring times based on the date of the students’ B’nai/B’not Mitzvah.  Those earliest in the year will be given first choice.  The Rabbi is available to tutor by phone or in person, or a combination of both.  Each session is a half-hour in length.

Bar Bat Mitzvah Project

Each student in the Bar/Bat Mitzvah class is expected to participate in a special project as part of their Bar/Bat Mitzvah preparation.  This project should be something substantial that requires at least several months of work and that reflects a particular interest or talent of the student.  It should involve “acts of kindness”: if a student likes animals, for example, he or she may want to raise money for an animal shelter.  Students may “adopt” an older person in a nursing home or in the community, or volunteer their time at a social service agency.  In short, the project should be a hands-on, serious effort that allows the student to put his/her own unique stamp on the celebration.  Projects must be done in consultation with Karen Walsh.  Project packets are distributed at the mid March parent meeting.  Students and parents should meet with Karen Walsh once during the summer and submit to discuss options for their Bar/Bat Mitzvah project.  A formal project plan should be submitted by November.  Karen Walsh will not meet in September or October to discuss these projects.  The work will be put on display (if possible) on the day of the Bar/Bat Mitzvah or may serve as the topic of the celebrant’s devar Torah (Bar/Bat Mitzvah speech).http://www.clickartonline.com/dodl.php?linklokauth=L3RlbXAvYzMwNzgzNF9zLmpwZywxNDAzODg0NTc2LDcxLjQ4LjEwOC4xNzYsMCwwLExMXzAsLDZkYjM2MDQxNDlmNDk5NGJkZThiOTBiYWJmZDhjNTIy/c307834_s.jpg

Resource Room

The resource room affords students the opportunity to receive support in Hebrew reading as well as providing an outlet for students who require a break from the regular classroom setting.  Students have the opportunity to progress at their own pace while utilizing a multitude of instructional materials and strategies.  Support is generally provided on an individual basis but can also include small group instruction.  In addition to providing direct instruction, the teacher assistants have also provided support within the classroom setting.  The students benefit from a team approach that includes communication between the special education coordinator, the classroom teachers, and the teacher assistants.  They develop a rapport with the teacher assistants while working on skills that are introduced in the classroom and reviewed, reinforced, and remediated in the resource room.

Tzedakah Curriculum

TZEDAKAH BOX*Feed the hungry, clothe the naked, shelter the homeless..." Isaiah 58:7

This is the schoolwide theme that will be woven into the fabric of the overall curriculum Pre-K through Hebrew High 12, and will be examined in relationship to the Jewish calendar, Jewish holidays, and ethical tenets of tzedakah, kindness, truth, and justice.

In the fall the students will raise money to purchase winter coats and boots to be donated to United Way supporting children in need in Hunterdon County.  In January the students will collect 1,000 canned goods to be donated to the Flemington Food Pantry.  The year will end with the students raising money for Family Promise.

December 20th, families can volunteer for the day at the Jewish Relief Agency packing food for the needy, and delivering the boxes to residents in the greater Philadelphia area

*image copyright Bitsela, used courtesy of free-bitsela.com 

Young Judaea Wednesday Peulah

Our popular weeknight peulah series is back.  These are twice-a- month activities that each focus on one of our core pillars.  They run from after Hebrew School to 7:15, and dinner, complete with fruits, vegetables, and dessert, is always served.  Topics range from Israeli culture, to Jewish identity, to the Torah.  All weeknight peulot are free, and RSVPS are not necessary.  Ideas for upcoming peulot are encouraged, and can be sent to flemingtonyj@gmail.comC:\Users\Sharon\Desktop\israeli flag.gif

*image copyright Bitsela, used courtesy of free-bitsela.com 

Tot Shabbat

We are making some changes to Tot Shabbat this year.  Students enrolled in Gan-Bet Hebrew School will first meet with Mrs. Clarin and Mrs. Kesselhaut in the classroom from 5:30 - 6:30 PM.  This hour is a drop off session.  This time will be devoted to key components of the curriculum which would otherwise be taught on Sundays.  The class time will focus on selections from Berhman House’s “Let's Discover G-d" series. tot.jpg

 At 6:30 parents will join the students in the sanctuary for a short service lead by the Rabbi.  This is a wonderful way to experience the beauty of Shabbat at an earlier hour, starting at 6:30 and ending at 7:30.  The rabbi tells a story, and the children are encouraged to come up onto the bimah.  The atmosphere is relaxed, and children can be, well, children.  The service is followed by a mini Oneg.  Tot Shabbat will be offered five times during the year (refer to monthly calendar).  Emails will be sent home several weeks prior to each Tot Shabbat.

Junior Congregation

Junior Congregation will meet four Saturdays, December through March, 3rd through 6th grade.  Students in 3rd through 7th grade will meet with their teachers in the classroom at 9:30 for one hour.  Afterwards, 3rd through 6th grade will assemble in the multipurpose room for a service conducted by Hebrew High School volunteers.   jr. cong.jpg

At approximately 11:00, the Rabbi will conduct the Torah service with the students.  The Sefer Torah, the Torah Scroll, will be taken out, and all students will be given the opportunity to have an aliyah, to be called up to the Torah, and recite the appropriate berachot, individually or in a group.

Service Requirements

http://ehebrew.net/download/torah/Tora.pngThe Hebrew School is continuing the incentive program to encourage students in Gan through Vav to attend Friday evening and Saturday morning services.

Students who fulfill any of the requirements listed below will be recognized at Shabbat services at the end of the year.  

Chodesh Award – students who attend once a month or nine times during the Hebrew School year

Chai Award – students who attend twice a month or eighteen times during the school year

Chai v’Chaytzi Award – students who attend three times a month or 27 times during the school year

Double Chai Award – students who attend four times a month or 36 times during the school year

At the end of the year, students will receive a Certificate of Recognition and a Bookmark.

Dress Code

All students and staff of the FJCC Hebrew School must adhere to the following dress code:

Boys must have their heads covered.  No cut off or short shorts, sweatpants, or athletic pants.

Girls must have their shoulders and midriffs covered.  A tallit cannot be used as a covering.  Hemlines must be no shorter than mid-thigh.

Students who come to Hebrew School inappropriately dressed will be sent home and will not be allowed on the bimah at services.

 

Section Two:  Hebrew High 8 – 12

Hebrew High Schedule

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

HH8/9

5: 45-7:00

HH10/11

6:30-7:45

HH12

7:00-8:00

Hebrew High Billing and Fees

Registration and Program (RP) Fee are billed each May.  Payment is due by July 17th for your child to be considered for Hebrew School and for your child/children to receive books and materials.http://www.clickartonline.com/dodl.php?linklokauth=L3RlbXAvYzMzMDE0OV9hLmpwZywxNDAxMDQ1NTk2LDcxLjQ4LjEwOS4yMTUsMCwwLExMXzAsLDgyOGM1OGY4ZjU0NTAwOThjMDhiNDc4YmE2NmMzMTRm/c330149_a.jpg

Tuition appears on your July statement.  Monthly payments are acceptable.  In the event of financial hardship, you must contact Jonathan Weitz, Treasurer, treasurer@flemingtonjcc.org.

Students in Gan – HH12 who withdraw from Hebrew School in writing by October 18th, 2015, will receive a refund for tuition only.  RP fees are non-refundable.  There will be no refunds after the dates listed.

Grade HH8 - HH12

Tuition

Registration Program Fee

 

 

 

HH8 – HH12

390.00

80.00


Hebrew High 8/9

Students will view a number of different DVDs during the course of the year on subjects ranging from anti-Semitism to cults.  Students will be asked to respond to these DVDs and the issues they raise.  The students will also be introduced to Rashi script and rabbinic commentary, and they are welcome to suggest for discussion issues of interest to them.

 

Hebrew High 10/11

Issues such as the Holocaust, afterlife, prayer, human sexuality, tikkun olam, etc., will be discussed as well as important contemporary issues.  Students will review Rashi script and view several topical DVDs.  

Hebrew High 12

Students will meet through December, and will focus primarily on the text “Jewish Literacy” by Joseph Telushkin and review topics contained of interest therein.

Additional Hebrew High Class Session

Programs such as the Interfaith Thanksigivng Service, Yom HaShoah Program, Simchat Torah Service, and Purim Service all count towards attendance.  You will be notified by email when these services are held.  

Young Judaea 7 - 12

Flemington Young Judaea is our own local branch of Young Judaea, the oldest Zionist youth movement in the country.  We focus on the five central pillars of Young Judaea: Zionism, social action, peer leadership, pluralism, and Jewish identity.  Using these pillars as a base, we run events for ofarim-tzofim (grades 3-6) and bogrim (grades 7-12).  Some of the popular events include movie nights, the Purim Carnival, and participation in the Celebrate Israel Parade in New York City.  The group is led by an elected Mazkirut, or board, of dedicated teenagers with the help of our advisor, Allison Rovensky.  If you want to get involved, or if you have any questions, email flemingtonyj@gmail.com.  Also, like us on Facebook as Flemington Young Judaea, and follow our blog at flemingtonyj.wordpress.com to get the latest news about what is happening.

Tutoring and Teacher Assistants

Post Bar/Bat Mitzvah students can remain active in the synagogue, maintain their synagogue skills, serve as role models to their younger counterparts and earn a substantial sum of money by participating in either one or both tutoring programs described below:

Program        1: Prepare Bar/Bat Mitzvah students for their B’nai/B’not Mitzvah Program

Program        2: Assist teacher in Hebrew School classroom.

Salary:        $17.00 for midweek sessions, 4:15 – 6:15 and $25.00 for Sunday sessions, 9:00 – 11:45

All tutors and teacher aides will be required to:

  1. Assist during the High Holydays for either Junior Congregation or the children’s workshops.
  2. Attend 80% of all Hebrew High School classes.
  3. Attend at least one Friday night or Saturday morning service a month.
  4. Facilitate two Torah time Babysitting sessions.
  5. Have completed a Bar/Bat Mitzvah project
  6. Be 14 or older and have a W-4 and working papers on file.
  7. Adhere to the synagogue’s dress code (see page 17).

Yad Squad

Students are encouraged throughout the year to lead services and chant Torah and Haftara.  Dates and specific aliyot must be arranged through the rabbi.  All students prepare the material on their own.  Students reading Torah can earn $30 an aliyah to be used toward an organized trip to Israel (see “Nikole Kalafer Memorial Fund”).  All students will receive recognition in the monthly bulletin.http://www.clickartonline.com/dodl.php?linklokauth=L3RlbXAvYzE2Mzc2OF9zLmpwZywxNDAzNzYzODQwLDcxLjQ4LjEwOC4xNzYsMCwwLExMXzAsLDVhMDM0ZDU2ZGRlZGUwZDQ1Y2VlMzBjZDY1NGQ3OTRj/c163768_s.jpg

 

Year in Israel

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Students interested in participating in a “Year-in-Israel” program prior to entering college should see the Rabbi about scholarship options.

 

Nikole Kalafer Memorial Fund

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An endowment fund has been established in memory of Nikole Kalafer to provide scholarships for FJCC students, ages 15 through 22, who wish to participate in an organized, educational program in Israel.  To qualify, students must fulfill the following requirements for a minimum of three years after their B’Nai/B’Not Mitzvah: 1) attend at least one Friday night and/or Saturday morning service a month (September-June); 2) attend a minimum of 80% of all Hebrew High School classes; 3) complete their Bar/Bat Mitzvah projects as approved by Karen Walsh within a year of their B’nai/B’not Mitzvah.  Upon return from Israel, the recipients must send a note of thanks to the Kalafers and must make a presentation about their trip to the congregation at a Friday night service.  Finally, the families of the recipients must be members in good standing.  While the synagogue is willing to consider a wide range of different organized programs, all must be approved by the Rabbi and Endowment Committee before a scholarship will be awarded.  The amount of the scholarship may vary, but at present it stands at $1,000.  All scholarships must be used within six months, or the money returned to the FJCC.  

*image copyright Bitsela, used courtesy of free-bitsela.com 

Sisterhood College Scholarship

C:\Users\Sharon\Desktop\books.pngThe FJCC Sisterhood has established a Scholarship Fund for college bound students.  To qualify for the scholarship, students must have completed a Bar/Bat Mitzvah project, and fulfill the following requirements through their junior year in high school:: 1) attend a minimum of ten Shabbat or holiday services, (excluding High Holydays) or special programs annually; 2) volunteer to serve on the High Holydays in whatever capacity the school deems appropriate; 3) tutor and/or work as a teacher’s aide if possible and; 4) attend a minimum of 16 classes a year.

After successful completion of the above requirements, students in HH12 must 1) attend a minimum of 12 classes a year or arrange to make up any missed classroom hours through community service or similar work as approved by the Rabbi and Karen Walsh; 2) attend a minimum of ten Shabbat services (excluding High Holydays) during the school year; and 3) write a 1000 word essay on a topic of the Rabbi’s choosing to be published in the July/August bulletin.  Families of recipients must be members in good standing.  

Camps

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The Scholarship Fund is also used to provide interest free loans to those students desiring to attend an approved Jewish sleep away camp for the summer (one where Sabbath and kashrut are observed and Services are conducted on a regular basis) or to supplement the Israel scholarship.  The maximum loan is currently $1500 and must be paid back within 18 months.  Students may do so in several ways: 1) from money earned from their tutoring; 2) money from family or work outside the synagogue; 3) by reading Torah on Shabbat and/or holidays.  The Rabbi will deduct $30 from the amount owed for each aliyah that is chanted.  Students are expected to learn all aliyot on their own and may rehearse them with the Rabbi prior to the Shabbat or holiday on which they are reading.  Students who wish to earn more than the $1000 scholarship toward their trips to Israel may do so by reading Torah and will be paid at the same rate.