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HS TFU Planner Template

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AIS-R’s Global Citizenship definition:  An AIS-R global citizen possesses the understandings, skills, values, and mindset to take meaningful action in creating a more inclusive, sustainable, and peaceful world.

Teacher(s): Pamela Rampley, Alejandro Franco, Cullen Hodgkiss

Subject: Integrated Science 

Grade: 9

Unit: Systems and System Models

Unit Description:

Students will investigate the various systems and system models present in the different scientific disciplines. In life science, students will investigate the interacting systems within multicellular organisms and the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the carbon cycle. In physical science, students will investigate how a change in energy in one component of a system may affect other components. And in earth and space science, students will investigate the relationships among Earth systems and how they’re being modified due to human activity.

Resources:

NGSS

Paul Anderson’s website

Paul Anderson’s web resources

Paul Anderson’s Bits and Bobs (via Tracy)

Energy Change Lab

The Habitable Planet 

Standards and Benchmarks:

NGSS Standards targeted in this unit:

HS-LS1-2 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.

[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on functions at the organism system level such as nutrient uptake, water delivery, and organism movement in response to neural stimuli. An example of an interacting system could be an artery depending on the proper function of elastic tissue and smooth muscle to regulate and deliver the proper amount of blood within the circulatory system.]

[Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include interactions and functions at the molecular or chemical reaction level.]

HS-LS2-5 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.

[Clarification Statement: Examples of models could include simulations and mathematical models.]

[Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include the specific chemical steps of photosynthesis and respiration.]

HS-PS3-1 Energy

Create a computational model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.

[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on explaining the meaning of mathematical expressions used in the model.]

[Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to basic algebraic expressions or computations; to systems of two or three components; and to thermal energy, kinetic energy, and/or the energies in gravitational, magnetic, or electric fields.]

HS-ESS2-6 Earth's Systems

Develop a quantitative model to describe the cycling of carbon among the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.

[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on modeling biogeochemical cycles that include the cycling of carbon through the ocean, atmosphere, soil, and biosphere (including humans), providing the foundation for living organisms.]

HS-ESS3-6 Earth and Human Activity

Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity.

[Clarification Statement: Examples of Earth systems to be considered are the hydrosphere, atmosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and/or biosphere. An example of the far-reaching impacts from a human activity is how an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide results in an increase in photosynthetic biomass on land and an increase in ocean acidification, with resulting impacts on sea organism health and marine populations.]

[Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include running computational representations but is limited to using the published results of scientific computational models.]

AIS-R Science Program: Essential Understandings: K-12*

Asking Questions (Science) and (Defining Problems - Engineering)

Curiosity is the foundation for asking questions and seeking answers, allowing us to solve problems through investigation.

Using Models

Using models gives us ways to represent an idea, object, process or system and help describe and explain phenomena that cannot be experienced directly.

Conducting Investigations

Conducting Investigations helps guide exploration, generate new questions and provide evidence for observations about the world around us.

Analysing Data

Analysing data helps us note patterns and understand relationships between independent and dependent variables, helping us to arrive at a valid conclusion to the investigation.

Using Mathematics

Using mathematics helps us understand concepts through comparisons, measurements, calculations and communications of data.

Constructing Explanations (Science)  and (Designing Solutions - Engineering)

Constructing Explanations helps us to develop our own explanations of phenomena, whether based on observations we have made or models we have developed. In engineering, the goal is a design rather than an explanation. The process of developing a design is iterative and systematic, as is the process of developing an explanation or a theory in science.

Arguing From Evidence

Arguing based on available evidence, and not just authority, logic and intuition, engages us in the scientific process and provides a better idea of how science actually works.

Communicating Information

Communicating information, evidence, and ideas can be done in multiple ways, allowing students to share their discoveries, distribute information, and demonstrate understanding about their ideas by using tables, diagrams, graphs, models, interactive displays, and equations as well as orally, in writing, and through extended discussions. 

*Inspired by NGSS Practices

ISTE Standards for Students - Tech

1. Creativity and innovation

Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.

a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes 

b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression 

c. Use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues 

d. Identify trends and forecast possibilities

 2. Communication and collaboration 

Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media

b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats

c. Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures

d. Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems

3. Research and information fluency 

Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

a. Plan strategies to guide inquiry 

b. Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media 

c. Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks 

d. Process data and report results

4. Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making 

Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

a. Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation

b. Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project 

c. Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions 

d. Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions

5. Digital citizenship 

Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology

b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity 

c. Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning

d. Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship

6. Technology operations and concepts 

Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.

a. Understand and use technology systems 

b. Select and use applications effectively and productively 

c. Troubleshoot systems and applications

d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Overarching Understanding Goals:

Unit-level Understanding Goals:

Defining the system under study—specifying its boundaries and making explicit a model of that system—provides tools for understanding and testing ideas that are applicable throughout science and engineering.

*Inspired by NGSS Practices

  1. SWBAT develop and use a model that illustrates the organization of the systems interacting within a living organism.
  2. SWBAT develop a model to illustrate how photosynthesis and cellular respiration play a role in the carbon cycle.
  3. SWBAT create a computational model to calculate change in energy in a system.
  4. SWBAT use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth’s systems and how they are being modified by human activity.

*Inspired by NGSS Practices

Essential Questions:

How are different systems connected?

Can the parts observed be organized into a larger system?

How does a system change when there are changes in its parts?

How do models (including cycles) help explain repeating patterns and changing properties?

How are models similar to or different from the natural world?

AIS-R Learning Principles:

Highlight the relevant learning principles targeted in this unit.

How do we address this principle in the unit?

We, at AIS-R, promote collaboration with fellow students and mentors because we know that students learn best when they work together, share information, ideas and experiences.

promote collaboration

We, at AIS-R, provide a sincere teacher-student relationship where children’s cultures and beliefs are valued and where they feel supported, challenged, and encouraged to be risk-takers because we know that students learn best in that environment.

encourage risk taking 

We, at AIS-R, provide our students with learning connected to real-life explorations because we know that students learn best from authentic experiences.

authentic experiences

We, at AIS-R, provide clear instructional goals and quality exemplars because we know that students learn best when expectations are understood/clear and modeled.

expectations are understood/clear and modeled

We, at AIS-R, provide opportunities to question, analyze, apply and transfer skills and knowledge because we know that students learn best when they are actively engaged in their learning.

actively engaged in their learning

We, at AIS-R, assess readiness and teach accordingly because we know that students learn best when activities are developmentally appropriate.

developmentally appropriate

We, at AIS-R, provide a variety of learning opportunities that are fun and engaging because we know that students learn best when they are interested and motivated.

fun and engaging

We, at AIS-R, provide students with specific and worthy information about their learning because we know that students learn best when given useful feedback. 

useful feedback

We at AIS-R provide opportunities for students to dialogue with peers and adults about their learning because we know that students learn best when they self-assess and self-reflect.

self-assess and self-reflect

We, at AIS-R, differentiate our instruction to meet the individual needs of our students because we know that students learn at different rates and according to various learning styles.

differentiate our instruction to meet the individual needs

We, at AIS-R, provide students with the opportunity to connect and build on previous learning because we know students learn best by scaffolding skills, knowledge and understanding.

connect and build on previous learning 

We, at AIS-R, provide opportunities for students to make decisions and have a voice in their learning because we know that students learn best when given options.

options

Performances of Understanding:

List descriptions of each Performance of Understanding

Lessons and Activities

1. Diagnostic: Socrative quiz

Lesson:

2. Development 1: Case study: Lost in the desert!

Homework: Define: photosynthesis, cellular respiration, feeding, combustion, fossilization and decomposition.

  • Students will participate in a case study via a Socratic Seminar, where they will be developing and using a model based off of this case study.
  • Self-assessment exit ticket

3. Development 2: Carbon cycle poster

Lesson:

  • Students will begin creating a model for the carbon cycle. They will include photosynthesis, cellular respiration, feeding, combustion, fossilization and decomposition and highlight the connections between the following systems: biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
  • Self-assessment exit ticket

4. Development 3: Carbon cycle game

Lesson:

  • Students will be introduced to the Carbon Dice Game and given instructions.
  • Students will then play this game with their classmates and come to a conclusion about the importance of the carbon cycle.
  • Self-assessment exit ticket

5. Development 4: Online carbon cycle game

Homework: Research what exothermic and endothermic reactions are as well as evidences for chemical change by clicking on the Lab: Exothermic, Endothermic, & Chemical Change (except for Calculate the enthalpy of reaction (ΔH)). Read, and take notes.

Lesson:

  • Students will be briefly introduced to the online carbon cycle game.
  • Students will play this game on their laptops and distinguish between this game and the carbon cycle game that we played during the previous class.
  • Self-assessment exit ticket

4. Developmental 5: Lab: Exothermic, Endothermic, & Chemical Change

Rubric

Lesson:

  • Students will watch this video and participate in these lab activities. Students will focus on the meaning of mathematical expressions used in the model.

5. Product 1: Lab: The Energy of Evaporation

Rubric

Lesson:

  • Students will focus on the meaning of mathematical expressions used in the model.
  • Individual lab #2: The Energy of Evaporation
  • Lab report requirements are 1 data table, 2 graphs, and 2 JS paragraphs - one for the conclusion and 1 for the evaluation.
  • If time permits, students could then read and discuss this article on renewable energy.

5. Product 2: Documentary Video Project: Students will develop a 3-5 minute video using the published results of scientific representation to illustrate the relationships among the Earth’s systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity.

As a consequence of this learning outcome, students develop a better understanding of human impacts on different earth systems, raise awareness of the issues, and then, take a meaningful step in developing a more inclusive, sustainable, and peaceful world. 

Rubric (to be developed based on Assessment Criteria)

Lesson:

  • Students will choose and define at least two of the following Earth’s systems:
  • Hydrosphere, atmosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, or biosphere.
  • Then, they will be required to make a documentary which includes using the published results of scientific computational models. The emphasis should be on the published scientific data.
  • Documentary should illustrate the relationships among at least two of the Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity.
  • Students must address the following questions in their video:
  • How are their systems connected and related to the other Earth systems?
  • How are their systems changing due to human activity?  

    Reflection (during and after the unit)

What Worked Well?

What Didn’t Work Well?

Notes/Changes/Suggestions:

  • Socrative quiz
  • Case study
  • Both carbon cycle games
  • Paired lab and individual lab
  • Documentary project
  • The carbon cycle poster took up a lot of class time
  • Try to make the documentary project more organized for next year - possibly, provide students with a checklist for each class/homework

Possible ideas for next year:

Unit exemplars

Documentary exemplars