Student Guidebook

Psychology Department

Haverford College

April 2014 revision

Table of Contents

1. About the Department

2. Information for First Year Students (and other students new to the department)

3. Information for Majors (and Prospective Majors)

4. Information for Minors (and Prospective Minors)

5. Information about Courses

6. Senior Thesis

7. Sample Plans for Completing the Psychology Major

8. Student Worksheet for Tracking Progress in the Major

9. Departmental Policies and Procedures

10. Links and Other Resources

11. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Note: Linked elements within this document are in BLUE; external links are in RED.


1. About the Department

1.1. Departmental Philosophy and Orientation

Psychology applies the methods of the social and natural sciences to the problems of mind, brain, and behavior that have fascinated thinkers for eons. Some of the deepest puzzles (“How does the brain produce behavior? What is the nature of human memory? How do cultural environments and genes produce normal and abnormal behavior?”) are now yielding to systematic scientific investigation.

The psychology program at Haverford is designed to help students understand the evolutionary, physiological, cognitive, cultural, social, and intrapersonal processes underlying behavior and experience. It further aims to integrate this understanding with opportunities to engage in research projects that span a wide range of approaches to scientific psychology.

We emphasize research and the scientific approach to psychology because we feel that a liberal arts education and informed participation in the real world require a critical understanding of how scientific methods can (and cannot) be applied to human behavior. Our faculty members are active researchers as well as teachers who can offer students collaborative research opportunities.

1.2  Faculty and Staff

Marilyn Boltz, Professor. Ph.D., Ohio State University. Memory and cognition; Time and behavior; psychology of music; cross-modal perception; social cognition; psycholinguistics

Rebecca Compton, Professor. Ph.D., University of Chicago. Cognitive neuroscience, psychophysiology, neuropsychology of emotion and attention.

Seth Gillihan, Visiting Assistant Professor. Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. Clinical psychology, neuroscience approaches to psychopathology.

Mary Ellen Kelly, Visiting Assistant Professor. Ph.D., Carleton University. Neuroscience, CNS injury and epilepsy, epileptogenesis.

Elizabeth Gordon, Visiting Assistant Professor. Ph.D., Temple University. Clinical psychology, anxiety disorders, evolutionary psychology.

Nicholas Jones, Laboratory Instructor and Research Coordinator. M.S., Villanova University. Cognition, visual attention.

Benjamin Le, Department Chair and Associate Professor. Ph.D., Purdue University. Close relationships, commitment processes, social networks, relationships and emotion; applied social psychology.

Jennifer Lilgendahl, Associate Professor. Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. Personality, self-identity and narrative life history.

Sarah Shuwairi, Visiting Assistant Professor. Ph.D., New York University. Infant and child development, object recognition, infants’ visual perception.

Thomas Wadden, Visiting Professor. Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Health psychology, obesity, eating disorders, public health, clinical psychology

Shu-wen Wang, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles. Clinical psychology, cross-cultural psychology, stress and coping, social support, Asian-American mental health. [on leave Fall semester 2014]


2. Information for First Year Students

(and other students new to the department)

Beginning Your Study of Psychology

For the vast majority of students, the first step in studying psychology at Haverford is to enroll in Psychology 100, Foundations of Psychology. We typically offer two or three sections of the course each Fall and Spring (for a total of four to six each year). This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology and serves as the prerequisite for more advanced courses in the major. A parallel course at Bryn Mawr (PSYC 105) can also be taken to substitute for the Haverford Foundations course. Students with AP Psychology credit from high school (and a score of 4 or 5 on the AP exam) have the option to waive the Foundations course and enroll in upper-level courses; this should be done only after consultation with a faculty member in the Psychology Department. See more about AP classes here.

Because Foundations is designed as an introductory course with first-year students in mind, we reserve the majority of seats in the course for first year students. To ensure access to students who have a strong motivation to take the course in the first year, we prioritize the spring semester slots to first year students who attempted unsuccessfully to enroll in the course in the fall. Students who did not try to enroll in the course in the fall or those who got in but chose not to enroll in the fall will be entered into a lottery for the remaining slots.

Preparing to Major in Psychology

First year

We recommend that students interested in majoring in Psychology take PSYC 100 (Foundations of Psychology) during their first year at Haverford. It does not matter if Foundations is taken in the Fall or Spring semester of the first year; as long as it is taken that year, students will be on-track for the major.

Note that while it is preferable to take Foundations during the first year, it is still possible to become a psychology major if you begin your course of study in the sophomore year. However, in that case, we strongly recommend that you consult with a psychology faculty advisor to plan carefully and ensure that you’ll be prepared for declaring the major.

Thinking Ahead to Your Sophomore Year

After taking Foundations in the first year, it is recommended that prospective majors take Experimental Methods and Statistics (PSYC 200 at Haverford or PSYC 205 at Bryn Mawr) during the sophomore year. This course is offered once a year at Haverford, and in the alternate semester at Bryn Mawr. Along with Stats/Methods, students should consider registering for one or two other 200-level Psychology courses during the sophomore year, although we know that sometimes it can be difficult to get into Psychology courses as a sophomore (because limited enrollment priorities usually favor juniors and seniors).

Thinking Further Ahead: Are You Planning to Go Abroad as a Junior?

For students planning to go abroad in the junior year, taking Stats/Methods (PSYC 200 at Haverford or PSYC 205 at Bryn Mawr) during the sophomore year is strongly recommended; it can be difficult to take Stats/Methods, go abroad, and begin laboratory work all as a junior. Please consult with your academic advisor or the department chair if you are considering taking Stats/Methods and going abroad as a junior.

Click here for more information about planning for being a major.



3.  Information for Majors (and Prospective Majors)

The psychology major is one of the most popular majors at Haverford. In the past few years, between 30 and 40 students have graduated each year with a psychology major. Bryn Mawr students are able to major in psychology at Haverford, assuming they complete the coursework listed below.

3.1. Summary of the Major

___________________________

Total = 11 credits

3.2. Specific Requirements of the Psychology major

The psychology major consists of 11 credits that fall into two categories: courses that fulfill our (a) breadth requirement and (b) research requirement. According to college policy, a student must earn a 2.0 or above in a course in order for it to count towards the major.

3.2.1. Breadth Requirement

Because psychology is a broad discipline, the major requires exposure to the variety of perspectives that comprise modern psychological inquiry. At the introductory level, students take the Foundations of Psychology course (PSYC 100), which introduces all of the perspectives represented in the department. In addition, students take six advanced courses, at least one from each of the following three areas: biological, cognitive, and social/personality.

Other notes about the breadth requirement:

3.2.2. Research Requirement

The goals of the research requirement are to train students to think critically and analytically about psychological questions, to understand the scientific method as applied to the discipline, and to understand the specific methods and techniques used by psychological researchers to address particular questions about behavior. Thus, majors obtain hands-on training in conducting original research in Psychology with the following coursework:

Stats/Methods (PSYC 200) is typically a prerequisite for 300-level lab courses (see here for a table showing lab courses). The corresponding 200-level lecture course is typically taken concurrently with, or before, its 300-level lab (with the exception of the PSYC 360, Cognitive Neuroscience lab, which is a stand-alone course and can be taken independently of the PSYC 260 lecture; see this table for notes on the pairing of lecture and lab courses).

Typically Stats/Methods and the half-credit laboratory courses are not taken outside of Haverford/Bryn Mawr.

See more about the senior thesis experience on the Psychology Department website (external link).

3.3. How to declare the Psychology major

Each spring, sophomores receive the relevant dates and procedures for declaring a major from the college. Typically the department hosts an informational meeting at the end of March or the beginning of April, prior to the major declaration period, to meet prospective majors and answer questions about the department. Major declaration corresponds with spring pre-registration, typically around the third week in April. We expect prospective psychology majors to follow the deadlines and procedures mandated by the college regarding signing up for the major.

3.4. Double-Majoring

It is possible for students to double-major with Psychology and another major. Please consult with your faculty advisor and/or the chair of the Psychology Department if you intend to double major. Note that the psychology major requires a senior thesis project (see more about senior thesis here), so double-majors will typically do two separate thesis projects (one for Psychology, one for the other major).


4. Information for Minors (and Prospective Minors)

The psychology department offers a minor; in the recent past, between 10 and 15 students per year have graduated with a psychology minor.

4.1. Summary of the Minor

___________________________

Total = 6 credits

4.2. Requirements of the Psychology Minor

The psychology minor consists of 6 credits. Students must earn a 2.0 or above for a course to count towards the minor.

4.3. Declaring the Psychology Minor


5. Information about Courses

This is not intended as a replacement for the official Haverford College Course Catalog (external link), but rather as a guide that lists courses that are taught regularly, or have been taught recently in the department, along with information about how these courses fulfill departmental requirements.

5.1. Foundations of Psychology (PSYC 100)

Typically 2-3 sections of Foundations are offered each semester.

5.2. Experimental Methods and Statistics (PSYC 200)

Experimental Methods and Statistics is offered once a year at Haverford and in the alternate semester at Bryn Mawr, so it is available in the Bi-Co each semester.

It is recommended that students take this course at Haverford (PSYC 200) or Bryn Mawr (PSYC 205). Ideally, this course is taken during the sophomore year and no later than fall semester of the junior year, although students planning on going abroad as a junior should take it during their sophomore year.

5.3. Haverford Courses at the 200- and 300-level (and their associated breadth area; read more about the breadth requirement here). Labs are listed separately below.

Regularly Offered Courses

Course Name (and Number)

Typically offered1

Breadth area2

Memory and Cognition

PSYC 213

Approximately every other year

C

Introduction to Personality Psychology

PSYC 215

Most years

SP

Biological Psychology

PSYC 217

Every year

B

The Psychology of Time

PSYC 220

Approximately every other year

C

Social Psychology

PSYC 224

Most years

SP

Psychology of Language

PSYC 238

Most years

C

Cultural Psychology

PSYC 242

Most years

SP

Cognitive Neuroscience

PSYC 260

Every year

B or C3

Theory and Research in Dyadic Processes

PSYC 325

Most years

SP

Self and Identity

PSYC 335

Most years

SP

1This is a rough schedule of when these courses are typically offered, although scheduling in future years can vary depending on changing in staffing patterns and other faculty responsibilities.

2B = Biological, C = Cognitive, SP = Social/Personality

3For courses fulfilling multiple breadth areas, students must pick which area it will count for; double-counting is not permitted.


Courses Taught by Visiting Faculty (and Other Past Classes)

Course Name (and Number)

Most recently offered1

Breadth area2

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 209

2014-15

elective4

Developmental Psychology

PSYC 210

2013-14

elective4

Social Cognition

PSYC 212

2009-10

C or SP3

Primate Origins of Society

PSYC 221

2011-12

B or SP3

Evolutionary Psychology

PSYC 222

2014-15

B or SP3

Psychology of Human Sexuality

PSYC 223

2014-15

elective4

Health Psychology

PSYC 245

2015-15

elective4

Sensation and Perception

PSYC 255

2013-14

B or C3

Applied Social Psychology

PSYC 280

2014-15

SP

Neurobiology of Disease

PSYC 318

2014-15

B

Perspectives in Critical Psychology

PSYC 326

2011-12

elective4

Supersized Nation: Understanding and Managing America's Obesity Epidemic

PSYC 327

2014-15

elective4

Body and Space

PSYC 336

2011-12

B or C3

Anxiety Disorders and Their Treatment

PSYC 349

2014-15

elective4

Neuroscience of Mental Illness

PSYC 370

2010-11

B

1This is a listing of courses offered by visiting faculty in the last five years, or courses taught by other faculty that we do not have immediate plans to teach again. This list may change with new people joining our department in future years, and is intended for reference only and not for future planning.

2B = Biological, C = Cognitive, SP = Social/Personality

3For courses fulfilling multiple breadth areas, students must pick which area it will count for; double-counting is not permitted.

4Elective classes count towards the six 200- or 300-level courses that are required for the major (see here for more details), but do not count towards fulfilling a breadth area.


5.4. A Sample of Psychology Courses at Bryn Mawr College

This is a sampling of classes our students have taken in the past. If you have a question regarding a specific course not listed below, please ask the chair of the Haverford department. The list does not include the Bryn Mawr introductory (PSYC 105) or stats/methods (PSYC 205) courses, although these can substitute for the corresponding Haverford courses, or the 100-level “focus” classes (which do not count towards the Haverford Psychology major).1 We do not have information about when (or if) these courses will be offered in the future.

Course Name (and Number)

Corresponding HC Course2

Breadth area3

Educational Psychology

PSYC 203

none

elective4

Developmental Psychology

PSYC 206

Developmental Psychology

PSYC 210

elective4

Social Psychology

PSYC 208

Social Psychology

PSYC 224

SP

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 209

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 209

elective4

Human Cognition

PSYC 212

Memory and Cognition

PSYC 213

C

Applied Behavior Analysis

PSYC 214

none

elective4

Behavioral Neuroscience

PSYC 218

Biological Psychology

PSYC 217

B

Cross-Cultural Psychology

PSYC 224

Cultural Psychology

PSYC 242

SP

Evolution of Human Nature

PSYC 240

Evolutionary Psychology

PSYC 222

B or SP

Autism Spectrum Disorders

PSYC 250

none

elective4

Judgment and Decision Making

PSYC 325

none

C

Pediatric Psychology

PSYC 346

none

elective4

Psychopharmacology

PSYC 395

none

B

1The half-credit 100-level “focus” courses at BMC (e.g., Psychology of Terrorism, Genocide, and Negotiations, respectively) do NOT count towards the Psychology Major at Haverford.

2Students may get credit for either the Haverford or Bryn Mawr course, but not both (e.g., you cannot get credit for both Human Cognition at Bryn Mawr and Memory and Cognition at Haverford).

3B = Biological, C = Cognitive, SP = Social/Personality; for courses fulfilling multiple breadth areas, students must pick which area it will count for; double-counting is not permitted.

4Elective classes count towards the six 200- or 300-level courses that are required for the major (see here for more details), but do not count towards fulfilling a breadth area.

5.5. Courses fulfilling the laboratory requirement

Below is a list of laboratory courses that count towards the two laboratory courses that are required to complete the Psychology major (see more about the research requirement here and laboratory courses here).

Usually labs and lectures share the last two digits of their respective course numbers (e.g., 224 for the Social Psychology lecture and 324 for the corresponding laboratory).

Lab Name (and Number)

Notes/Prerequisites

Laboratory in Memory and Cognition

PSYC 313

Past or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 213 (Memory & Cognition) or PSYC 220 (Psychology of Time) and completion of PSYC 200 (Stats/Methods) is required.

Laboratory in Personality Psychology

PSYC 315 

Past or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 215 (Personality Psychology) is required. Completion of PSYC 200 (Stats/Methods) is strongly recommended; however, concurrent enrollment with PSYC 200 may be permissible with instructor’s approval.

Laboratory in the Psychology of Time

PSYC 320

Past or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 213 (Memory & Cognition) or PSYC 220 (Psychology of Time) and completion of PSYC 200 (Stats/Methods) is required.

Laboratory in Social Psychology

PSYC 324

Past or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 224 (Social Psychology), and completion of PSYC 200 (Stats/Methods) is required.

Laboratory in Cultural Psychology

PSYC 342

Past or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 242 (Cultural Psychology), and completion of PSYC 200 (Stats/Methods) is required.

Laboratory in Cognitive Neuroscience

PSYC 360

This lab is free-standing from the PSYC 260 lecture; you do not need to take the 260 lecture (in the past, concurrently, or ever) to take this lab. Completion of PSYC 200 (Stats/Methods) is strongly recommended; however, concurrent enrollment with PSYC 200 may be permissible with instructor’s approval.

Laboratory in Developmental Psychology

PSYC 310

This lab was offered by a visiting professor in 2010-11, and is included in this list for archival purposes. We do not currently have plans to offer this lab in the immediate future.

Laboratory in Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 309

Past or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 209 (Abnormal Psychology) or Introduction to Personality Psychology (PSYC 215) is required. Completion of PSYC 200 (Stats/Methods) is strongly recommended; however, concurrent enrollment with PSYC 200 may be permissible with instructor’s approval.

Laboratory in Sensation and Perception

PSYC 355

Past or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 255 (Sensation and Perception). Completion of PSYC 200 (Stats/Methods) is strongly recommended; however, concurrent enrollment with PSYC 200 may be permissible with instructor’s approval.

Please note that Bryn Mawr will be offering lab courses in the future, and their lab courses may begin serve  toward our laboratory requirement. Until there is a policy in place, please direct questions to the chair of the Haverford Psychology Department. Also, note that the corresponding Bryn Mawr lecture courses, when available, can be taken concurrently (if offered) or serve as prerequisites for labs.


6. Senior Thesis

A senior thesis is required of all Psychology majors. There are two formats for the thesis project: a two-semester thesis or a one-semester thesis. Much more detail about the thesis project is available on the Psychology Department website (external link), but in summary:


7. Sample Plans for Completing the Psychology Major

Please note that the below prototypes are just samples and are not meant to be inflexible or prescriptive. Instead, they highlight the key parameters to consider for progressing smoothly through the major, with the following in mind:

Here’s a decision-making chart and sample plans for completing the major (see below for a description of each of these plans).

Plan 1

Plan 2

Plan 3

Plan 4

Taking labs as senior

Occasionally students take one of their lab courses during their senior year. Although it is not ideal, it may be unavoidable due to study abroad or other circumstances. This scenario is not described above; please discuss it with your advisor if you think it might make sense for you.


8. Student Worksheet for Tracking Progress in the Major

Students can use this worksheet to track progress towards the psychology major.

Completed?

Course Name

When?

(e.g., Fall 2012)

______

Foundations of Psychology (PSYC 100) or additional upper-level course if AP credit was granted):1 _______________

___________

_______

Experimental Methods & Statistics (PSYC 200; or BMC 205)

___________

_______

Biological course: _________________________________

___________

_______

Cognitive course: _________________________________

___________

_______

Social/Personality course: __________________________

___________

_______

Other 200- or 300-level course: _____________________

___________

_______

Other 200- or 300-level course: _____________________

___________

_______

Other 200- or 300-level course: _____________________

___________

_______

Lab associated with an above course:2 _______________

___________

_______

Lab associated with an above course: _______________

___________

_______

First semester of senior thesis

___________

_______

Second semester of thesis or additional 200-/300-level class:3 _____________________________

___________

 

Additional Psychology courses taken (beyond the above requirements):4

_____________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________

 

___________

 

___________

 

___________

 

___________

1See here for more information on using AP credit in lieu of Foundations.

2See this table for more information about pairing lectures and labs.

3Read more about senior thesis here.

4Read more here (external link to Haverford College course catalog; “at least 19 course credits must be taken outside of a student's major field of study”).


9. Departmental Policies and Procedures

9.1. Entry to the major

9.2. Earning Major or Minor credit for a course

9.3. Laboratory courses

9.4. Advanced Placement (AP) Credit

9.5. Study Abroad Courses

Up to two credits of Psychology courses taken during study aboard may count towards the major or minor. To get major/minor credit for coures taken abroad, follow the following procedures:

a. Contact the department chair prior to going abroad, providing her/him with as much information about the course as possible, including (a) a syllabus and (b) description of assignments (syllabi/assignments from previous sections of the course are okay).

b. The chair, in consultation with other faculty, will evaluate and approve the course for major/minor credit if appropriate. The general rule of thumb is that courses meeting for roughly the same amount of time as a Haverford course (~45 hours) and having exams and/or assignments will be approved, although the specific content and orientation of the course will also be considered.

c. Keep all of your notes and work following the completion of the course, should the department chair need to verify the content of the course.

d. If course materials are not available beforehand, we will consider courses retroactively. Upon returning from study abroad, students can provide course materials (i.e., a syllabus, completed assignments/exams, readings) to the department chair, who will consult with other faculty about the appropriateness of giving credit for the course. However, it is important to get courses pre-approved when possible, and a retroactive approval should only be considered as a last resort.

In summary, please get courses pre-approved before leaving for study abroad. We cannot guarantee that courses presented retroactively will be approved.

Here is a list of classes that we have approved for major credit in the past (note: this list is very much in progress and will expanded slowly over time):

For the study abroad courses listed above B= fulfills departments’ biological requirement; C= cognitive, SP= social/personality.


9.6. Courses taken at other institutions

To request major/minor credit for courses take at institutions other than Haverford, Bryn Mawr, or Swarthmore, please follow the procedures outlined above for study abroad courses.

Typically no more than two courses in total (i.e., including study abroad) can be taken at institutions other than Bryn Mawr or Swarthmore for major/minor credit, although exceptions can be made at the discretion of the department chair (e.g., in the case of transfer students etc.).

It is highly unusual for students to take classes at institutions other than Bryn Mawr in lieu of PSY 200 (Stats/Methods) or our half-credit laboratory courses. Please consult with the department chair.


10. Links and Other Resources

10.1 Graduate school workshop

The department typically hosts a workshop to discuss graduate school in psychology, usually in mid/late-spring. Please ask the department chair about this workshop if it has not been announced.

10.2 Psychology-related jobs email list

Periodically the faculty in the Psych Dept receive announcements for psych-related jobs and research opportunities. In the past we have forwarded these announcements to all seniors in the department, but that wasn't ideal because (a) some students might not want to receive the postings and (b) some might want to receive the postings after they've graduated.

To streamline the process we have created a list that you can subscribe to if you want to receive these announcements. Once you subscribe, you'll receive the postings until you unsubscribe. Typically this is only about ~10 announcements a year (mostly in the spring semester), so there's not much traffic that clogs up your inbox. If you want to receive the postings, follow the instructions here:

http://lists.haverford.edu/mailman/listinfo/hcpsych-jobs

It is recommended that you use your non-HC email address if you anticipate wanting to receive postings even after you graduate.

10.3 Departmental Website

There is a list of links and resources (e.g., APA style, grad school rankings, professional organizations, etc.) on the Psychology Department website (external link).

10.4 Neuroscience minor

Many students choose to major in Psychology and minor in Neuroscience. Learn more about Neuroscience at Haverford here (external link to the Haverford website).

10.5 Haverford Psychology Facebook page

If you want to stay in touch with the Haverford Psychology Department on Facebook, click here (external link).


11. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q: Can I skip Foundations because I have AP credit?

A: Yes, if you have a score of 4 or 5 on the Psychology AP exam, you can skip our Foundations courses (see here for more information, including why you would want to do this, and why you might not). If you end up majoring in Psychology, you need to take one additional upper-level course so that you have the same number of credits towards the major (or minor) as everyone else. AP Psychology credit can allow you to skip Foundations, but it does not count as a major credit.

Q: What is the breadth requirement, and how do I know what area a course counts for towards the breadth requirement?

A: To fulfill the breadth requirement you must take at least one course in each of three areas: biological, cognitive, and social/personality. See here for a list of courses, including information on how each addresses the breadth requirement. Courses taught by visiting faculty may fit one of these areas; ask if you’re not sure.

Q: Do Bryn Mawr psychology courses count towards the Haverford major/minor?

A: Yes. Please see here for information on which area (biological, cognitive, social/personality, or elective) BMC courses count towards. Generally speaking, BMC courses with direct parallels at Haverford (e.g., BMC’s Social Psychology course) count for their respective area, however some BMC courses (e.g., Developmental Psychology) do not fit one of these areas but do count overall towards the major. The only exceptions are the 100-level “Focus” courses intended for non-majors (e.g., Psych of Genocide/Psych of Terrorism) which do not count towards the major. Bryn Mawr’s introductory course (PSYC 101/102/105) can substitute for Haverford’s Foundations course.

Q: What about Swarthmore or UPenn classes?

A: Typically classes from Swarthmore will count towards the major/minor, but you should consult with your advisor to confirm that particular courses satisfy major/minor requirements. Similarly, consult with your advisor if you plan on taking a course at UPenn.

Q: I’m thinking about going abroad. Is there anything I should plan for?

If you plan on going abroad it is important to take PSYC 200 (Stats/Research methods; or Bryn Mawr’s PSYC 205) during your sophomore year. Then during the semester of your junior year when you are on campus, take one or both of your labs. Taking Stats/Methods during your junior year and going abroad for part of that year is discouraged. See here for more information on planning your classes as a psychology major.

Q: Does it matter if I take Experimental Methods and Statistics at Haverford versus Bryn Mawr?

No, it does not matter. They are equivalent courses and both will prepare you for your future work as a Psychology major.

Q: Can I get major credit for courses taken abroad?

A: In many cases, yes. However, you need to get official approval from the department chair, who may consult with other members of the department. The chair will expect to see a syllabus from the course you are planning to take, to ensure that it covers psychology material and doesn’t overlap too much with what you’ve already taken, and to make a decision about what area of the major it could count towards. If the course is not in English, you must provide a translation of the syllabus. Sometimes only a half-credit of major credit is awarded if the study abroad program has a shorter term or if the class does not seem to meet as often or involve roughly equivalent work to a full-credit Haverford course. We strongly recommend that you seek approval from the chair before taking the abroad course, though in some cases retroactive credit may be awarded. We typically do not award more than 2 credits towards the major from semester-long study abroad programs. See more here.

Q: Can I get major credit for a summer course at another institution?


A: In many cases, yes. We handle this in the same way that we handle study abroad courses (see above). See more here.

Q: Do I get to choose my faculty advisor, or will that person be assigned to me?

A: We attempt to balance two factors: the need to spread advising duties evenly across all faculty members and the desirability of matching students with advisors with whom they feel comfortable. Please note that faculty members do not serve as advisors when they are on sabbatical. Therefore, every summer we do some juggling of advisees, shifting advisees away from someone who is about to go on sabbatical and over to someone who is returning from sabbatical. If you know whom you would like to have as your advisor, you should sign up with that person and we will try to keep you matched with that person. If you do not have a preference, sign up with anyone in the department and simply tell that person that you do not have a preference, in which case you may be shifted during the summertime reassignment.

Q: Is my major advisor the same person as my thesis advisor?


A: No, not necessarily; they are different roles. Your thesis advisor is not determined until the beginning of the senior year, and that decision is not affected by who the major advisor is.