Version: 17.0.7 Date: Mon May 14 2018 02:59:11 GMT-0500 (CDT)

FIRA Youth Laws of the Game

Mission Impossible (U19/U14)

Jacky Baltes

Educational Robotics Center

Department of Electrical Engineering

National Taiwan Normal University

Taipei, 10610, Taiwan

jacky.baltes@ntnu.edu.tw

Abstract

The following rules and regulations govern the Mission Impossible event at the FIRA Youth competition. FIRA Youth is an international event aimed at increasing interest in science and technology for junior and senior high school students by exposing them to robotics. The main goal of the mission impossible event is to provide a competition emphasizing creativity, imagination, and on the spot problem solving skills. Teams are allowed to use a limited set of materials to construct and program a robot to solve a particular problem, such as overcoming a wall or collecting treasures on a playing field. 


Latest Version of the Rules for Mission Impossible

The latest official version of the rules of the Mission Impossible event is always available from the FIRA Facebook Page.

This document also includes in the appendix a set of supplemental regulations, which are rules and requirements for previously held robot mission challenges.

Changes to the Mission Impossible event

An explicit statement was made allowing tools and materials commonly found in robotics kits. An All-round award was added in case several mission impossible events are held during a competition.

Mission Impossible

The goal of this competition is to provide an event that requires students to use their imagination and creativity to solve various problems using commonly available items such as popsicles and rubber bands and simple tools such as scissors and hammers. The students are not allowed to use any other items or tools. This levels the playing field, since teams with more expensive hardware do not have an automatic advantage. The game is inspired by the exploits of MacGyver (a popular American TV series in the 80s) and the Junkyard Wars reality TV shows.

Mission Impossible - Laws of the Game

The following laws describe the specifics of the marathon event. For general specifications relevant to all HuroCup events (e.g., robot dimensions, playing field and lighting, responsibility of the referees) please refer to General - HuroCup Laws of the Game.

[MI-1]: The Construction Zone

[MI-1.1]: Each team has access to a construction zone where they can design and built their robot.

[MI-1.2]: The minimum construction zone for each team is at least as big as one table.

[MI-2]: The Field of Play

[MI-2.1]: The makeup and dimensions of the playing field depend on the exact challenge that students must solve.

[MI-2.2]: During the construction phase, each team can request access to the playing field to test their robot. The referee will grant access to the field for short periods of time in first come first served manner. If a challenge task requires significant setup time for testing, the referee may choose instead to create a schedule for testing.

[MI-3]: Items and Tools

[MI-3.1]: Participants may use a laptop or mobile phone to program their robot.

 

[MI-3.2]: Before entering the construction zone at the start of the competition, each team will be informed about the set of items, tools, actuators, and sensors that they will be allowed to use. The limitations on these are not known by the students before the competition.

[MI-3.3]: The maximum number of continuous revolution motors allowed in a chal-

lenge will always be less than or equal to four motors. This includes standard DC motors or motors that provide position feedback (e.g., Lego NXT motors). This number is an upper limit on any robot mission challenge, however, a specific robot mission challenge may further limit the number of continuous revolution motors.

[MI-3.4]: The maximum number of servo motors allowed in a challenge will always be less than or equal to six servos. This number is an upper limit on any robot mission challenge, however, a specific robot mission challenge may further limit the number of servo motors.

[MI-3.5]: The maximum number of IR sensors allowed in a challenge will always be less than or equal to six IR sensors. This number is an upper limit on any robot mission challenge, however, a specific robot mission challenge may further limit the number of infrared sensors.

[MI-3.6]: The maximum number of ultrasonic sensors allowed in a challenge will always be less than or equal to four ultrasonic sensors.This number is an upper limit on any robot mission challenge, however, a specific robot mission challenge may further limit the number of ultra-sound sensors.

[MI-3.7]: The maximum number of touch sensors allowed in a challenge will always be less than or equal to four touch sensors. This number is an upper limit on any robot mission challenge, however, a specific robot mission challenge may further limit the number of touch sensors.

[MI-3.8]: Teams are allowed to bring and use their own commonly available tools during the competition. However, the organizers may restrict use of certain tools if they deem a tool unsafe or for other reasons.

[MI-3.9]: By allowing a tool to be used by the student in the construction area, the team leader affirms that the children know how to operate this tool safely and will take responsibility in case of any injuries or other effects resulting from intended or misuse of the tools.

[MI-3.10]: The teams are allowed to bring and use commonly available materials without restrictions. Some examples are:

See Fig.1 to see an example of a work area with associated items and tools.

[MI-3.11]: The teams are allowed to bring and use materials that are commonly found in robotics kits  without restrictions. Some examples are:

[MI-3.12] Special purpose items such as ballast tanks,  propellers, and remote controls may be provided by the competition organizers, if needed for the mission.

Figure 1: Work Area at the 1st Robot Mission Challenge Test Event

[MI-3.12]: The teams are allowed to bring and use their own commonly available and safe tools. Examples of such tools include:

Special purpose tools such as soldering irons or drills may be provided by the organizers if they are deemed necessary to complete the challenge.

[MI-3.13]: This document lists items and tools separately as a convenience for organizers. However, the use of tools and items is not limited by their classification. For example, a team may choose pliers (designated as tools) to add weight to their robot (used as items), or use pens (designated as items) to drill holes into popsicle sticks (used as tools).

[MI-3.14]: The safety of the children is of utmost importance, hence dangerous materials (e.g., aggressive chemicals) or tools (band saws) must not be used.

[MI-4]: Game Play

[MI-4.1]: The robot mission challenge event starts with the construction phase. During the construction phase children will enter the construction zone with their items and tools. They may also be provided with some additional items and tools from the organizers.

[MI-4.2]: The competition will start with the referee giving a description of the mission.

[MI-4.3]: The referee will give a description of the scoring formula being used for this event.

[MI-4.4]: The referee will announce any special restrictions or rules that may be in effect during the event.

[MI-4.5]: The referee will announce the duration of the construction phase. Whenever possible, the construction phase should last three hours.

[MI-5]: Infractions and Penalties

[MI-5.1]: Only team members are allowed to enter the construction zone or the playing field during the competition. Teachers and parents must remain outside of the designated area.

[MI-5.2]: Team members are not allowed to leave the construction zone or the playing field without prior permission of the referee.

[MI-5.3]: Any team whose members or associates violate rule MI-5.1 to MI-5.2 will be disqualified.

[MI-5.4]: . Any team whose members use additional items except those as specified by the organizers will be penalized by the referee. The sanctions imposed by the referee include time or points penalties (for example, the final score is reduced by 30%), or in serious cases may also lead to disqualification of a team. The severity of the penalty is decided on the sole discretion of the referee.

[MI-5.5]: Any team whose members use additional tools except those as specified by the organizers will be penalized by the referee. The sanctions imposed by the referee include time or points penalties (for example, the final score is reduced by 30%), or in serious cases may also include disqualification of a team. The severity of the penalty is decided on the sole discretion of the referee.

[MI-5.6]: A team that continues building or modifying their robot after the construction phase will be sanctioned or disqualified.

[MI-6]: Method of Scoring

[MI-6.1]: At the end of the construction phase, all teams must finish building their robot and bring it to the playing field.

[MI-6.2]: At that time, the referee will test the performance of the robot and will calculate the resulting score given the scoring formula.

[MI-6.3]: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, ... awards will be awarded based on the point score.

[MI-7]: All-round Event

[MI-7.1]: An event organizer may choose to host more than one mission impossible event during a competition. In that case, an award for the best All-round team will be handed out.

[MI-7.2]: At the start of the FIRA competition, the chair of the Mission Impossible competition will announce the preference for tie breakers as described in [MI-7.6]

[MI-7.3]: The best All-round team will be selected by the sum of the place score for each mission impossible event. The team will awarded 10, 8, 6, 4, 3, 2, 1 points for 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th place in a single mission impossible event.

[MI-7.4]: In case of a tie, the average of the teams that were tied will be awarded as the place score. For example, if team A wins 1st place, team B and team C tie for 2nd place, and team D wins 4th place, then the place scores awarded will be team A 10 points, team B and team C (8+6)/2 = 7 points and team C 4 points.

[MI-7.5]: In case of a tie in the sum of the place scores, then the teams will be ranked based on the maximum score in any mission impossible event. A higher maximum score is better than a lower maximum score.

[MI-7.6]: If there is still a tie after applying rule [MI-7.5], then the teams with the same sum of place scores and the same maximum score will be ranked based on the preference established by the chair of the Mission Impossible event.