LikeWise Logo-01.png

2016–17 ACADEMIC CATALOG

Volume 1, Number 1

© 2016 by the President and Faculty of Likewise College

605 East Race Avenue, Searcy AR 72143

Published annually on LikewiseCollege.org

Project Manager: Jeffrey D. Kreh, Ph.D.

Project Editor: John Paul Baker, M.A.


This catalog exists to provide the most current information about Likewise College on the subjects covered as of the date of publication. It contains information regarding the founding objectives, principles, and procedures of its services;  what one may expect of the college; and what the college expects of students. The college expects registered students to know the information in this catalog.

The catalog provides an authoritative reference for pupils, faculty, staff, and administration; and no one may waive its requirements or regulations without a written request approved in writing by the appropriate administrative officer(s). Errors may be corrected. No one should rely upon oral advice regarding the college, which differs from the catalog.

Pupils shall satisfy the degree requirements in their first-year catalog or any subsequent catalog, provided that they remain enrolled and graduate within seven years of starting in the college. Pupils who leave the college and later return shall satisfy the catalog requirements in force at the time of their return.

This publication is not an offer to enter into a contract. Likewise reserves the right to modify, eliminate, or add requirements and procedures, including without limitation: admission requirements and criteria; course offerings, or the location or frequency thereof; course content; grading requirements and procedures; degree requirements; tuition, fees, room, board, and any other rates; financial assistance programs (substantive or procedures); student disciplinary rules; support services; and any other idea contained in this catalog that can be legally revised; and to apply such modifications to any student without regard to date of admission application or enrollment.

ACCREDITATION NOTICE: Nothing herein should be interpreted as a guarantee of service or an indication that authority, certifications, or accreditations have been granted. The student should be aware that these degree programs may not transfer. The transfer of course/degree credit is determined by the receiving institution. Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board certification does not constitute an endorsement of any institution, course or degree program. Such certification merely indicates that certain minimum standards have been met under the rules and regulations of institutional certification as defined in Arkansas Code §6-61-301.

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY: Likewise admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. Also, in compliance with Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Likewise does not discriminate on the basis of sex or handicap in its educational program, activities, or employment, except where necessitated by specific religious tenets held by the institution and its controlling body.



Letter From the President

2016-10-31

ikewise begins its first year of equipping, empowering, and encouraging its participants at every level as we learn how to learn, to live, and to lead Christianly. This whole idea started in October 2003 as a “blue sky” conversation between a couple friends. We thought it would be cool to sing songs as a way to encourage the incarcerated. We wanted to help people in an otherwise hopeless situation to regain the hope that Jesus Christ offers. Not long after our first presentations in the prison system, I answered the call into prison missions.

The “blue sky” vision continued emerging as our family concerns and professional paths pulled us in different directions. One member became head of a band program at a highly reputable Christian k12. Another member became a chaplain with the Arkansas Department of Corrections. Yet another member moved to the Caribbean as a missionary. Dr. Jason Jewell joined the faculty at Faulkner University in Montgomery, Alabama, and I continued serving as a prison missionary in Arkansas.

Many of the prison inmates I have had the pleasure to meet through the years like to talk, to ask tough questions, to challenge assumptions. I quickly found myself regretting that I had dropped out of college in 1995. I knew that if I really wanted to serve the whole needs of my neighbors in prison (emotional, spiritual, physical, and intellectual), I needed to finish my education. As I brought my textbooks and primary texts to prison each Sunday (counting on having to wait . . . which if you’ve ever visited a prison, you understand), the convict saints asked questions: What are we studying this week, Doc? Are you going to leave us when you finish so that you can go teach somewhere? Why is it so hard to get a real college education in prison?

Then in December 2010, Dr. Jewell, Tim Henderson, and I started listening to the idea of starting a Christian Classical College program. In February 2013, it became clear that this vision of offering a Christian Classical College education would have the best chance of doing the most good for the most people if it served prison inmates starting inside the Arkansas prison system. Since that time, we have organized and initiated the effort that led to this letter in this catalog for this college.

“Likewise” comes from the meaning of Luke 10:25–37. To really understand our motives, you should read and reread this passage with two questions about our vision in view: What do they probably think it means to love God, neighbor, and self? and Why choose education for prison inmates over other possibilities? At some point, if you decide to join Likewise, you’ll also want to explore how you can help improve our vision.

Our mission seeks to offer a quality education that transcends popular demands. This means discovering and holding onto the knowledge, skills, and disposition needed for excellence in any future vocational, academic, or other human endeavor — while becoming more faithful to the Christ. This also means accepting the challenge of growing in our ability, capability, and capacity for self-governance.

If you think you might like to join our community, we invite you to learn as much as possible about the constructivist methods, classically humane materials, and Great Commission motives that all Likewise participants must embrace. This catalog serves as your official academic and orientation document. The faculty, staff, board, and I pledge to match your efforts as you strive to realize your potential through a Christian Classical Education. Meantime, I remain

Your servant,

 Jeffrey D. Kreh

Jeffrey D. Kreh, Ph.D.        

President and Tutor — jkreh@LikewiseInc.com        

PO BOX 2003        

Searcy Arkansas 72145



ABOUT US

Offices / Contact Us

Likewise College

PO Box 2003

Searcy Arkansas 72145

765.239.9866 (765-bey-ytoo — “765 be wise, too”)

office@LikewiseInc.com

Board of Trustees

The Likewise Inc. Board of Trustees legally controls Likewise College. The first date indicates year of appointment and the second date the year of appointment to the current officer position.

P. Timothy Henderson — Vice-Chairman, 2015, 2015.

Jason E. Jewell, Ph.D. — Chairman, 2015, 2015.

Jeffrey D. Kreh, Ph.D. — Secretary, 2015, 2015.

Article II.4 of the Likewise Inc. Bylaws states:

The number of Trustees shall be an odd number of at least three (3) but not more than a number that is necessary to carry out the governance responsibilities of the board.  At this point in the college’s development, no more than three members are needed to govern the corporation. The board’s activities include surfacing potential additions and replacements to its membership so that it may better execute the expanded responsibilities of growth and accreditation.

Administration

Jeffrey D. Kreh, Ph.D. — President

jkreh@LikewiseInc.com

Mark Farley, D.B.A. — Treasurer



Mission Statement

From the Corporate Bylaws:

We the participants of Likewise, respecting the residual image of God within all humans and desiring to equip, empower, and encourage the highest fulfillment of human potential through Constructivist methods, classically humane materials, and a Great Commission model for helping others learn how to learn, to live, and to lead Christianly, do hereby ordain and establish these Bylaws for Likewise Inc.

In plain language:

Likewise believes every human has the right to pursue the best version of existence possible. So, we use proven ways to invite the best from all of our participants: students, faculty, staff, volunteers, interns, and others. Our greatest success happens when we love people that some believe are unlovely and should not be loved; when prison inmates parole home for good; and when the children of the incarcerated embrace an unchained future.



GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

Albert Einstein once remarked, “If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first fifty-five minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.” The Likewise educational philosophy centers on learning how to ask the right questions in the right order.

Human beings seem to come into the world asking interpretive questions. Children ask interpretive questions to construct meaning from the world around them. Contemporary schools of thought refer to this type of learning as “Socratic” or “honors level” or even “conversational” learning. These “why” and “what does it mean” questions put the mind in motion to discover a better world. Einstein and other great thinkers who influence the direction of entire communities focused on learning how to ask interpretive questions.

Likewise equips participants to use interpretive questions as a historically valid way of gaining knowledge and understanding. The interpretive process works in a conversational setting through guided practice in every course. If you want to gain the greatest benefit that Likewise offers, you’ll empower yourself with the habit of interpretive inquiry. This foundational approach empowers its disciples to make wise choices and to apply learning.

Likewise participants handle primary texts written by authors from the surrounding culture’s great tradition. These texts are selected based on their interaction with the ongoing cultural conversation that stretches back to Homer, Moses, and other authors of antiquity through the present day. Consequently, Likewise exposes participants to excellent examples of literary skill, philosophical expression, and historical significance. Against these texts, Likewise participants exercise their newfound interpretive powers. By so doing, we all learn to interpret a conversation that has gone on for the past fifty or so centuries.

More than this, however, Likewise scholars join the conversation through a variety of assignments. These assignments invite us to imitate great authors as we discover our own voice. Along the way, we follow the ancient command of self-examination that the Apostle Paul gave the Corinthian church and that the Greek artisans chiseled into the archway above the entry to the Temple of Delphi: Know thyself.

Several learning activities guide our intellectual development at Likewise. Talented professionals join students to improve their own skills in close reading, active listening, expressive writing, and relevant and focused conversation. Students learn the habit of interpreting information, whether written or coming at us in daily life — which is essential for success in an “Information Age.” Better interpretations lead to better choices. Better choices lead to a life of greater harmony and productivity. By learning to seek a life that encourages harmony, our participants discover also how to lead others to do the same. This entire process reflects what we mean by the phrase: “to learn, to live, and to lead Christianly.”

We need to say something about what the adverb “Christianly” means to us. Certain acts and beliefs have been connected to Christendom throughout history. However, Likewise does not automatically embrace these as “Christian” acts and beliefs. We expect a serious, prolonged, and open-minded investigation of the Bible from our academic community. Where inconsistencies exist between Christian principles and the actions of those who are represented as acting officially on behalf of Christianity, Likewise encourages the Christian virtue of seeking the most charitable interpretation of the original actors’ motivations within their historical setting and circumstances. Because we want others to be fair when interpreting our actions, we take time to understand before we judge.

Likewise encourages interpretive questions in all its studies. The rules of fairness require an honest attempt at accurate interpretation, which precedes evaluation — for how can we judge until we carefully examine? Also, evaluation ought to precede application — for why should we swallow an untested idea, value, or principle? And because no living human can rightly claim omniscience, Likewise believes we come closest to understanding truth when we explore questions in a similarly dedicated community.

These thoughts give us a beginning point for discovering — as a community of dedicated truth seekers — what it means to equip, empower, and encourage others in their pursuit to fulfill the highest human potential. Our method relies on interpretive process. Our materials come from classically humane literature. Our motives flow from helping others learn how to learn, to live, and to lead Christianly. We envision a community that grows more and more able to embrace the high-calling of self-governance. Consequently, each participant — whether a less traveled novice or a more traveled professional — partners as equal in search of the human flourishing that only results from self-governance.

The value of an education in a liberal arts college is not the learning of many facts but the training of the mind to think something that cannot be learned from textbooks.
~ Albert Einstein

All genuine learning is active, not passive. It involves the use of the mind, not just memory. It is a process of discovery, in which the student is the main agent, not the teacher. . . . The more there is questioning and discussion, the more enlivened the class hour and the better the understanding of the subject being taught.
~ Mortimer Adler

The finest achievement of human society and its rarest pleasure is Conversation.
~ Jacques Barzun

The truth of things, which must be our concern always, is revealed through words rightly used and rightly taken. That revelation is the art of all liberal arts.
~ Marion Montgomery

Impatience to interrupt others, and the uneasiness of being interrupted are faults toward conversation and difficult to remedy.
~ Jonathan Swift

In conversation we form the interpersonal ties that bind individuals together in personal relationships.
~ Walter Ong

Conversation is what binds us into a people.
~ Diane McWhorter

Developing one’s ear and tongue to value meaning is what we call education.
~ Marion Montgomery

How does the teacher aid discovery and elicit the activity of the student’s mind? By inviting and entertaining questions, by encouraging and sustaining inquiry . . . by leading discussions . . . .
~ Mortimer Adler



CODE OF CONDUCT

In order to encourage, achieve, and maintain an atmosphere of high integrity, trust, competence, and harmony among all participants, each member of the Likewise community commits to the following:

1. Mission: Our mission is to offer a quality education that transcends popular demands. We seek to instill the knowledge, skills, and disposition needed for excellence in any future vocational, academic, or other human endeavor — while becoming more faithful to the Christ.

2. Individual Goals and Teamwork: We hereby agree to commit ourselves to the pursuit of perfection with regard to our integrity, competence, and individual responsibility. In recognition of each participant’s personal goal of achieving happiness, each of us commits to pursue teamwork, because Together Everyone Accomplishes More.

3. Personal Responsibility and Initiative: We agree to take full responsibility for our actions as well as those of fellow participants and our overall Mission. We are personally responsible for our training, time commitments, performance and participating in and contributing toward achieving the Mission and practicing the Code of Conduct. We commit to manage ourselves, to be principally responsible for the planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling functions with respect to our Mission. To personally take the initiative to coordinate our responsibilities and activities with other participants, to develop opportunities for improvement and for making good things happen. In coordinating with our fellow participants, we commit to (a) communicate and consult with other parties who are likely to be meaningfully affected when initiating a change of any sort, (b) seek the input of others who we believe have additional and substantive expertise related to the proposal.

4. Tolerance: It is understood that individuals differ in many ways — their values, tastes, moods and methods to achieve goals. It is agreed that these types of differences between individual participants, which do not directly affect our Mission, will be respected and tolerated.

5. Conflict Resolution: We will use the “Participant Grievance Process” as intended:

Differences between human beings are a natural and necessary aspect of life, especially in the pursuit of excellence. Differences may vary from how to answer the phone, to what type of oil to use in a gearbox, to what equipment to purchase to improve operations, to whether one is following our principles or advancing our Mission, to how a person combs their hair. To gain agreement and move forward, you agree to use the following process:

6. Caring and Sharing: To the degree that participants care about themselves, their friends and relatives, fellow participants, suppliers, customers, the environment, the Mission, Principles and facilities, etc., each of us will come closer to achieving our personal goals. In caring for others, each participant commits to (1) share relevant information with others, (2) take initiative to forward information that he or she believes may be helpful to another's activities, even if it is not asked for, and (3) responding to respectful inquiries made of him or her by other participants in a respectful and responsive manner.

7. Doing What is Right: Live, speak and endeavor to find the truth.

Willful ignorance or inconsideration of this code may result in an initiation of the “Participant Grievance Process” — which can escalate to non-academic probation or expulsion. A loss of legal status due to due process results in automatic expulsion without the possibility of readmission (e.g., being busted for drugs and dropping from Class I status with the ADC to Class IV, etc.). In such an event, the student may request a copy of his or her transcript using the “Participant Grievance Process” — which will be elevated to the President level. Requests of this nature may require the expelled student to pay for the cost of services rendered to the student by the college (to be calculated upon request and based on the 75% level of tuition charged by similar institutions of higher learning in the United States of America according to http://collegecost.ed.gov/catc/#). In the unlikely event that a student expelled due to loss of legal status elects to purchase a copy of his or her transcript at such a cost, Likewise will donate the funds to a qualified 501(c)3 organization for the support of orphans.

“What then,” you say, “do the liberal studies contribute nothing to our welfare?” Very much in other respects, but nothing at all as regards virtue. For even these arts of which I have spoken, though admittedly of a low grade—depending as they do, upon handiwork—contribute greatly toward the equipment of life, but nevertheless have nothing to do with virtue. And if you inquire, “Why, then, do we educate our children in the liberal studies?” it is not because they can bestow virtue, but because they prepare the soul for the reception of virtue. Just as that “primary course,” as the ancients called it, in grammar, which gave boys their elementary training, does not teach them the liberal arts, but prepares the ground for their early acquisition of these arts, so the liberal arts do not conduct the soul all the way to virtue, but merely set it going in that direction.
~ Seneca



ADHE STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

Complaint Process

Institutions must publish, post, and adhere to a procedure for handling a student grievance. Institutions also must furnish a telephone number and e-mail address for quick access in filing a student grievance. For Likewise, the “Participant Grievance Process” fulfills this requirement.

Students must follow the institution’s published student grievance process before contacting the Arkansas Department of Higher Education (ADHE). Grievance policies can usually be found in the academic catalog, student handbook, or institution’s website.

Grievances regarding student grades or conduct violations are governed entirely by institutional policy and Arkansas law and will not be considered by ADHE.

If a student must report an unresolved grievance, the student may contact ADHE at ICAC@adhe.edu. Resolutions by ADHE are final.

Students must submit a written grievance to ADHE. The grievant also must provide written documentation from the college/university verifying that the institution’s appeal process has been followed.

Institutions must inform ADHE of all unresolved formal grievances annually.



ADHE STUDENT COMPLAINT FORM

Name:

Address:

Phone number:

E-mail address:

Affiliation with institution named below:

_____ current student                         _____ former student

_____ parent or guardian of student         _____ other

Institution:

Degree level and major of student:

Date of attendance at institution:

Start: ____________        End: ____________

Have you gone through institution’s formal complaint process?

If yes, attach documentation that you have gone through the complaint process.

If no, please explain in your detailed complaint description why you were unable to complete the complaint process. ADHE will only address complaints after the student has exhausted his or her appeals at the institutional level.

Complaint Description

Describe your complaint in detail, including the names of any faculty or staff you contacted about the complaint.

Give titles and contact information for the faculty or staff you contacted.

Will you be submitting additional documentation regarding this complaint?

By submitting this form, I affirm that I am a current or former student of the institution named above or the parent or guardian of a current or former student who is currently under age 18 and under my legal guardianship. I agree to allow the Arkansas Department of Higher Education to submit a copy of my complaint to the above named institution for a response. I further authorize the institution to transmit student records related to me or the individual under my guardianship affected by the institution’s actions to the Arkansas Department of Higher Education for review. The information I have provided to the Arkansas Department of Higher Education is complete, true, and correct to the best of my knowledge.

Print name:         ____________________________________________

Signature:         ____________________________________________

Date:                 __________________



STUDENT SERVICES

Admissions

Admissions Requirements

Admissions Process

Entrance Considerations

Likewise uses an applicant’s performance in TR-1000 and HUM-1310 to determine his or her aptitude and background to benefit from the course or degree.

Standardized Assessments

Likewise uses no standardized assessments other than the evaluation essay and the evaluation course when determining placement. Performance in the certified college level course demonstrates ability, capacity, or capability to benefit. An invitation to retake TR-1000 is perpetually extended.

Testing for Benefit

Likewise administers a proprietary Word Analogy Test at the start of a student’s first term, between terms, and at the end of coursework to aid the faculty in assessing its proficiency regarding the student’s intellectual progress. Findings are used to aid research relevant to student development and revise the curriculum as needed.

 

Remediation Assistance

Likewise does not offer an official remediation program. Students admitted to LIkewise have already demonstrated adequate ability regarding general reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills for participation in text-driven conversational learning. Likewise encourages students who prove unable to handle the academic rigor to enroll in another program of study. As a way to preemptively address weaknesses in Math and Science, Likewise makes the Math and Science portions of the Kahn Academy curriculum available to students through the ADC unit’s Chapel. All students who complete HUM-1310 must complete the Math videos and exercises up to the College Algebra level prior to entrance into the AA degree program. Students who earn less than a 2.0 GPA in Science and/or Math courses must complete the appropriate section in the Kahn Academy curriculum prior to reenrollment in the unsatisfactorily completed course(s).

Academic Advising

A number of advisers (called “ombudsmen”) appropriate to student demand may:

Registration

Orientation

Important Policies

Financial Aid / Financial Aid Program Policy Disclosures

N/A - Likewise does not participate in any financial aid programs that potentially burden students.

Tuition Refund Policy

N/A - Students do not have a financial stake in their education.

Tutoring Policy

Every student is assigned a faculty tutor and mentor as part of normal course activity.

Student Identity Verification Procedures

Prospects produce a handwritten essay in the physical presence of faculty prior to admission into TR-1000: The Books of Luke. Faculty digitally store this essay for future reference. Authorized volunteer typesetters transcribe digitized student work. Faculty subject the transcribed version to online analysis when questions of originality arise. Faculty also compare the digitized version with the initial verified handwriting example when questions of authenticity arise. Faculty administer end of term oral exams either in person or using face-to-face technology to test the student’s development across all course interactions for the term.

Experiential Credit Policy

Likewise grants no credits at this time for experiences that occur outside the college’s official coursework.

Notification of Acceptance

Authorized faculty deliver a signed notice of acceptance to qualified students within 4–6 weeks of the start of the term for the semester that the students will enter the college program.

Denial of Admission

Authorized personnel deliver a signed notice of denial of admission to students who fail to satisfactorily complete TR-1000 or HUM-1310. All others receive notice of placement on the waiting list for acceptance.

Change of Contact Information

If you move or change your email or telephone number, you need to contact the office using one of the methods contained in this catalog.

Student ID Cards

Likewise does not plan to produce student ID cards at this time.

Learning Differences and Accommodations

Likewise College recognizes that learning styles vary and learning differences exist among students. Physical or psychological conditions often contribute to these situations. Any student who requests specific accommodations should submit documentation verifying the need for eligibility under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, as amended, and Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This documentation should be sent through the student’s ombudsman to the Dean’s office at least 15 days prior to the beginning of a course or program. Documentation should include:

Likewise College reviews all requests for accommodation to determine if the accommodations can be met reasonably and feasibly. If so, the student and his or her ombudsman — along with any involved faculty members — draft a plan for accommodations. While Likewise College desires to assist all students, certain services are not feasible and cannot be provided by the college. For example, Likewise College is not able to provide personal tutors or assist with technology. We also cannot compromise its academic standards or course components.


Students may initiate the “Participant Grievance Process” to appeal any ruling regarding accommodations.

Student Privacy

Under the provisions of the federal law known as the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), eligible students, or where applicable, the parents of the students, are afforded certain rights pertaining to college records and personally identifiable information on file with the institution. An eligible student is defined as any person who is currently enrolled or has been enrolled in the institution’s programs. It is the policy of the institution to treat all student information, both personal and academic, as strictly confidential. Student information will only be released after appropriate written permission has been obtained.

Student records are maintained and viewed only by authorized Likewise College personnel. Under no circumstance is student information divulged to the general public without the student’s consent. Students are not permitted to view other students’ personal information. Student data are maintained electronically and/or in hard copy and protected from unauthorized access.

Students can request to have their names withheld from public view in the online list of graduates. Student names, personal testimonies, and pictures are published only with a student’s written consent (email is a valid form of written consent).

Academic Resources

The ADC currently prohibits prison inmates from unrestricted internet access. Because Likewise relies on primary sources and the interpretive process, a basic academic reference library to supplement the supplied texts/readers will be placed on loan in the Chapel library where program activities are conducted. As students demonstrate interest and need, campaigns both to secure library materials and to construct dedicated library space within the prison will be launched. However, the core student library will be their personal collection of course texts/readers.

Graduation Ceremonies

It is the policy of the college that students who satisfy all eligibility criteria and requirements for graduation shall be designated as "graduates." All graduates are invited to attend our annual graduation ceremony (location to be negotiated). The event respectfully celebrates your accomplishment. We plan for an event that is festive and filled with camaraderie, where students adorned in caps and gowns receive their diplomas or certificates. Our goal is that family and friends may also attend to celebrate your accomplishment. Your diploma or certificate, and transcript, will be mailed within 7 to 10 days of graduation. You may request a copy of your Likewise College transcript using the “Participant Grievance Process”or by calling the office at 765.239.9866. Your first transcript is free. Additional transcripts are $10.00 each.

Honors Graduates

At graduation, there are three categories of honors for graduates:

Students must complete a minimum of 50 credits at Likewise College to be eligible for Latin honors. Only coursework completed at Likewise College is taken into account in the computation of graduation honors.

Career Counseling and Placement

Likewise is pursuing a formal arrangement with City Connections — a LIttle Rock nonprofit that currently provides various line-level opportunities for parolees — to provide graduates with job placement services and opportunities upon parole. For graduates of the A.S.E. program, the capstone project involves putting together a business plan for the student’s own business. However, because neither proposed degree falls within the traditional definition of a vocational degree, Likewise has no formal career counseling or placement program. Instead, exit and alumni advisors help graduates become aware of the wide variety of educational and vocational opportunities available to college graduates. An alumni network guided by the success of the Hudson Link alumni program will be designed and implemented at the appropriate time.

Technology Requirements

Likewise uses a hybrid approach for its programs. When practical, Likewise conducts activities through technology (i.e., Google Hangouts for the homebound, parolees, etc.). When technology proves impractical (e.g., inside ADC Prison Units), faculty visit the location of confinement on a regular basis to ensure the same level of interaction enjoyed by technology-capable participants. The ADC maintains accredited facilities according to the requirements specified by its governing regulatory agency. These ADC spaces typically fall under the jurisdiction of its Office of Chaplaincy Services (i.e., barracks, chapels, visitation spaces, etc.).

Likewise uses Google Apps for Education (GAfE). Each technology-capable participant must obtain a suitably private space with internet access adequate for quality synchronous interactions. The minimum required technology for quality participation through the internet is as follows:

Course Delivery Methods — All Participants

All participants receive a Likewise branded GAfE account. For technology-capable participants, 100% of the courses transpire through the suite of GAfE tools. Access to course materials (i.e., texts, video lectures, support materials, syllabi, online synchronous and asynchronous forums for interactions, etc.) depends upon enrollment through the supplied GAfE account. Likewise provides course assignments and the tools for completion, evaluation, and reporting of assignments through each participant’s GAfE account.

Course Delivery Methods — Technology-Impaired Participants

For technology-impaired participants, Likewise facilitates the 3 credit hour introductory course, 25 credit hour LOCKSTEP PROGRAM, 4 credit hour CAPSTONE PROJECT, and the majority of the 30 credit hour BLOC PROGRAM using the suite of GAfE tools by proxy with the remaining hours occurring in the place of confinement. This translates to at least 70% of the Associate of Arts in Humanities degree occurring at a distance. Likewise delivers the 14 credit hour Associate of Science in Entrepreneurship in a similar fashion. This translates to at least 70% of the Associate of Science degree occurring at a distance. 

Technology-impaired participants sign a release for authorized faculty and staff to act as their GAfE account proxy when filling out the application for admission. This release allows faculty and staff to support technology-impaired participants during scheduled synchronous interactions by delivering assignments, evaluations, and reports from each technology-impaired participant’s GAfE account. Faculty and staff digitize these participants’ completed assignments and to post them into the GAfE system at their earliest convenience. The GAfE system then notifies the appropriate faculty and staff to begin their normal asynchronous support activities. Faculty and staff retrieve and print completed evaluations and reports from the GAfE system and deliver these documents directly to each participant, assuring the same level of service enjoyed by technology-capable participants.

Outsourcing Contracts

Likewise contracts with GAfE for the use of its tools under conditions that educational institutions normally enjoy. Faculty, staff, and volunteers conduct all other activities related to the learning process.

Data Security

GAfE provides security for its users through a combination of a unique username and password. Likewise maintains access — both in the cloud and on physical backup drives in the office — to all documents for providing support to technology-impaired participants. Faculty and staff with direct access to student documents sign an agreement to protect student records prior to proxy authorization.

What must be said and insisted upon as the end of all our endeavor to promote liberal education—ultimate earthly end of liberal arts training—must always be to prepare a particular man to hear, really hear, Oedipus’s agonized cry so well that he knows agony as never before.
~ Marion Montgomery

As arms, legs, hands, hearts, brains, lungs, and all the other body parts make a single human body—and as the plot, characters, setting, theme, and style make up a single story—all these subjects in the curriculum make up a single thing: an education, an e-ducare, a leading-out and leading-up into the light. It is a change, like an operation or a birth: a change in the student. It is a change from darkness to light, from small mind to large mind, that is, from ignorance to knowledge, and (much more important) from folly to wisdom.
~ Peter Kreeft

What is known as “modern” thought is largely the attempt to solve the classical human questions without recourse to either tradition. Any adequate concept of “liberal arts” and “liberal education” would, to be intellectually complete and honest, have to attend to the Greek and Roman classical traditions, to the Hebrew and Christian revelation, to the patristic and medieval experience, and finally to modern claims, especially those arising from science and politics, even when they claim to be “autonomous.”
~ James V. Schall



Academic Policies and Procedures

Time Requirements

Students should expect to spend a minimum of 15 hours participating in instructional activities during for each credit hour taken; and to spend a minimum of twice as much time preparing for instructional activities as is spent in instructional activities. Refer to the “Academic Calendar” for the specific duration of a given semester.

Extensions

Likewise expects students to complete all course requirements before the scheduled end of the course. Faculty may accept or reject student requests for an extension to complete course requirements at their own discretion. The faculty decision regarding such requests is final, but may be subject to the “Participant Grievance Process.” The student is advised to follow his or her conscience in requesting extension and/or initiation the grievance process. More than this, however, students are encouraged to approach all coursework with the integrity required to finish with excellence.

Satisfactory Progress Policy

Faculty shall monitor each student’s progress between each assigned activity. When a student’s performance falls below the 2.5 GPA mark, the associated faculty shall notify the student using private means of communication and advise the way(s) the student can take advantage of additional opportunities for improvement.

Proctored Exams / Assessments

Likewise uses an oral exam procedure that makes proctored exams unnecessary. Faculty continually assesses student performance in every synchronous activity.The “Student Identity Verification Procedures” mitigate the need for proctoring asynchronous activities.

Retake Policy

If a student fails to complete a course for any reason, then natural consequences require that the student receive the appropriate mark (e.g., “I” for incomplete, “W” for withdrawn). When this happens, the student must wait to attempt completion until the course offering schedule allows it. In such cases, faculty respect the student’s need for a fresh start and do not hold previous performance or the lack thereof to influence the grading requirements of the reattempted completion. In other words, if you blow a course for any reason, you may only take it again when offered and start from the beginning with the rest of the class. You must live above suspicion with regard to prison disciplinary actions if you wish to enjoy the “out of prison” culture that Likewise offers.

Grading Policy

Letter grades (A, B, C, D, or F) will be awarded at the end of every semester in each course, except for classes provided on a pass/no pass basis. The grading system is based on a 4.0 scale, and it may be qualified by a “+” — except in the case of an “A” — or “–” — except in the case of an “F” — worth 0.3 grade points. A minimum grade-point average of 2.3 is required for graduation.

Any letter grade higher than an F+ is a passing grade.

Faculty awards students grades based on the coursework turned in by the end of the course, unless extension arrangements have been made between the student and the tutor. If a student does not officially withdraw from a course on or before the withdrawal deadline listed on the Academic Calendar, then a grade will be given for the course based on the work done and not done.

Academic grades appear on report cards and transcripts.

Dropped Courses

The last day to withdraw from classes is three weeks before the last day of the semester. Students who want to withdraw from (drop) a class must petition for the change using the “Participant Grievance Process” — which automatically elevates to the President level. If a student withdraws from a course on or before the “last day to withdraw from classes” on the Academic Calendar, his or her transcript will show a ‘W’. Otherwise, Faculty must assign the grade earned for the course.

Incomplete Courses

If a student foresees that he or she will not be able to complete course work by the end of the semester, the student may request an incomplete grade (‘I’) using the “Participant Grievance Process” — which automatically elevates to the President level. If the student’s request for an incomplete is granted, the “Leave of Absence Policy” applies. If the student does not complete the class in the allotted time, the ‘I’ will remain on his or her transcript without the credits counting toward his GPA and the “Retake Policy” applies; The repeated class will appear as a separate class on the student’s transcript.

Repeated Course GPA Impact

Courses passed (with grades A to D) on the first attempt may be repeated only once. The higher grade received in the two attempts is used in the calculation of semester and cumulative grade-point averages. If a student is unable to pass a course, he or she may repeat it, regardless of matriculation status, until a passing grade (A to D) is earned. After the first non-failing grade is earned, a student has the option of repeating the course once to improve his grade. The higher grade earned after the course is repeated once is used in the calculation of semester and cumulative grade-point averages.

For example, if a student fails the three-credit course SCI-2380 at the first attempt, and he or she repeats the course but is still unable to pass it. On the third attempt, the student passes SCI-2380 with the grade of D, but decides to take the option of repeating the course once more to improve on the passing grade he earned. On the final attempt, the student earns the grade of C. The higher passing grade, C, will be used in the calculation of the semester and cumulative grade-point average for the student.

Code of Ethics / Academic Integrity

Academic integrity means fully-integrated honesty in scholarship. Students and faculty alike must obey rules of honest scholarship, which means that all academic work should result from an individual’s own efforts. Academic dishonesty hurts the offender. The college invites non-fatal failure, which means failing from time-to-time offers us the ability to improve. It is better to fail on our own merits than to succeed in a given assignment dishonestly. Academic integrity, like all character-related issues, offers the opportunity of the personal heroism that only exists in the face of adversity. The student who grows steadily through embracing academic integrity demonstrates honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility. This growth supports our ability to succeed with self-governance. A faculty member suspecting a student of failure to grow in this area may initiate the “Participant Grievance Process” — which may lead to academic probation and even immediate expulsion from the college.

Leave of Absence Policy

There are two types of student leave of absence (LOA): voluntary (planned and initiated) and involuntary. If the LOA is involuntary, it may be disciplinary or non-disciplinary in nature. If the LOA is disciplinary in nature, it may be due to academic or ADC challenges. Likewise can offer no alternative to the “Retake Policy” for disciplinary-based LOAs.

Likewise works with ADC to avoid all other involuntary LOAs. If a student is involuntarily removed from the college without a registered disciplinary reason, then Likewise invites without reservation the return of the student to their academic program. Students who find themselves in this situation will receive an “I” and may be allowed to complete outside the normal academic offering schedule at the discretion of available faculty. In these cases, faculty makes every effort to help the student complete their program requirements within a mutually understood reasonable amount of time.

Students on voluntary LOA may re-enroll upon return. However, in these cases the “Retake Policy” applies. Choosing to self-remove during a course results in a “W” and places the student on automatic probation status.

Graduation Requirements

A student may request consideration for graduation only within the final 24 credit hours of his or her official degree choice. The student must make his or her request using the “Participant Grievance Process” before the last day of the semester immediately prior to the desired graduation exercise — which automatically elevates to the President level.The College Dean must then verify that a student has completed or will reasonably complete all the required coursework for the requested degree in time for the next scheduled graduation exercise. The College Dean only grants graduate candidacy status to a student who 1) will be able to complete the curriculum with no less than a 2.5 GPA before the next scheduled graduation exercise and 2) received no final course grades below a 2.0 GPA. Once the Dean determines a student’s graduate candidacy status, the Dean informs the graduation applicant of what corrective action may be required before candidacy can be conferred and, in the case of a successful application, the date of the next scheduled graduation exercise for which the candidate is approved to participate.

Student Progress Procedure

A faculty assigned review committee annually assesses each student's progress in the spring term. This review relies upon a brief statement of progress and accomplishments prepared by the student, reports from the ombudsman and other faculty (including, for example, instructors and committee members), grades, and other relevant information. The committee makes recommendations regarding continuation in the program at the annual review meeting. A recommendation to continue in the program depends on the student's satisfactory progress toward fulfillment of requirements for the degree. The committee informs each student of the results of the annual review in a letter. The letter may also include additional advice and recommendations from the faculty.

If a student fails to make satisfactory progress in the program, the annual review letter includes a warning that specifies the problems, and how and by when they must be corrected. The warning may specify that failure to correct the problems could result in probation. The student’s ombudsman receives a notice regarding the letter.

If a student warned of the possibility of probation fails to heed the warning, he or she will be placed on probation for a maximum of two terms, not counting the summer term. The committee chair brings a recommendation for probation to full faculty for ratification. The faculty then instructs the student’s ombudsman to request a jointly written advisory letter from the Director of the student’s program and the review committee. The ombudsman delivered copies of the letter to the student and to the office of Dean. The student and his or her ombudsman sign mutually agreeable remediation plan specifying what must be accomplished by when in order for the student to be removed from probationary status.

A student on probation will be subject to dismissal from the program at the end of the period of probation, unless he or she has successfully completed the remediation plan. The student's ombudsman certifies in writing to the Director of the student’s program Director that the remediation plan has or has not been successfully completed. The Director of the student’s program advises the full faculty of this for ratification of either the student's removal from probation or of the student's dismissal from the College.

Students may receive written warnings of unsatisfactory progress at other times than the annual review. The student's ombudsman and program faculty may initiate such warnings, which come from the Director of the student’s program. Like annual review warnings, these may specify that a student could be placed on probation, and they enter the student's file. A student whose GPA falls below 2.0 is automatically placed on probation by the office of the Dean.

Transfer Credits

Due to the integrated and holistic nature of our curricular design, and to encourage our students to enjoy the full Likewise experience, we generally only accept incoming Freshmen regardless of previous college work. Previous college work may prove useful, but no agency requires Likewise to accept these courses as fulfilling our requisites. We might make exceptions depending upon the liberal arts educational philosophy of the previous college. In such cases, Likewise recognizes the accreditation standards and commonly accepted academic standards of American universities regarding transfer credit. However, credit acceptance is at the discretion of Likewise College. Students take the degree programs at Likewise in cohorts, which makes exemption from a required class unlikely.

Likewise accepts in transfer only those credits earned in an institution accredited by a regional or national accrediting body duly recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or comparable foreign body. The institution accepts transfer courses for which the student received a “Pass” or “C” or higher grade for the course. Credits must be unduplicated and must match the specific requirements for a Likewise College degree. Regardless of transferred credits, each student must complete his or her Likewise College coursework to qualify for graduation. No credits are given for non-school learning or life experiences.

In the rare event that a student qualifies for transfer credit; and desires entrance into the A.S.E. program, the same pre-admission requirements that govern the A.A.H. still apply. Approved transfer students must also complete a full semester’s worth of A.A.H. coursework before beginning the A.S.E program. This requirement results in a minimum of 28 hours from the college for graduation.

Acceptance of Credit Transfer

Credits from Likewise College are transferable to other American universities at the discretion of the receiving institution. Likewise cannot guarantee the acceptance of any transfer credits at another institution. The student should be aware that these degree programs may not transfer. The transfer of course/degree credit is determined by the receiving institution.

It would not be wrong to describe “liberal education” as the effort to experience the proper pleasure due to knowing, according to what they are, all the things that are—seeing, tasting, listening, touching, smelling, remembering, imagining, knowing, thinking, and believing.
~ James V. Schall



Faculty Directory

In the alphabetical directory of the Likewise College faculty that follows, each is listed with his or her degree and professional credentials, rank, and/or title. The first date indicates the year of employment, the second date the year of appointment to the present rank, and the third date the year of appointment to a current administrative position. An asterisk (*) indicates faculty on leave of absence.

Full-Time Faculty (pending contractual agreement):

Kelly Burton, M.A. Philosophy (Arizona State University)

Tutoring Faculty - Humanities, Philosophy. 2016, 2016.

Christopher A. Butynskyi, Ph.D. (Faulkner University)

Tutoring Faculty - Humanities, History, Philosophy, Literature. 2016, 2016.

Jeffrey D. Kreh, Ph.D. (Faulkner University)

Tutoring Faculty - Humanities, History, Philosophy, Religion, and President. 2016, 2016, 2015.

Bryant K. Owens, M.Div. (The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) 2009.

Tutoring Faculty - Humanities, Philosophy, Religion. 2016, 2016.

Stephen Mitchell, M.S. (Pensacola Christian College), M.A. (University of North Carolina at Greensboro) — on sabbatical (PH.D. Dissertation)

Tutoring Faculty - Humanities, Literature, Communications. 2016, 2016.

David Withun, M.A. Humanities (Faulkner University)

Tutoring Faculty - Humanities, Literature. 2016, 2016.

Part-Time Faculty (pending contractual agreement):

Dale Lendrum, BA, Communication Studies (California State University, Long Beach)

Tutoring Faculty - Communications. 2016.

Kenneth Olree, PhD, Biomedical Engineering (Utah State University)

Tutoring Faculty - STEM. 2016.

Mark Farley, MBA, Business Administration (Arkansas State University, Jonesboro)

Tutoring Faculty - Business and Treasurer. 2016.

Office Hours

Monday: 8:30am–3:00pm

Tuesday–Friday: 1:00-3:00pm

Messages may be left during non-office hours. Personnel generally respond within 1–2 business days. Emergency-related messages should be submitted through the contact form on the website.

Faculty Availability

Although all administrators, staff, and faculty perform duties every weekday when academic programs are active, students should allow personnel ample time to respond. Assignments may be graded on a weekly or monthly schedule. Specific questions may demand some research time. Advisors and Faculty do not keep standard office hours, but they can be reached by e-mail at any time. Faculty members are available on a weekly basis in the prison units where services are offered. They provide an open channel to other faculty or staff with whom any given student may need to communicate. Additionally, the student’s assigned ombudsman is available via USPS and/or prison faculty to provide detailed assistance with institutional matters.

Holiday Schedule

The office will be closed during semesters when academic programs are inactive and for all US Federal holidays, including the full week of Independence Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years.



ACADEMIC CALENDARS

2016–17 Calendar

Spring Semester:

*due to scheduling and logistical challenges beyond our control, the semester start-date and activities have been altered

Summer Semester (sufficient demand impossible)

It is this exciting freedom to take into our souls what we are not, to take it in without changing or destroying what we take in, that constitutes the purpose of the liberal arts, which are designed to teach us how to be open to the various levels of being.
~ James V. Schall

A liberal arts education provides the means for your discovering your lineage, the opportunity for you to winnow your inheritance.
~ Marion Montgomery

That is what significant education must be most concerned with, the cleaning and ordering of the head and heart, into which place may come a various company indeed.
~ Marion Montgomery

The classical “Liberal Arts” tradition of the West once offered a form of humane education that sought the integration of faith and reason, and that combined the arts and the sciences, before these things became separated, fragmented, and trivialized.
~ Stratford Caldecott


2017–18 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester:

Spring Semester:

Summer Semester:

Liberal learning enables those who benefit from its discipline to achieve some degree of harmony within them.
~ Russell Kirk

The direct product of liberal education is a good mind, well disciplined in its processes of inquiring and judging, knowing and understanding, and well furnished with knowledge, well cultivated by ideas.
~ Mortimer Adler

The Point for the liberal arts teacher to keep in mind is that the trivium and quadrivium were established before the pragmatic advantages of those disciplines appeared, developed out of the natural desire of man to know, not because they were immediately practical.
~ Marion Montgomery


2018–19 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester:

Spring Semester:

Summer Semester:

The function of liberal education is to conserve a body of received knowledge and to impart an apprehension of order to the rising generation.
~ Russell Kirk

When I say that we experience an increased need for truly liberal learning, I am recommending something to leaven the lump of modern civilization—something that would give us a tolerable number of people in many walks of life who would possess some share of right reason and moral imagination; who would not shout the price of everything, but would know the value of something; who would be schooled in wisdom and virtue.
~ Russell Kirk



ADVISORS

Although Likewise maintains no official Advisory Board, several informal advisory groups have provided counsel to the Board of Trustees, President, Faculty, and Staff.

Executive Advisory Group

This group provides counsel at the executive level to the college president and board of trustees. The focus of counsel centers on organizational leadership, developing cultural values, and maintaining virtue in the face of the temptations unique to executives. Special attention has been paid to institutional mission, institutional culture, and financing.

Bruce McLarty — President, Harding University, Searcy AR

Mike Williams — President, Faulkner University, Montgomery AL

Howard Norton — President (Ret.), Baxter Institute, Tegucigalpa Honduras

Shawn Mathis — President, Onsomble Inc., Nashville TN

Advancement Advisory Group

This group provides counsel regarding fundraising strategies. The focus of counsel centers on raising awareness, developing volunteers, and building an active donor base. Special attention has been paid to raising funds through individuals and religious institutions.

 

Tim Bruner — Special Assistant to the President, York College, York NE

Jay Weatherford — Executive Director, Wright County Community Action, Saint Michael MN

Wayne Baker — Interim Vice President of University Advancement, Faulkner University

Randy Willingham — Professor and Director of the Center for Spiritual Leadership, Harding University

General Counsel

Paul D. Love — Attorney, Heritage Law Office PLLC, Searcy AR

Admissions Practices

Stacey Vaughn — Assistant Director of Admissions, Harding University

Academic Affairs Advisory Group

This group provides counsel regarding best practices in higher education. The focus of counsel centers on documentation, program and course development, and regulatory compliance. Special attention has been paid to developing the academic programs for the Associate of Arts in Humanities and its future expansion to a baccalaureate program.

Tod Martin — Registrar, Harding University

Larry Long — Distinguished Professor and Provost, Harding University

Robert Woods — Headmaster, The Covenant School, Dallas TX

Jason Jewell — Department Chair and Professor of the Humanities, Faulkner University

Kelly Burton — Philosophy Faculty, Paradise Valley Community College, Phoenix AZ

David Withum — History Faculty, Savannah Classical Academy, Savannah GA

Bryant Owens — Interim Senior Pastor, Bangham Heights Baptist Church, Cookeville TN

Christopher Butynskyi — History Professor, Eastern University, St. Davids PA

Alana Boles — Program Specialist, Arkansas Department of Higher Education, Little Rock AR

Rosslyn Elliott — Author, Thomas Nelson Publishing, Cabot AR

Kathy Dillion — Associate Professor of English, Harding University

Michael Wood — Associate Professor of Education, Harding University

Nathan Henton — Associate Professor of English, Harding University

Eddie Supratman — Instructor of History and Comparative Religion, ASU-Beebe, Beebe AR

Business Affairs Advisory Group

This group provides counsel regarding best practices and creative problem solving. The focus of counsel centers on documentation, developing partnerships, and addressing general entrepreneurial challenges. Special attention has been paid to developing the academic programs for the Associate of Science in Entrepreneurship and its future expansion to a baccalaureate program; and to long term financial stability.

Mark Farley — DBA Student, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston LA

Douglas Cloud — CPA (Ret.), Nashville TN

Doug Glenn — President, Searcy Industrial Products, Searcy AR

Jeff Spry — President, City Connections, Little Rock AR

Kenneth Olree — Director of Engineering (fmr.), Abilene Christian University, Abilene TX

Josiah Pleasant — Director of Center for Business as Mission, Harding University

Randy Hughes — Housing/Employment Specialist, City Connections

Keith Obiana — Program Manager, Microenterprise Program, Pepperdine University, Malibu CA

Rebecca A. Rice — Managing Partner and Founder, Rebecca Rice & Associates, Little Rock AR

Prison Affairs Advisory Group

This group provides counsel regarding the challenges involved with navigating the complexities of the prison environment. The focus of counsel centers on documentation, creating awareness, regulatory requirements, and logistics. Special attention has been paid to addressing the intellectual needs of inmates, tracking inmates using ADC tools, and encouraging successful reentry.

Wendy Kelley — Director, Arkansas Department of Correction (ADC), Pine Bluff AR

Rory Griffin — Deputy Director, ADC

Joshua Mayfield — Chaplaincy Services Director, (ADC)

David White — Warden, ADC Tucker Unit

Paul Fulks — Chaplain, ADC Tucker Max Unit

John Mark Wheeler — Deputy Warden, ADC Ester Unit

Joe Kelnhofer, Director, Riverside Vocational Technical School, ADC

Prison Inmate Context Advisory Group

This group provides counsel regarding the challenges inherent with incarceration. The focus of counsel centers on addressing emotional, spiritual, and intellectual needs in a way that respects the prison culture. Special attention has been paid to surfacing logistical challenges faced in their previous attempts at education while incarcerated and to improving the general disposition of the prison population toward the outside world. ADC Chaplaincy Services facilitates access to inmates as part of their classroom space coordination responsibilities.

Bobby Friend (inmate) — Chapel Clerk, ADC Tucker Unit

Darrell James (inmate) — Chapel Clerk, ADC Tucker Unit

Matthew Boivin (inmate) — Inmate Council Member, ADC Tucker Unit

James Smith (inmate) — Law Library Clerk, ADC Tucker Unit

Robert Orr (inmate) — Bus Factory Foreman, ADC Tucker Unit

Dale Lendrum (former inmate) — Teaching Associate, California State University, Long Beach CA

Prison Education Advisory Group

This group provides expert counsel regarding prison education. The focus of counsel centers on addressing common challenges inherent to providing learning opportunities for the incarcerated. Special attention has been paid to coordinating prison administrators and staff, instructional faculty, and incarcerated students.

Richard Goode — LIFE Program Coordinator, Lipscomb University, Nashville TN

Sean Pica — Executive Director, Hudson Link, Ossining NY

Aileen Baumgartner — Bedford Hills Program Director, Marymount Manhattan College, New York NY

Robert Hausrath — The Consortium Director, Daemen College, Amherst NY

Dale Irwin — President, New York Theological Seminary, New York NY

Ralph Orleck — Special Education Director/Principal, Department of Corrections, Cranston RI

Andrew Nurkin — Executive Director, Princeton AlumniCorps, Princeton NJ

Celia Chazelle — Department Chair and Professor of History, The College of New Jersey, Ewing NJ

The Point for the liberal arts teacher to keep in mind is that the trivium and quadrivium were established before the pragmatic advantages of those disciplines appeared, developed out of the natural desire of man to know, not because they were immediately practical.
~ Marion Montgomery

Hardship often prepares an ordinary person for an extraordinary destiny.

~ C.S. Lewis



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Associate of Arts in Humanities (A.A.H.)

The Associate of Arts in Humanities degree requires 62 semester hour credits. Students must earn all of these credits with the college. Students must complete the non-credit bearing training course and general mathematics review before applying for the 3 credit hour introductory course. 30 credit hours come from the Bloc Program, in which all students — regardless of semester — take the same courses, which the college offers once every 5 semesters. 25 credit hours come from the Lock-Step Program, which consists of 5 consecutive semesters of 5 credit hours each. A 4 credit hour capstone course completes the degree requirements.

A minimum of 40 General Education credits must be in the following disciplines: English Composition (10), Mathematics (3), Science (11), Fine Arts/Humanities (7), Social Science (9).

Program Objectives

The A.A.H. degree equips students to understand their place in the developed history of the Western world, empowers them for critical thought regarding unfamiliar opinions and ideas, and encourages a habit of intellectually rewarding textual intercourse and civil conversation. History shows that the intended knowledge, skills, and disposition transfer into situations requiring problem-solving and human interaction (e.g., interpersonal relationships, marketing, management, creative writing, etc.).

Required Courses

TR-1000: The Books of Luke

HUM-1310: Humanities Introduction

HUM-2490: Humanities Capstone Project

BLOC Program 

LOCKSTEP Program 

Associate of Science in Entrepreneurship (A.S.E.)

The Associate of Science in Entrepreneurship degree requires 72 semester hour credits. 58 of these hours come from the A.A.H. degree (described above). 14 hours come from additional courses focusing on business principles. Students may apply for admission to A.S.E. within 24 credit hours of completing the regular A.A.H. coursework.

Program Objectives

The A.S.E. degree equips students to navigate basic challenges associated with personal finances, for-profit, and nonprofit ventures in a free enterprise system. The program empowers students to think critically; and encourages the application of human understanding developed in the core A.A.H. program to opportunities that create value for the student’s community.

Required Courses

All courses required for the A.A.H. degree (except capstone) and:

Business Core



UNDERGRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BUS-2381: Business Principles 1 — Economics (3 credits)

A survey of general micro- and macroeconomic principles of scarcity and exchange. Students study the market mechanisms of supply and demand with regard to the quantities and prices of goods; factors of production and international trade; how quantities and prices are affected by government intervention; determinants of economic growth; financial institutions, short-run fluctuations in output and employment, inflation, macroeconomics of the open economy, and the role of government policy. Students also read and discuss contemporarily relevant case studies and great texts from the Western canon regarding the development of the subject. Offered during Summer semesters upon sufficient demand.

BUS-2382: Business Principles 2 — Accounting (3 credits)

A practical introduction to ethical financial record keeping and reporting. Students study the basic concepts and standards underlying financial accounting systems, including: revenue recognition; inventory; long-lived assets; present value; and long term liabilities; and a special emphasis on constructing and interpreting the income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement. Students also read and discuss contemporarily relevant case studies and great texts from the Western canon regarding the development of the subject. Offered during Summer semesters upon sufficient demand.

BUS-2383: Business Principles 3 — Finance (3 credits)

An introductory survey of the major components of financial systems in modern economies. This course introduces tools used in financial analysis, such as time value of money and discounted cash flow valuation, risk and return tradeoffs, pricing and valuation of debt and equity instruments, etc. Students also discuss recent applications of other disciplines to financial markets — such as behavioral finance — to integrate practical and ethical applications from the humanities and to equip them with the tools needed to make financial decisions with greater skill and confidence. Students also read and discuss great texts from the Western canon regarding the history and development of finance and consider case studies to apply learning. Offered during Summer semesters upon sufficient demand.

BUS-2290: Business Capstone Project (2 credits)

A formalization of the lessons learned regarding entrepreneurship. This course requires that students draft a formal business plan and to propose their startup to a panel of successful businesspeople. Students receive individualized guidance and feedback as they hone the goals, objectives, strategies, and tactics of their company. Must be completed within twelve calendar months of completing the other A.S.E. courses. Offered during Summer semesters upon sufficient demand.

COM-1220: Composition Coaching — Grammar (2 credits)

A writing intensive course that explores language-based communication. Students receive individualized instruction as they learn to avoid common grammatical errors. Various readings from Plato, Aristotle, Nicomachus and other ancient grammarians partner with later works from Aquinas, Hobbes, and Pascal, and others, to help students appreciate the role that grammar plays in autodidactic learning, communication, law, and philosophy. Specific activities may include crafting and exploring interpretive questions, drafting essays that imitate great authors, and practicing the art of revision. Offered to students in their first semester.

COM-1230: Composition Coaching — Grammar & Logic (2 credits)

A writing intensive course that investigates language-based communication. Students receive individualized instruction as they examine the relation of logic and grammar. Various readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Hobbes, Bacon, Descartes, Pascal, Locke, Berkeley, Rousseau, Kant, Lavoisier, Darwin, Einstein and possibly others help students appreciate the connection between thinking and structure. Specific activities may include crafting and exploring interpretive questions, drafting essays that imitate great authors, and practicing the art of revision. Offered to students in their second semester.

COM-2240: Composition Coaching — Logic (2 credits)

A writing intensive course that investigates language-based communication. Students receive individualized instruction as they learn to avoid common logical errors. Various readings from Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Augustine, Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Kant, Mill and possibly others help students appreciate the role that logic plays in autodidactic learning, communication, law, and philosophy. Specific activities may include crafting and exploring interpretive questions, drafting essays that imitate great authors, and practicing the art of revision. Offered to students in their third semester.

COM-2250: Composition Coaching — Logic & Rhetoric (2 credits)

A writing intensive course that investigates language-based communication. Students receive individualized instruction as they examine the relation of logic and rhetoric. Various readings from Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, Galen, Augustine, Hobbes, Bacon, Locke, Einstein and possibly others help students appreciate the connection between thinking and speaking. Specific activities may include crafting and exploring interpretive questions, drafting essays that imitate great authors, and practicing the art of revision. Offered to students in their fourth semester.

COM-2260: Composition Coaching — Rhetoric (2 credits)

A writing intensive course that investigates language-based communication. Students receive individualized instruction as they learn to avoid common rhetorical errors. Various readings from Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, Aurelius, Augustine, Chaucer, Calvin, Rabelais, Erasmus, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Milton, Boswell, Nietzsche, Huizinga, and others, help students appreciate the difference between rhetoric, dialectic, and sophistry. Specific activities may include crafting and exploring interpretive questions, drafting essays that imitate great authors, practicing the art of revision, and delivering oral presentations. Offered to students in their fifth semester.

HIS-1310: Pre-Revolutionary America (3 credits)

An investigation of historical influences during the Colonial Period. This course asks what factors birthed the United States of America. Primary texts from Plato, Aristotle, Plutarch and other ancient writers are compared and contrasted with those of English, French, and Colonial Enlightenment thinkers. Offered every five years starting from Sp 2018 and Fa 2020.

HIS-2210: The Constitution (2 credits)

An examination of the the idea and history of constitutional government. Of special interest is the US Constitution. Students examine primary sources including, but not necessarily limited to, works by Solon, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Plutarch, Tacitus, and English and American statesmen like Franklin, J. Adams, Hamilton, Jay, Madison, Jefferson and others to understand better the evolution of Western government. Offered every five years starting from Fa 2018 and Sp 2021.

HUM-1310: Humanities Introduction (3 credits)

An orientation to the tools and practices involved with classically humane learning. This course introduces students to some of the richest texts from the Great Books of the Western World to help them gain confidence in their ability to succeed with the interpretive process in a conversational learning setting. Students examine works by authors including, but not necessarily limited to, Plato, Aristotle, Plutarch, and Augustine. Offered during the Fall and Spring semesters upon sufficient demand.

HUM-2490: Humanities Capstone Project (4 credits)

A formalization of the tools and practices involved with classically humane learning. This course requires students to compose their own contribution to the Western Tradition. Students receive individualized guidance and feedback as they synthesize previous learning with the college to produce a self-disclosing, book length record of their experience with classically humane learning. Students also read and incorporate insights from authors including, but not necessarily limited to, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Locke, Swift, Gibbon, the Founding Fathers, Marx and Engels. Offered upon completion of the A.A.H. coursework as an independent study. Students may apply for enrollment in the course within 24 credit hours of completing the regular A.A.H. coursework. Must be completed within twelve calendar months of completing the regular A.A.H. coursework.

LIT-2201: Literature 1 — Homer to Shakespeare (2 credits)

A reading intensive course that explores ideas and themes found within the major literary works from the ancient world to the early modern period. Students begin by reading selections from those who defined Western literature — including but not limited to Homer, Dante, and Shakespeare. Due to the impact of each author on the written word, it will be important to read their respective works as a study in the metamorphosis of the Western canon. Offered every five years starting from Sp 2017 and Fa 2019.

LIT-2202: Literature 2 — Cervantes to Dostoevsky (2 credits)

A reading intensive course that explores ideas and themes found within the major literary works from the early modern period to the twentieth century. Students begin by reading selections from those who altered Western literature — including but not limited to Milton, Goethe, and Dostoevsky. Due to the impact of each author on the written word, it will be important to read their respective works as a study in the metamorphosis of the Western canon. Offered every five years starting from Sp 2019 and Fa 2021.

REL-1321: Religion and Theology 1 (3 credits)

An examination of religious thought in the Western world from the ancient civilization through the early-Enlightenment thinkers. Students read and discuss works by authors including, but necessarily not limited to, Aeschylus, Plato, Moses, Matthew, Augustine, Dante, and Hobbes. Due to the impact of each author on the development of religious understanding, it will be important to read their respective works as a study in the metamorphosis of Western religious thought. Offered every five years starting from Sp 2018 and Fa 2020.

SCI-1380: Science and Mathematics 1 (3 credits)

An introduction to scientific and quantitative thought. Students develop an understanding of experiment and measurement by investigating the records of historically significant scientists. Learning to think like a scientist, students read works by — but not necessarily limited to — Euclid, Archimedes, Nicomachus, Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Kepler. Course activities are structured to help the student to access the tools of science and mathematics so that they can synthesize and analyze emerging problems. Offered every five years starting from Fa 2017 and Sp 2020.

SCI-2100: Astronomy and Cosmology Lab (1 credit)

The laboratory projects parallel the corequisite course. Lab activities consist primarily of instructor prompted journal entries, which will include things like: reflecting on the scientific process; the agreement between hypotheses and experimental results; and decision-making based on those results. Hence, the lab projects pertain to the thinking process and religious assumptions of the examined authors. Corequisite SCI-2310.

SCI-2101: Biology, Psychology, and Medicine Lab (1 credit)

The laboratory projects parallel the corequisite course. Lab activities consist primarily of instructor prompted journal entries, which will include things like: reflecting on the scientific process; the agreement between hypotheses and experimental results; and decision-making based on those results. Hence, the lab projects pertain to the thinking process and religious assumptions of the examined authors. Corequisite SCI-2311.

SCI-2310: Astronomy and Cosmology (3 credits)

An examination of two of the most fundamental transitions in the tradition of astronomy and mathematics. Students study Ptolemy’s theory of the planets, and then consider Copernicus’ and Kepler’s revisions of the Ptolemaic account. Students reflect on order in the material universe as demonstrated by mathematical and scientific principles. Other authors examined include, but are necessarily not limited to, Galileo, Aristotle, Newton, Einstein, and others. Offered every five years starting from Sp 2019 and Fa 2021. Corequisite SCI-2100.

SCI-2311: Biology, Psychology, and Medicine 1 (3 credits)

An examination of professional accounts regarding the skills of scientific observation, experimentation, and record keeping. The course consists of physical, mental, and medical sequences; and the logical consequences of unhealthy behavior and other disease states. Students read works by, but necessarily not limited to, Hippocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Galen, Aquinas, Hobbes, and Locke. Offered every five years starting from Fa 2018 and Sp 2021. Corequisite SCI 2101.

SCI-2380: Science and Mathematics 2 (3 credits)

A continuation of SCI-1380. Students continue to develop an understanding of experiment and measurement by investigating the records of historically significant scientists. Learning to think like a scientist, students read works by — but not necessarily limited to — works by Galileo, Bacon, Pascal, Newton, Huygens, Lavoisier, and Einstein. Course activities are structured to help the student to access the tools of science and mathematics so that they can synthesize and analyze emerging problems. Offered every five years starting from Fa 2017 and Sp 2020. Prerequisite SCI-1380.

SEM-1001/1005: Seminar 1–5 (0 credits)

An orientation to the authors and works that students will read during the semester. Students gain an historical overview of BLOC Program texts with a special emphasis on common problems and insights that other scholars have wrestled with through the years. Additional instruction in effective note-taking, interpretive question crafting, personal organization, and self-governance rounds out the class period to benefit the attentive student. Offered every Fall and Spring semester as part of the A.A.H. BLOC Program.

SYN-2430: Great Ideas Study — Government (4 credits)

A survey of literature related to the historical idea of government. Students interact with some of the most influential Western authors on the subject and receive the opportunity to join the great conversation through individualized professional guidance. Offered every five years starting from Sp 2017 and Fa 2019.

SYN-2312: Great Ideas Study — Courage (3 credits)

A survey of literature related to the historical idea of courage. Students interact with some of the most influential Western authors on the subject and receive the opportunity to join the great conversation through individualized professional guidance. Offered to students in their fifth semester.

SYN-2318: Great Ideas Study — Duty (3 credits)

A survey of literature related to the historical idea of duty. Students interact with some of the most influential Western authors on the subject and receive the opportunity to join the great conversation through individualized professional guidance. Offered to students in their fourth semester.

SYN-2328: Great Ideas Study — God (3 credits)

A survey of literature related to the historical idea of God. Students interact with some of the most influential Western authors on the subject and receive the opportunity to join the great conversation through individualized professional guidance. Offered to students in their first semester.

SYN-2345: Great Ideas Study — Liberty (3 credits)

A survey of literature related to the historical idea of liberty. Students interact with some of the most influential Western authors on the subject and receive the opportunity to join the great conversation through individualized professional guidance. Offered to students in their third semester.

SYN-2349: Great Ideas Study — Man (3 credits)

A survey of literature related to the historical idea of man. Students interact with some of the most influential Western authors on the subject and receive the opportunity to join the great conversation through individualized professional guidance. Offered to students in their second semester.

SYN-2394: Great Ideas Study — Wealth (3 credits)

A survey of literature related to the historical idea of wealth. Students interact with some of the most influential Western authors on the subject and receive the opportunity to join the great conversation through individualized professional guidance. Offered during Summer semesters upon sufficient demand.

TR-1000: The Books of Luke (0 credits)

An introduction to the tools and practice of interpretive process within a conversational learning setting. Participants hone their academic reading skills, interpretive question generating ability, and interactive knowledge building capacity during weekly interactions with text and their peer learning community. Each session includes a short essay assignment both to formalize understanding and to enhance written communication skills through critical and constructive feedback. Offered throughout the year upon sufficient demand.

I want to do many good things for you’, the LORD says. ‘I want you to become rich and strong, and I do not want to hurt you. I want you to believe that you will have a good future life. Then you will ask for my help. And you will come and you will pray to me. And I will listen to you. You will look for me. And you will find me when you really want to find me.’ ‘You will find me’, says the LORD. ‘And I will bring you back from the foreign countries where you were slaves. I will bring you back from all the countries and from among the people that I sent you to’, he says. ‘I will bring you back from the places that I sent you away to.’

~ Jeremiah 29:11–14



And do your work well. You will soon leave the earth. Then it will not be possible for you to work. You will not think about future events. You will not know anything.

~ Ecclesiastes 9:10

Whatever things you do, do them for the Lord. Do them as well as you can for him. Do not work only for people.

~ Colossians 3:23

With a few words, I can describe everything that you must know. You should worship God. He says to you what you should do. And you should do what he says. That is our duty. We may do good things. Sometimes we do wrong things. We think that nobody sees us. But God sees the things that we do. And he will ask us to explain the answer to this question: ‘What have we done with our lives here on the earth?’

~  Ecclesiastes 13:13–14

Likewise College: 2016/17 Academic Catalog: page -of-