Information Guide for Volunteers in Serbia

Welcome! Thank you for considering volunteering your time in Serbia.

We hope this info pack will be helpful in giving you an overview of the situation in Serbia, the different organisations working here and how to prepare for your time volunteering. So volunteers on the ground can plan for your arrival and match you up with a project according to volunteer needs/your skills/the field you want to work in, please send a quick email with your arrival & leaving date as well as info on any relevant skills you may have to the volunteer coordinators for Serbia at refugeevolunteering@indigovolunteers.com. We will try and get back to you as soon as possible!

The information below is provided for and by volunteers working across Serbia. Please help us with keeping it up-to-date! If you have any info to share, please do so by adding a comment.

If you need any additional info after reading this doc, please post your question to People to People Solidarity on Facebook or send us an email.

The safeguarding of refugees is paramount, so please understand that, in order to ensure the safety of refugees and not to endanger the work of volunteers, we do not publish any sensitive information to this document. If you think you should know more specific details, just send us an email.

For easy reading, select Tools > Document Outline and skip to the sections most relevant to you.


What’s in this document?

Should I Come? How Can I Help?        3

The Situation in Serbia        3

Volunteering FAQs & Info        5

Key Tips for New Volunteers        9

Know the Area: Camps & Orgs in Serbia        11

Belgrade        11

Belgrade City Centre: ‘The Barracks’        11

Obrenovac        12

Krnjača        12

Subotica        13

Subotica Area        13

Kelebija        13

Horgoš        14

Sombor        14

Šid        14

Šid Area        15

Dimitrovgrad        15

Pirot        15

Preševo        15

Bujanovac        16

Tutin        16

Divljana        16

Principovac        16

Bogovađa        16

Adaševci        17

Sjenica        17

Kikinda        17

Bosilegrad        17

Banja        17

Emergency Numbers & Contacts        18

Useful Links        18

Should I Come? How Can I Help?

The short answer is: yes! With the Hungarian and Croatian border now firmly closed a growing number of refugees is trapped in Serbia; UNHCR expects the refugee population in the country to have more than doubled by the end of the summer. Grassroots response to the crisis is still in it’s early stages - meaning there’s a real need for volunteers and resources. There’s a lot of different projects to get involved with and always a need for a spare pair of hands helping to chop vegetables, serve tea, teach English, keep the camps clean, sort and distribute clothing, build, disseminate info or organise workshops and activities for the kids. Especially if you’re familiar with working in the context of the refugee crisis, or you’re are a trained doctor/nurse/psychologist/counselor/social worker - Serbia needs you!

Please bare in mind that it takes a few days to get stuck in/find your feet with volunteering though - ideally you should be able to commit to at least a week’s work. If you are planning on flying to Serbia for a weekend of volunteering or paying massive amounts of money for your trip, please consider donating the money to a local group or organisation instead.

So we can prepare for your arrival, pop the Serbia volunteer coordinators an email on refugeevolunteering@indigovolunteers.com. Make sure to mention your arrival and (approximate) leaving date as well as any skills you have that might be useful (whether that’s teaching, training in social work or counselling, carpentry, engineering, design-y or artistic skills, experience of working with kids or other vulnerable groups, being a particularly good organiser or communicator, etc etc).

The Situation in Serbia

According to UNHCR there are currently around 7500 refugees in Serbia, at least 40% of which are minors. Around 85% of them are sheltered in official government facilities while the rest are sleeping rough in the capital city of Belgrade and unofficial encampments close to the borders with Hungary and Croatia. Most want to continue their journeys to the European North - however with both the Hungarian and the Croatian borders now being nearly impossible to cross, most people end up staying in Serbia for months. The majority of refugees residing in Serbia are from Afghanistan (85%) and Pakistan, as well as Syria and Iraq.

Volunteers expect the largest unofficial ‘camp’ in the country - the ‘Barracks’ in the centre of Belgrade - to be evicted very soon to make room for a large construction project along the river. It is unclear where residents will be expected to move - but there is a chance they will be forcibly relocated to camps across the country. Serbia’s official camps generally require registration and fingerprinting, though authorities have begun opening a number of ‘open’ camps that allow residents to come & go and do not require any papers. Conditions across camps vary widely. Information on the situation in Serbia’s ‘closed’ camps are limited; UNHCR is generally the only organisation granted access. Various Human Rights organisations including MSF & Amnesty International report of illegal push backs/deportations from Presevo camp on Serbia’s Southern border with Macedonia.

The Serbian state offers little protection for refugees - in 2016 only 48 individuals were granted asylum or subsidiary protection.

For detailed information on the Serbian asylum procedure, detention and international protection, check out this comprehensive country report for Serbia published by AIDA (Asylum Information Database).

Volunteering FAQs & Info

Do I need a visa?

Serbia grants visa-free entry for 90 days in a 180-day period to passport holders from 74 countries, including all EU citizens. Have a look on Wikipedia to see if your country is included. Once your 90 day visa is expired, a simple border run is often all that’s needed for a fresh stamp in your passport - the 90/180 day rule doesn’t seem to be enforced.

You will need a valid passport or European Identity Card to cross into Serbia. To avoid trouble, don’t  mention your intentions of volunteering to Serbian border officials. Claim you’re in the country for a holiday instead.

IMPORTANT: Tourists are legally required to be registered with local police at all times. If you are staying at a hostel/hotel this should be done for you: ask for a ‘white card’ when checking in! If you are staying in private accommodation you will have to either register at a police station or ask your landlord to do it for you. Some hostel/hotel owners and landlords will try and avoid registering you to save themselves paying city taxes for your stay - nonetheless make sure to carry both your ‘white card’ and ID with you at all times, local police may stop and ask you to present them.

Money Matters...

The currency used in Serbia is the Serbian Dinar (RSD). See here for current exchange rates, one Euro equals about 123 RSD.

Shops often accept payment in Euro - but don’t rely on this being the case, it is technically illegal for businesses to do so. Exchange bureaus are all over the place, look out for signs saying ‘Menjačnica’.

Visa and Mastercard are accepted almost everywhere. Card payment is accepted in most hostels, hotels, car rental services and - in Belgrade at least - often also in restaurants and bars.

It’s important that you realise that you absolutely must be able to pay your own expenses while volunteering in Serbia. Almost all volunteers here are entirely self-funded and there is virtually no free volunteer accommodation. Luckily Serbia is a relatively cheap place to travel/live/volunteer! A basic budget for Belgrade would be around 25€/day, less for the rest of the country. This would cover a hostel bed or apartment share (5-10€), street food/home cooking, local transport and a few beers. It’s possible to live off less - and depending on your individual choices also to spend considerably more.

Should I bring donations, or cash to buy items?

Serbia has strict laws and regulations around imports, making it tricky to bring donations into the country. Taxes charged at the borders are often so high that it sometimes makes more sense to instead purchase cheap items once you’re in the country.

Technically, the procedure for getting second clothes into the country is as follows:

You will need a sender and receiver organisation with matching paperwork on both ends. Áll items need to have been cleaned by a professional cleaning company and signed off as such. All items must be inventoried by item type and number, and boxed and clearly labelled according to the contents (1 box of trousers, measured by number and also by weight, to be on the safe side). New goods do not require cleaning but do require the same paperwork and packaging procedure.

Once your items are up for inspection at customs, you will need to pay import taxes. Your items will then be held there until claimed by the receiver organisation. If you simply turn up at the border you can (and most probably will) be denied entry, as you are lacking the proper import paperwork.

In practice you can often claim that the items in your car are personal and therefore shouldn’t be taxed, but prepare to be kept waiting at the border. The reason the procedure is so strict is because Serbia isn’t an EU member, and so goods not ‘officially’ proven to be for humanitarian aid will be treated as commercial imports that have a heavy leavy due to Serbia’s unfavourable trade agreements with the EU.

In general it’s best to bring cash donations for trusted warehouses (see BelgrAid or Refugee Aid Serbia) or organisations which can buy goods locally. They best know the needs on the ground - and buying items locally also benefits the Serbian economy.

Before You Go

Get travel insurance (and make sure it covers volunteer work)! Yes, even if you’re an EU citizen. Your EHIC (European Health Insurance Card) only entitles you to minimal coverage in Serbia. Most volunteer groups and organisations expect you to be personally liable for any accidents that might happen to you while volunteering so make sure you’re insured.

Get your phone unlocked! If you bought your phone on a contract it’s probably locked to your home network provider. Make sure to request it being unlocked (which should be free once your contract is up) before leaving so you’ll be able to use your phone with a Serbian SIM.

Join People to People Solidarity - Serbia and/or Information Point for Belgrade Volunteers on Facebook for updates.

Download WhatsApp to your phone! You’ll find that a lot of coordination happens via Whatsapp groups. To be added to the main coordination group for Belgrade, ‘Belgrade’s Station Colec’, send an email to refugeevolunteering@indigovolunteers.com.

Getting to Serbia

Rome2Rio is a really helpful tool to compare your travel options. The main airport is Belgrade Nikola Tesla Airport (BEG), but it’s worth also checking for flights to Niš (INI). Wizzair offers crazy cheap deals from all over Europe to the Balkans region, Ryanair does bargain flights from Italy, Spain and Germany to Niš.

Getting Around

Renting a car in Serbia is relatively cheap & easy (it can cost as little as 100€/week) - and may be handy to have if you are volunteering camps in remote areas. Standard European driver’s licenses are accepted. Keep in mind that you might have to pay for parking in bigger cities (the cheapest place to park your car in central Belgrade, ironically, is the barracks). Be careful when giving refugee friends a ride - under Serbian law this can be framed as an act of trafficking!

Bus services across Serbia are extensive, though sporadic connections may leave you in the lurch for a few hours. Reservations are only worthwhile for international buses or if you’re travelling on a public holiday. Tickets can be bought from the station before departure or on board. Trains aren’t as regular or reliable, but cheap and often scenic.

If you’re looking for, or can offer, a lift head over to the Serbia Volunteer Accommodation/Ride Sharing Facebook group.

The easiest way to get around Belgrade is using local busses, though the city centre is pretty compact and distances are often walkable. Tickets for inner-city trips bought on the bus cost 150RSD (~1,20€) but drivers often also waive you through if they don’t have the correct change. It pays off to get a ‘BusPlus’ tap card from one of the red ‘Moj-Kiosk’: they cost an initial 200RSD but bring the price of a single trip down to 89RSD (~0.70€). Make sure to ask for the receipt when you get your ‘PlusBus’ card topped up - some kiosk owners will try and pocket the cash. See here for a full list of bus routes.

Where to stay?

Accommodation in Serbia is cheap, with hostels usually costing less than 10€/night. There are lots of affordable AirBnBs and it is also relatively easy to find temporary apartment rentals. If you are interested in sharing accommodation with other volunteers, check out the Serbia Volunteer Accommodation/Ride Sharing Facebook group.

Where do I …

 … meet other volunteers in Belgrade?

Kafe Suri, in Belgrade’s main train station, is a popular volunteer hang-out. All Belgrade volunteer groups meet for a general coordination meeting here at 7pm on Mondays.

There are bi-weekly meetings for new volunteers to ask questions and be briefed on the situation in Belgrade - pop us an email for information on where & when to find the next one.

 … buy a Serbian SIM?

Because Serbia is not an EU-country phone calls on European SIM-cards are expensive. It pays off to buy a Serbian SIM, and makes coordination with other volunteers so much easier! Serbian SIMs are cheap (setting you back only about 300SRD/~2.50€) and can be bought at any of the red ‘Moj-Kiosk’. The two biggest network providers are MTS and VIP, both offer a number of different data-minutes-texts deals.

What should I pack?

When volunteering, it is always good to start with a pair of heavy duty/ hiking boots. Please pack comfortable clothing and try to bear in mind how culturally sensitive your clothing is. We recommend choosing items of clothing that cover your chest, shoulders and knees. The seasons are quite extreme, so ensure you have checked out what the temperatures will be before your trip, and pack appropriately (eg, sun hat & cream, or woolly hat & thermal layers!) It’s always a good idea to bring a light rain jacket (even in the summer), as you never know when you may be caught out!

What does an average day of volunteering in Serbia look like?

Obviously everybody’s volunteering experience differs depending on many different factors. If you have a specific skill such as social care or construction experience, please let us know, it’s very likely you will put your skills to great use whilst here!

For the majority of volunteers daily activity revolves around a series of different jobs such as cleaning the Barracks, helping out with food distributions, supporting residents of the Barracks to access money that their family has sent them by accompanying them to make a Western Union transaction, and sorting clothes in the warehouse.

PLEASE NOTE: We have received word that short-term volunteers have given their name for Western Union transactions. Please understand you are under no obligation to ever give your name for this service, but if you do, you have a responsibility to be present in order for the residents to receive the money somebody has sent them. Please consider this very carefully, as there have been cases of volunteers leaving and not notifying the people they are helping, resulting in money being lost.

If you are planning on being here long-term and you have an idea for a project- brilliant! The community of volunteers here are very supportive. It would be a good idea to present your project idea to the coordinators operating here, so as to ensure that you are not duplicating work. Also, you can request for help with your project by getting in touch with the volunteer coordinators, who can send extra pairs of hands your way!

Is it safe?

When working in a crisis there is always a certain amount of risk. Badly organised distributions can be a catalyst for trouble, which puts both residents and volunteers at risk. We ask you to work closely with the network of experienced volunteers and NGOs to try and prevent any tensions from rising. Collaborating with your peers and coordinators gives you the opportunity to familiarise yourself with the best practices, and tried and tested methods. If the group or organisation you are working with has a code of conduct, house rules, or any general guidance then please note these are usually created for the safety of yourself and others, and by not abiding by them you may increase your risk of harm.

Do Serbs speak English?

In Belgrade and other big cities English is spoken widely. Serbs are often happy to practice their English on you. In smaller towns and rural areas communication may prove a little more complicated, try to speak slowly and use only basic language. Knowing a few basic words in Serbian can open doors; have a look at some simple phrases here. Due to historic/economic ties a surprising number of people across the Balkans also speak some German.

Key Tips for New Volunteers

Whatever your reason for choosing to volunteer, there is no denying that it is a great opportunity to work on some amazing projects and alongside some incredible individuals. You will have the chance to make an impact on other people's’ lives - we collectively have a responsibility to ensure that the impact we make is positive.

If you are volunteering in this crisis for the first time, check out these links to give you a little insight on what to expect and some little tips to see you through your first few days: [1], [2], [3]

A few key things to remember:

  • Stay calm. This is a humanitarian crisis - and when you first arrive you will likely feel overwhelmed by the numbers of people and the amount of need. Nonetheless it’s important to remain calm: refugees are already under extreme stress, if you are also panicking and/or being aggressive this only worsens the situation for them. Please do not yell or otherwise contribute to tension.
  • Take your time, and make sure to always put everything back in its place when you have a free minute. It makes everyone’s job easier when you keep things tidy.
  • If there's downtime or you're not sure what to do, pick up some trash. Plastic bottles, emergency blankets, discarded clothes - it is all piling up every day and can look overwhelming, but if everyone chips in a little, our workplace will be in much better shape.
  • Please respect what other people are working on. If you need their help, ask--but don't be upset or judgmental if they don't or can't help. Sometimes people are working on something that doesn't look immediately urgent, or as important as what you're doing, but in the big picture, it might very well be.
  • Prioritize refugees. It seems obvious, but sometimes personality conflicts can seem more important.
  • Respect the police. Volunteers have built a good relationship and trust with the police in and around camps, and this relationship is absolutely essential to maintain in order to continue our work.
  • If you are working in a group, always inform other people when you leave. Situations can sometimes be intense or chaotic, and whoever you're working with is relying on your help too.
  • Ask permission for photos. Photos can be key for communicating the situation to friends back home (especially if they're donating money!), but please be sensitive to refugees' immediate needs and privacy. If people are actively fleeing persecution, it can endanger them to share their image and location. If you get permission and take a photo you like, it's nice to share it with the person, and get their name if they want to give it. Photos should always be a secondary concern, not a primary one.
  • Have a look at the document about crowd control.

One of the most crucial things to remember is to take good care of yourself. This may seem obvious, however volunteering in challenging conditions can be exhausting on both the body and mind. In order to leave that positive impact we were talking about and to properly serve others, you must first take care of your own needs.

You can read a very comprehensive article about self-care here.  Some things to remember are:

  • There is no shame in self-care!  Taking the time to look after yourself will ultimately make your work more effective and your trip will be more fulfilling. So enjoy your days off (at least one day a week!) and explore the city or the local area without feeling any guilt!
  • Look out for your friends and colleagues. It can be hard to identify or to admit to yourself if you are burnt out, exhausted, stressed or overwhelmed. But if a friend or someone you work with is showing any symptoms of burn-out then let them know. Which also means that you need to listen to the advice of your friends if they suggest you need a day-off or a little break!
  • Don’t forget about home. Family and friends at home are your support network. Whilst they may not understand the situation here as well as you do, it is always good to check in with them and let them know what you’re up to. They may be that ‘impartial’ voice you needed to hear. Plus, it will stop them worrying about you too..!
  • Cover the basics. Eat healthy meals, drink plenty of water, exercise, take a hot shower and ensure you have time to reflect. It all goes without saying, but doing these basic things to look after your body and mind will make you feel instantly better, and can be overlooked!
  • If you aren’t coping well, then let someone know. There is no denying that working in refugee camps can be an intense experience. You may hear of traumatic stories or witness people living in inhumane conditions. Everybody has their own way of dealing with this, but sometimes it can be very overwhelming and you may find yourself struggling to cope. This is not weakness and it’s not something you have to face alone. A problem shared is a problem halved. There are people there to help!

Know the Area: Camps & Orgs in Serbia

17883642_10210801989064012_1404686953295387211_n.jpg

Map of camps across Serbia. Rigardu is working to compile an interactive map with all locations relevant to our work (camps, registration offices, etc.). If you have any GPS-based location data, please send an email to information@rigardu.de.

Belgrade

For an updated overview of organisations and services provided for refugees and migrants in Belgrade, see goo.gl/T0wmAH.

Belgrade City Centre: ‘The Barracks’

Number of refugees:

1000-1100

Type:

Unofficial

Last update:

09.04.2017

Around a thousand refugees live in squalid conditions in abandoned warehouses just behind Belgrade’s central train station. Another couple hundred live in an abandoned multi-storey car park.

With daily new arrivals and refugees leaving for other camps or to attempt to cross borders numbers vary significantly.

Organisations & grassroots groups working on the ground include:

  • Miksalište, a community & support centre run by a number of organisations including Mikser House, Save the Children, Médecins du Monde and Médecins Sans Frontiers. Miksalište offers a place for refugees to wash & shower, charge their phones and do laundry, as well as pediatric medical help, psychological support and workshops/language classes for children & adults. Minors are able to stay overnight, with social workers on-call 24/7. There is a security guard on the door at all times.

        Gavrila Principa 15, Beograd

  • Info Park focuses on information dissemination/collection and communication facilitation, as well as assisting with the registration of those who want to claim asylum in Serbia. Info Park also offers English & German classes to both women and men as well as other workshops at their office space.

        Gavrila Principa 55, Beograd

        Across the street from Miksalište, Gavrila Principa

  • BelgrAid runs the biggest distribution warehouse in Serbia the Belgrade suburb of Železnik. It will soon be serving 2000 hot meals to refugees both in the Barracks and Obrenovac camp as well as large NFI distributions.
  • No Name Kitchen operates a kitchen in the Barracks, cooking more than 600 hot meals a day.
  • Hot Food Idomeni currently serves a hot lunch to over a thousand people in the barracks and Obrenovac camp - the group plans to be moving on to a new project soon, with BelgrAid taking over.
  • Refugee Aid Serbia (RAS) runs a warehouse and regularly distributes non-food items in the Barracks.
  • The Get Sh*t Done Team are a construction team, who run a workshop based at the BelgrAid warehouse. They have been focussing on the installation and maintenance of WASH facilities at the Barracks.
  • CRPC provides advocacy and legal advice.

Obrenovac

Number of refugees:

1083

Type:

Reception Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

Located an hour’s drive from central Belgrade. Obrenovac is a government-run open camp, meaning residents are free to come & go and aren’t fingerprinted. Busses connect camp residents to the city.

Volunteers aren’t usually allowed to enter the camp, except to provide essential food services. Hot Food Idomeni provides a hot lunch to residents in the ‘cafeteria’.

Krnjača

Number of refugees:

1009

Type:

Asylum Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

Government-run open camp, 20 minutes from central Belgrade by train. Asylum services available. Volunteers/smaller NGOs are usually not allowed to enter.

What large NGOs are in charge?

Subotica

Number of refugees:

135

Type:

Transit Camp

Last update:

09.04.2017

Camp on the Serbia-Hungary border run by the Commissariat for Refugees and Migration, Arbeiter-Samariter Bund Deutschland e.V., German Federal Foreign Office and German Humanitarian Assistance. Other NGOs require permission from the Commissariat to enter. Residents sleep in Red Cross tents and containers.

Subotica Area

Number of refugees:

100-120

Type:

Unofficial

Last update:

09.04.2017

Around 100 people are sleeping rough in abandoned buildings and tents in and around Subotica town. The refugee population here used to be a lot bigger - but with Hungary’s borders now firmly closed most former residents have moved on to the Šid area along the Croatian border. Serbian authorities are keen to shut down all informal settlements in Subotica; in March 2017 around 140 refugees were forcibly moved to Presevo camp on the Serbia-Macedonia border by police forces.

  • Fresh Response runs daily food & NFI distributions. Still in operation?
  • Rigardu distributes drinking water and provides showers as well as mobile charging stations for phones.
  • Aid Delivery Mission runs daily hot food distributions.

Kelebija

Number of refugees:

14

Type:

Transit Zone

Last update:

09.04.2017

Just outside Subotica. The informal transit camp that used to exist here was evicted and demolished by Serbian police in January 2017.

Around a dozen registered refugees stay in a building in the ‘transit zone’, less than 10 sleep rough in surrounding forests. This number used to be much higher - Serbian police has been rounding up and moving people, most likely to Presevo camp on the Serbian border with Macedonia.

  • NorthStar is no longer present. Police forcibly shut down their community centre in January 2017.
  • Fresh Response distributed food & NFI tri-weekly until early February 2017. Still provide aid upon SMS request.
  • Refugees receive daily food parcels from the Red Cross.

Horgoš

Number of refugees:

3

Type:

Transit Zone

Last update:

09.04.2017

  • Sirius Help, Hungarian group providing support twice-weekly.

Sombor

Number of refugees:

125

Type:

Transit Camp

Last update:

09.04.2017

Close to Hungarian & Croatian border. Information needed!

Šid

Number of refugees:

578

Type:

Transit Camp

Last update:

09.04.2017

In Croatian border town. Information needed!

  • SOS Children's Villages operates here.
Šid Area

Number of refugees:

~40-60

Type:

Informal Shelters

Last update:

09.04.2017

Mainly Algerians & Moroccans, smaller numbers of Pakistanis & Afghans. Residents sleep in an abandoned hangar next to the government reception centre. Information needed!

  • Soulwelders provides hot showers on their brand new shower truck several times a week.

Dimitrovgrad

Number of refugees:

76

Type:

Transit/Reception Camp

Last update:

09.04.2017

On the Bulgarian border. Information needed!

Pirot

Number of refugees:

2052

Type:

Transit/Reception Camp

Last update:

09.04.2017

South-Eastern Serbia, close to the Bulgarian border. Information needed!

Preševo

Number of refugees:

772

Type:

Reception Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

REMAR SOS, UNHCR, Save the Children, Red Cross Serbia, and other large international organisations operate here. Preševo is a closed camp with a capacity for about 1000 refugees. It is well equipped, offering showers, heating, medical care as well as activities for children. The majority of the camp’s residents are families.

Refugees caught illegally crossing into Croatia or Hungary and ‘pushed back’ into Serbia are often taken to Preševon by Serbian police. Many refugees manage to ‘escape’ the closed camp, often paying smugglers between 300-500€ to get back to Belgrade.

UNHCR & Amnesty International have reported illegal deportations from Preševo to Macedonia.

Gaining access to the camp isn’t easy - contact BorderFree for advice. InterEuropean Human Aid Association used to work here.

Bujanovac

Number of refugees:

202

Type:

Reception Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

Southern Serbia, close to Kosovan/Macedonian border. Information needed!

Tutin

Number of refugees:

88

Type:

Temporary Asylum Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

Close to the Montenegrin/Kosovan border. Information needed!

Divljana

Number of refugees:

242

Type:

Reception Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

South-Eastern Serbia. Information needed!

Principovac

Number of refugees:

308

Type:

Transit Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

Information needed!

  • SOS Children's Villages works here.

Bogovađa

Number of refugees:

210

Type:

Asylum Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

Western-Central Serbia. Information needed!

Adaševci

Number of refugees:

1008

Type:

Transit Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

On the Croatian border. Information needed!

  • SOS Children's Villages
  • Czech team  has a long term mission with volunteers and coordinator, laundry service, basic library, free-time activities with children/adults, distribution of hygiene items and other NFI.

Sjenica

Number of refugees:

349

Type:

Temporary Asylum Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

South-Western Serbia, close to Montenegrin border. Information needed!

Kikinda

Number of refugees:

Not Yet Open

Type:

Last update:

26.02.2017

North-Eastern Serbia, on the Romanian border. Information needed!

Bosilegrad

Number of refugees:

47

Type:

Reception Centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

Southern Serbia, on the Bulgarian border. Information needed!

Banja

Number of refugees:

109

Type:

asylum centre

Last update:

09.04.2017

South-Eastern Serbia, close to Bosnian/Montenegrin border. Information needed!

Emergency Numbers & Contacts

Take a moment to program these into your phone. The country code for Serbia is +381.

  • Police: +381 192
  • Fire: +381 193
  • Ambulance: +381 194
  • To report a case of human trafficking, call the ASTRA (Anti Trafficking Action) SOS Hotline on +381 11 785 0000 or email sos@astra.rs.
  • If you have spoken to a vulnerable minor who wants to claim asylum in Serbia, contact the Belgrade Centre for Social Work on +381 2650 329. The centre has social workers on call 24/7. 

Useful Links

  • Check out Are You Syrious’ Daily Newsletter, a Croatian NGO that provides up-to-date info on the situation along the Balkans route for both refugees and volunteers.
  • News That Moves, another really fantastic news sharing platform.
  • UNHCR publishes monthly briefings on the situation in Serbia, which you can find here. UNHCR‘s Weekly Report on Europe also includes a section on Serbia.