Wind Ensemble

January 27, 2020

Announcements

Your UIL music has been presented to you. It is time to take ownership for your learning- complete your benchmarks, and make sure to have an understanding of your UIL music. Your Sightreading Terms page will be due Friday, January 31st.

Objective

  1. Prepare our UIL Music for a Superior Performance
  2. Refine our sightreading skills, with an eye towards understanding key signatures

Warm Up, Content and Curriculum

Breathing exercises in for 4/2/1, out for 1/2/4/8. Breathe deeply, pulling the air below the belly button, and push through the abs. Keep the shoulders rolled back and the sternum lifted.  

Long Tones 1A, 1B, 1C, & 1D with rhythmic/articulation variations. Brass on Mouthpiece.

Lip Slurs Set 1, options 1 (all), 5 (Woodwinds), 4 (Brass). Set 3, Option 1. Woodwinds focus on clear octave/register jumps using their airspeed. Brass focuses on four (or more) clear partials without blasting upper register. Perform forward, backward, and with an 8th note subdivision.

Scales- All-Region Band Scales Page: ALL as written; adding D and Db scales.

Concert Music- Marche Diabolique, Four Shaker Songs, La Madre De Los Gatos

ELPS

Students will see their material in a visual, auditory, and kinesthetic manner. English Language Learners will engage through kinesthetic performances and numerous visual cues habitually provided through instruction. Small group instruction through sectionals both during and after school will provide students with focused, individualized attention.

Student Responsibilities

  1. Make your best sound.
  2. UIL prep- Use our BLEND exercise as Aural models for your practice
  3. Long tones, lip slurs, articulations
  4. Sightreading skills- Recognize Key signatures

SIM Content Enhancement Routines/Instructional Playbook

New music will be approached using a scaffolded frame routine. Students will all follow our Order of Performance routine and will count, letter name, position, and air band all new music encountered. Anchors of rhythmic and melodic support will be supplied in advance of new rhythmic and melodic concepts. Our FRAME’d journal pages will be used daily for note taking on new concepts.


Mondays - Band Hall open until 5:30

Warm-up- Long Tones, Lip Slurs, F Around the Room, C Minor Chorale

Curriculum- Simple Sightreading exercise, Marche 72-end; if time, Madre 72

In Class Sectionals- Clarinets with Mr. Corpus, Pass-offs and Weekly Benchmarks with

Ms. Inglish

After School Sectionals- High Voices- Flute, Clarinet, Trumpet

Tuesdays - Band Hall open until 5:30

Warm-up- Long Tones, Lip Slurs, F Around the Room, C Minor Chorale

Curriculum- Marche 40-56, 72-80; Simple Gifts 32-40; La Madre 49-57

In Class Sectionals- Flutes with Mr. Corpus, F Horns with Mr. O. Pass-offs and Weekly

Benchmarks with Ms. Inglish

After School Sectionals- Jazz Band

Wednesdays - Band Hall open until 5:30

        Warm-up- Long Tones, Lip Slurs, F Around the Room, C Minor Chorale

Curriculum- La Madre backwards, ending to 87, Marche 48-64 Simple Gifts 15.

In Class Sectionals- Trumpets with Mr. Corpus, Pass-offs and Weekly Benchmarks

with Ms. Inglish

After School Sectionals- Middle Voices- Alto + Tenor Saxophones, F Horn

Thursdays - Band Hall open until 5:30

Warm-up- Long Tones, Lip Slurs, F Around the Room, C Minor Chorale

Curriculum- Madre 57; Marche 56-72; Simple Gifts 32-48

In Class Sectionals-Tubas with Mr. Corpus, TB/Bari with Mr. O. Pass-offs and Weekly

Benchmarks with Ms. Inglish

After School Sectionals- Low voices- Trombones, Baritones, Tubas, Baritone Sax

Fridays - Band Hall open until 3:50

        Warm-up- Long Tones, Lip Slurs, F Around the Room, C Minor Chorale

Curriculum- Full page Sightreading Day, concert recording #3

In Class Sectionals- Simple Gifts soloists with Mr. Corpus. Pass-offs and Weekly

Benchmarks with Ms. Inglish

After School Sectionals- N/A

Sectional Repertoire 

Chromatic Scale. Concert Pitch Matching where applicable. UIL Music Deep Dive.

Assessments

Our new Benchmark pages will go out the day we return from Break. KEEP THIS PAPER! There is lots of info for Self Reflection and tracking your individual progress. This will be turned in weekly for a grade.

Upcoming Events

OVERDUE!- Turn in your Paperwork! (Instrument Use, Handbook, Release, Sectionals)

Friday, January 31- Fall Band Fees are due

Wednesday, January 8- Pass Off Chart Opens

Tuesday, January 22- Chocolate Bar Fundraiser starts

Friday, January 31- Sightreading Terms page is due

Tuesday, February 4- Chocolate Bar Fundraiser ends

Wednesday, February 5- Clinic with Mr. Don Haynes (During School)

Tuesday, February 11- Clinic with Dr. Albert Lo (During School)

Monday, February 24- Pre UIL Concert

Friday, February 28- Pass off Chart Closes


TEKS addressed- Fall Semester

1  Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sound. The student demonstrates fundamental skills appropriate for a developing young musician. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances;

(B)  demonstrate detailed knowledge of tonal and rhythmic musical elements using standard terminology such as instrumentation, voicing, intervals, absolute note names, rhythmic values, and counting systems;

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of musical elements of rhythm, including whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, paired and single eighth notes, sixteenth notes, syncopated patterns and corresponding rests, and varied meters, using standard terminology;

(D)  analyze musical forms presented aurally and through music notation such as binary, ternary, phrasic, and theme and variations; and

(E)  demonstrate health and wellness concepts related to musical practice such as hand positions, hearing protection, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practice.

2  Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and writes music notation using an established system for rhythm and melody. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze music symbols and terms referring to notation; dynamics; tempi, including largo to presto; articulations, including sforzando; and previously known elements;

(B)  notate meter, rhythm, pitch, and dynamics using standard symbols in a handwritten or computer-generated format;

(C)  create complex rhythmic phrases, using known rhythms, and complex melodic phrases, using known pitches, within an established system of notation;

(D)  read music notation using appropriate cognitive and kinesthetic responses such as inner hearing, silent fingering, shadow bowing, or Curwen hand signs; and

(E)  sight-read unison, homophonic, and polyphonic music using the appropriate clef in a variety of keys and meters.

3  Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument, alone and in groups, performing a variety of unison, homophonic, and polyphonic repertoire. The student makes music at an appropriate level of difficulty and performs in a variety of genres from notation and by memory. The student is expected to:

(A)  model, alone and in groups, characteristic vocal or instrumental timbre;

(B)  perform music alone and in groups, demonstrating appropriate physical fundamental techniques such as hand position, bowing, embouchure, articulation, and posture;

(C)  perform independently and expressively, with accurate intonation and rhythm, demonstrating fundamental skills and appropriate solo, small ensemble, and large ensemble performance techniques;

(D)  perform independently and expressively a varied repertoire of music representing various styles and cultures;

(E)  sight-read independently and expressively, with accurate intonation and rhythm, demonstrating fundamental skills and appropriate solo, small ensemble, and large ensemble performance techniques in known keys and rhythms;

(F)  interpret a variety of music symbols and terms, incorporating appropriate stylistic qualities when performing, including sforzando, largo to presto, and previously known elements; and

(G)  create complex rhythmic phrases using known rhythms and complex melodic phrases using known pitches at an appropriate level of difficulty.

4  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform music such as "The Star-Spangled Banner" and "Texas, Our Texas" that is representative of diverse cultures, including American and Texas heritage;

(B)  compare and contrast written and aurally presented music representative of diverse genres, styles, periods, and cultures;

(C)  compare and contrast relationships of music content and processes to other academic disciplines such as the relationship between music and mathematics, literature, history, sciences, and language; and

(D)  describe music-related vocations and avocations.

5 Critical evaluation and response. The student listens to, responds to, and evaluates music and musical performance in both formal and informal settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  model appropriate concert and stage etiquette as an informed, actively involved listener and performer during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings;

(B)  apply criteria for listening to and evaluating musical performances;

(C)  demonstrate processes and apply the tools for self-evaluation and personal artistic improvement such as critical listening to individual and group performance recordings;

(D)  apply criteria for listening to and evaluating personal performances;

(E)  evaluate the quality and effectiveness of musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models and offer constructive suggestions for improvement; and

(F)  demonstrate appropriate cognitive and kinesthetic responses to music and musical performances.