Southern Wayne High School

Home of the “Saints

Wayne County Public Schools

School Improvement Plan

School Improvement Plan

2014 through 2016

Dr. John F. Boldt

124 Walter Fulcher Road

Dudley, NC 28333

District Improvement Plan

Goals and Vision

State Board of Education Goals:

Goal 1 – North Carolina public schools will produce globally competitive students.

Goal 2 – North Carolina public schools will be led by 21st Century professionals.

Goal 3 – North Carolina Public School students will be healthy and responsible.

Goal 4 – Leadership will guide innovation in North Carolina public schools.

Goal 5 – North Carolina public schools will be governed and supported by 21st Century systems.

District Goals for Wayne County Public Schools (960)

District Goal 1 –Wayne County Public Schools will produce globally competitive students.

District Goal 2 – Wayne County Public Schools will be led by 21st Century professionals.

District Goal 3 –Wayne County Public Schools students will be healthy and responsible.

District Goal 4 –Leadership will guide innovation in Wayne County Public Schools.

District Goal 5 – Wayne County Public Schools will be governed and supported by 21st Century systems.

Goals for Southern Wayne High School (380)

School Priority Goal 1:     Southern Wayne High School survey results will show a 10%

                                                   improvement in student, staff, and parent perception that we provide

                                                   a safe orderly environment which promotes healthy,

                                                   responsible students

School Priority Goal 2:    100% of Southern Wayne High School’s teachers will work towards

                                                   analyzing and utilizing data to inform and instruct students

School Priority Goal 3:    100% of Southern Wayne High School’s teachers will implement

                                                  personalized professional development activities focused on

                                                  the use of SchoolNet.

School Priority Goal 4 – Southern Wayne High School will exceed growth and increase

                                                  performance grade of students scoring proficient in Math I, English II,

                                                  Biology, all NC Final Exams, and all CTE exams

School Priority Goal 5 – Southern Wayne High School will increase student and parent

                                                 involvement to promote a safe and positive school culture as measured

                                                 through AdvancED surveys, membership in extra-curricular activities,

                                                 and Positive Behavior Support data from Hero

District Mission Statement for Wayne County Public Schools (960)

Mission: Wayne County Public Schools holds high expectations for all students by collaborating with parents and the community to provide individualized support.

Mission Statement for Southern Wayne High School (380)

Mission: The mission of Southern Wayne High School, in partnership with students, faculty, parents, and the community, is to use rigor, relevance, and relationships to enable all students to become successful graduates who are globally competitive in the 21st century.

District Vision and Beliefs Statement for Wayne County Public Schools (960)

Vision:

Cultivation, Personalization, Innovation, Every Student, Every Day!

Beliefs:

* The education of children is a priority and is the responsibility of the entire community.

* Education is a sound investment for society and a key to ending the cycle of poverty.

* Understanding and respecting cultural diversity enriches the learning environment.

* All students deserve a quality education.

* Learning is a lifelong process.

Vision and Beliefs Statement for Southern Wayne High School(380)

Vision:

To provide an exemplary education for all students in a globally competitive 21st century environment.  

Beliefs:

The faculty and administration at Southern Wayne High School believe that each student is a unique individual with special intellectual and physical abilities, as well as special emotional needs and cultural interests which must be fostered to the fullest potential.  We work together to meet the needs of each student while maintaining a sense of fairness, democracy, and individuality.  Experiences here guide students toward positive interactions with peers, family, faculty, and community.  Also, we maintain open communication and a good working relationship with the community, as we value their support and concern in our attempts to enhance our program.

Cover Sheet – Wayne County Public Schools

LEA or Charter Name/Number:

Wayne County Public Schools - 960

School Name/Number:

Southern Wayne High School - 380

School Address:

124 Walter Fulcher Road, Dudley, NC 28333

Plan Year(s):

2014-2016

School Improvement Team Membership

Committee Position

Name

Principal

John Boldt

Assistant Principal

Angela Grantham

Assistant Principal

Ryan Nelson

Teacher Representative

Sandra Purvis

Teacher Representative

Stephen Sullivan

Teacher Representative

Parker King

Teacher Representative

Rebecca Hill

Teacher Representative

Alyssa Ramsey

Teacher Representative

Ashley Cashwell

Teacher Representative

Shelly Proctor

Technology Facilitator

Ronda Robinson

Media Coordinator

Karen Garris

Data Manager

Sue Dixon

CDC

Pam King

Athletic Director

David Lee

Parent Representative

Dr. Dennis Atwood

Guidance Representative

Andrea Britt

Percentage of Staff Approval:

100 %

Principal Signature:

9/25/2014

Local Board Approval Date:

Date

Executive Summary – Southern Wayne High School

Southern Wayne High School is a place where change is met with positive attitudes and a willingness to adapt. This is evident when looking at how our staff is currently implementing Common Core and Essential Standards, Power School, Hero, and the new state accountability model.  

Synopsis of School Demographics

Southern Wayne has a total student population of approximately 1118 students.  This is six student less than the year before.  The number of students would actually be 1127 this year but 9 students had their alternative school placement deferred from last year to this year.  There are 126 total staff members of which 81 are certified teachers and 35 are school support staff.  Although the demographic makeup of the school is similar to the previous year, the school’s non English speaking population is increasing.  The school now has almost 40 ESL students.

Student Performance Data

Last year the school improved in all measured areas except for Work Keys which went down about 3%.  This year the results were more mixed.  The school increased in Biology (increased 1.2 %), ACT proficiency (increased 3.1 %), Work Keys (increased 3%), and graduation rate (increased 3.8%). The school did not meet its growth goals and achieved 67.1% of its Annual Measurable Objectives which is a 2.9% increase from last year.  The school had a 3.1% decrease in its EOC composite from 2014 to 2015.  Last year it had a 4.6 % improvement.  In the last two years the school’s ACT score improved 7.2 %.  In the same period the schools had an increase in graduation rate in Wayne County of 8.9%.  From 2013 to 2015, the school’s 4 year graduation rate increased from 70.6 to 79.5.

Student Demographic Data

Southern Wayne has a total student population of approximately 1118 students. There are 58 more male than female students.  31.4% of the student body identify as being Caucasian while 35.6% of the population identifies as African American.  28.6% of the student population is Hispanic and 4.0% of the population identifies as Multi-racial. Of the remaining student body .5% is Asian.  72.3% of students receive free or reduced lunch.  This is up by 1.6% over last year

Community Demographic Data

Southern Wayne High School is located in southern Wayne County just north of Mt. Olive in Dudley, North Carolina. Southern Wayne has a feeder pattern comprised of two Elementary Schools (Carver, Brogden Primary), two Middle Schools (Brogden Middle, Mount Olive Middle), and one K-8 school (Grantham). Southern Wayne's student body is comprised of students and families from three distinct communities (Mount Olive, Brogden, Grantham). Each community is a rural community as Wayne County has a primarily agricultural economy.  Wayne County has approximately 123,697 inhabitants.  About half of the population is male and half the population is female.  Around 59% of the Wayne County population is Caucasian, 32% is African American, and all other races including Hispanic make up 9% of the population.  50% of Wayne County residents make $49,999 per year or less.  

School Characteristics

Southern Wayne High School was built in 1965 as the second school in Wayne County to consolidate several smaller community High Schools. Those schools were; Grantham High School, Brogden High School, Mount Olive High School, and Seven Springs High School. Southern Wayne's first graduating class crossed the stage in May of 1966.  At present, Southern Wayne is comprised of four grade levels with a student population of over 1,118. There are over 126 professionals on staff (30.3% of staff are Southern Wayne graduates) with course offerings ranging from Agriculture to Marketing as well as a strong foundation in the core instructional area. The school has several after school and club activities to offer to its students. There are 28 athletic teams that eligible students may try-out for. The school’s campus is very large and covers over 50 acres. There are seven wings to the school building including a second floor (200 wing). Southern Wayne has a very large gym facility, two weight rooms, several athletic fields, two green houses, two computer labs, science laboratories, Business labs, a well-equipped Media Center, four Vocational labs, and a band room. The school operates fourteen buses and has two Assistant Principals and One Principal.  Southern Wayne is a traditional public high school that serves grades 9-12.  SWHS serves a diverse population of students in a rural community.  The staff and students at SWHS run on a modified block schedule.  

Stakeholders Perspective on the Quality of Education

All staff members feel ownership in Southern Wayne High School. Wayne County's School Improvement process fosters this feeling of ownership. The staff has been enabled to take a close look at Southern Wayne High School within the system. Members of the staff were involved in brainstorming, evaluating, and making suggestions for improvement, several focus areas came to the forefront. The staff has spent countless hours focused on student achievement, parent and community involvement, staff participation, and retaining quality teachers. While these goals are not uncommon for schools across the country, we have narrowed our focus to our particular population and their needs. Each and every member of Southern Wayne High School's team is proud of the school and the goals that we accomplish together.

Data Summary Analysis – Your School Name

What does the analysis tell you about your school’s strengths?  Consider data sources such as state testing data, annual measurable objectives, student growth data, stakeholder survey data, discipline, attendance, etc. (Add Charts and Graphs)

For 2015, SWHS saw mixed results with its accountability results.  However, the overall trend over the last three years has been a positive trend line in most assessed areas.

Southern Wayne saw a decrease in EOC composite from 2014-to 2015.

Southern Wayne was the only traditional high school in Wayne County to have an increase in all three EOC’s from 2013 to 2014.  Only Biology increased from 2014 to 2015

Math I saw a 2.8 % increase from 2013 to 2014 and a 5.9% decrease from 2014 to 2015

English II saw a 9.4 % increase from 2013 to 2014 and a 5.5% decrease from 2014 to 2015

Biology saw a 2.6 % increase from 2013 to 2014 and a 1.2 % increase from 2014 to 2015

SWHS scores increased for Male, Hispanic. Multi and AG.  Scores dropped for

All, female, and black

Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO’s) increased from 2013 to 2015

Since 2009/10, SWHS has had a teacher turnover rate that is lower than WCPS and North Carolina.

SWHS’s percent proficient improved 7.2 % from 2013 to 2015

SWHS saw improvement in most subgroups except Black students which has declined three years in a row

SWHS’s graduation rate has increased 12.9% in last 7 years

SWHS’s graduation rate increase for all subgroups from 2013 to 2015 except for Hispanic.  The school saw a dramatic increase in Male, White, EDS, LEP and SWD graduation rate

Number of Drop outs from 2006 to 2015.  Trend line is trending down

 

Reasons for students dropping out of school @ SWHS

Traditionally SWHS has some of the lowest rates of crime and violence rates per 1000 students of any school in the county.

Over the last 7 years SWHS has had the lowest average number of incidents reportable to DPI in Wayne County.

SWHS has seen a dramatic reduction in short term suspension since 2008.  Since 2012 the school has had fewer short term suspensions that the WCPS average

NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey Questions

SWHS   2010

SWHS 2012

SWHS 2014

 NC High School 2014

NC      2014

The faculty & staff have a shared vision

82.7

90.7

88.3

80.4

84.2

There is atmosphere of trust and mutual respect in the school

82.7

81.3

73.3

73.0

73.1

School administrators support teachers efforts to maintain discipline

70.7

77.5

65.6

80.3

81.9

The faculty are recognized for their accomplishments

80.8

94.7

93.4

84.7

85.0

School leadership makes effort to address concerns about Leadership

76.1

83.3

87.3

78.3

81.4

School leadership makes effort to address concerns about Teacher Leadership

81.9

88.2

89.1

83.5

86.4

School leadership makes effort to address concerns about Managing student conduct

64.9

78.3

65.5

76.9

80.0

School leadership makes effort to address concerns about Instructional Practices

80.6

89.9

87.5

86.4

88.1

School leadership makes effort to address concerns about New Teacher Support

80.8

88.2

89.1

82.2

83.8

Teachers receive feedback that help improve instruction

84.9

86.3

89.7

82.3

85.4

Teachers are held to high professional standards for delivering instruction.

96.1

89.5

91.8

91.6

93.8

Teacher performance is assessed objectively.

86.3

90.3

86.7

83.9

86.4

The procedures for teacher evaluation are consistent.

78.3

86.3

89.8

80.7

84.0

Teachers feel comfortable raising issues and concerns that are important

78.4

85.3

80.3

72.9

72.1

The faculty has an effective process for making group decisions to solve problems

69.9

79.7

83.3

73.8

77.4

Teachers are effective leaders in this school

86.5

93.4

85.0

85.0

87.5

Teachers have appropriate level of influence on decision making in this school

62.7

69.0

70.7

66.2

69.8

Teachers are recognized as educational experts

79.7

81.6

88.3

80.2

82.0

Teachers are trusted to make professional decisions about instruction

83.8

85.5

91.8

82.8

82.0

Teachers are encouraged to try new things to improve instruction

94.7

97.2

98.3

93.5

92.9

Teachers have autonomy to make decisions about instructional delivery

87.1

92.9

94.9

84.9

79.9

Teachers are encouraged to participate in school leadership roles

90.5

90.5

95.1

90.9

92.3

The Faculty work in a school environment that is safe

82.4

83.3

83.3

90.7

93.2

Overall, my school is a good place to work and learn

87.0

84.2

91.5

84.9

85.1

 

 

 

 

= or > than NC High School or NC State average

 

= or > than NC High School or NC State average

 

and = or > than highest rating ever for SWHS

According to the North Carolina Working Conditions Survey

NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey Questions - Weaknesses

SWHS   2010

SWHS 2012

SWHS 2014

 NC High School 2014

NC      2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teachers are allowed to focus on educating students with minimal interruptions

36.5

60.8

63.3

65.1

67.2

Teachers have sufficient access to appropriate instructional materials

71.1

68.9

59.0

71.0

73.6

Efforst are made to minimize the amount of routine paperwork teachers are required

35.1

56.3

68.3

61.3

57.2

Teachers have sufficient access to instructional technology

55.3

60.0

47.5

76.5

78.7

The school environment is clean and well maintained

64.9

69.3

41.7

84.5

86.0

Reliability & speed of internet connections in this school are sufficient

88.3

59.2

34.4

70.9

76.1

Parents/guardians support teachers, contributing to their success with students

53.9

52.7

60.7

70.6

72.5

Students at this school understand expectations for their conduct

73.0

72.6

68.9

79.1

85.1

Students at this school follow rules of conduct

24.3

34.2

41.0

64.3

71.9

School administrators consistently enforce rules of student conduct

54.7

62.5

44.3

66.0

72.2

School administrators support teacher's efforts to maintain discipline in classroom

70.7

77.5

65.6

80.3

81.9

Professional development is evaluated and results are communicated to teachers

60.6

68.7

63.8

60.8

64.5

School leadership makes effort to address concerns about Managing student conduct

64.9

78.3

65.5

76.9

80.0

TOP 10 STRENGTHS OF SOUTHERN

WAYNE HIGH SCHOOL

 

According to the Effective Schools Parent Survey

Top ten strengths of SWHS

 

  1. Learning is seen as the most important reason for attending school. 
  2. Teachers hold consistently high expectations for students. 
  3. Teachers treat students fairly, consistently, and with respect. 
  4. All extracurricular activities are available to all students without discrimination on the basis of sex, national origin, race, or handicapping condition. 
  5. The principal effectively runs meetings which have a clear agenda and where discussion is limited to relevant topics. 
  6. Standards for achievement are set so that they are challenging, attainable, and consistently maintained. 
  7. When educational issues arise, student learning considerations are the most Important criteria used in decision making. 
  8. The principal provides support to teachers on student discipline. 
  9. Achievement expectations are communicated to all students. 
  10. Students are treated in ways which emphasize success and potential rather than focusing on failures and shortcomings.

According to the Effective Schools Student Survey

Top ten strengths of SWHS

1. My teachers expect me to do well on tests

2. Teachers really believe I can achieve academically

3. I am expected to get my homework done on time

4. The grades I receive are based on how well I perform in a subject

5. The administration /principal of this school listens to students and their concerns

6. My parents know and support what’s going on in my school

7. Teachers offer time before or after class to give additional help to students

8. School rules are enforced equally and fairly

9. The school focuses in helping students learn

10. My homework helps me do better in class

What does the analysis tell you about your school’s gaps or opportunities for improvement?  Consider data sources such as state testing data, annual measurable objectives, student growth data, stakeholder survey data, discipline, attendance, etc. (Add Charts and Graphs)

The school continues to focus on continuous improvement.  The school improved in a number of key areas such as Work Keys, ACT, and graduation rate.  The school still needs to improve in the 3 EOCs.  Scores in Math I and English II went dawn while those in Biology went up.  The school still is behind the county average in all three tests. The school did not however meet its growth goal and was graded as a D.  This is a major concern as the school is identified as low performing.

According to the NCTWCS, teacher’s feeling of support and influence from parents is significantly lower than teachers across Wayne County and the state of North Carolina in regards to the same topic.

According to the NCTWCS, teacher’s opinions about school discipline are significantly lower than the county and state in nearly all areas. This is in contrast to the data from the last few years showing a reduction in discipline issues at the school.  The data shows the school has reduced major discipline violations substantially.  The difference between the NCTWCS results and the discipline data may be due to the perception of the teachers due to the large number of minor discipline offenses such as tardies, dress code and cell phone violations.  These have been addressed using Hero tracking system.  The school has seen a dramatic reduction in these minor violations

According to the NCTWCS, most staff members do not feel staff development is differentiated to meet the individual needs of teachers.  

Based upon the analysis conducted, what 3 top priorities emerge for the school? (Add charts and Graphs)

Southern Wayne High School needs to exceed growth and increase its performance grade of students scoring proficient in Math I, English II, Biology, all NC Final Exams, and all CTE exams to a minimum of C  

Southern Wayne will develop and retain a highly competent and professional staff.  

Southern Wayne High School will increase student and parent involvement to promote

a safe and positive school culture.

Priority Goal 1 and Associated Strategies

School Goal 1:

Southern Wayne High School survey results will show a 10% improvement in student, staff, and parent perception that we provide a safe orderly environment which promotes healthy, responsible students

Supports this District Goal:

District Goal 3: Wayne County Public Schools students will be healthy and responsible.

Assigned Implementation Team:

Crisis Team, Administration

Goal 1 Improvement Strategies

Strategy 1:  Increase staff, student, and community awareness/engagement for school safety issues, needs, and concerns; as well as, clarify and communicate district- and school-level policies and procedures pertaining to identified areas.

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Complete all requirements for the CIRC (Black Box)

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Create a Crisis Plan utilizing School Safety Components Template

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Implement Emergency Action Plan: Student Response Team for Athletics

2015-2016

In Progress

Participate in district and site professional development focusing on emergency response.

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Strategy 2:  Staff at Southern Wayne High School will be well-equipped to provide a safe and orderly environment.

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Conduct Deborah Greenblatt staff development concerning possible restraint

Completed

August 2015

Conduct staff development on blood borne pathogens

Completed

August 2015

Conduct training on bullying/harassment prevention

Completed

August 2015

Conduct critical incident drills

Once every semester

Scheduled Sept2015

Scheduled Feb 2016

Conduct monthly fire drills

Ongoing

In progress

Conduct Bus safety education and safety drills

Fall 2015

Conduct tornado drill

March  2016

First responders have up to date training on CPR, first aid, Epipen, asthma and diabetic response

Completed

August 2015

Strategy 3:  Students at Southern Wayne High School will receive appropriate support to encourage and maintain a safe and orderly environment

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Counseling  and teacher mediation will be provided

Ongoing through 2015-2016 year

In progress

Success coaches will provide mentoring for at risk students

Ongoing through 2015-2016 year

In progress

Saint Success will be held 4 days a week for 30 minutes per day

Ongoing through 2015-2016 year

In progress

College Advisor will provide mentoring/advice for all students to attend college/higher education

Ongoing through 2015-2016 year

In progress

The Renaissance Program using Hero Points will be used to promote and celebrate student success

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In progress

School will use Hero Positive Behavior points to support positive student behavior

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Freshman Focus – high school transition program using student mentors for freshman

2015-2016

In Progress

The school will use Character Development and Leadership program during Saint Success to promote character education and leadership skills

Ongoing through 2015-2016 year

In Progress

Provide Positive Behavior Intervention and Support for identified students through MTSS (Multi-Tiered System Support)

Ongoing through 2015-2016 year

In progress

What data will be used to determine whether the strategies were deployed with fidelity?

Measure

Jan

June

Jan

June

Discipline Data  10%

NC Working Conditions Survey 10%

Student, Staff, and Parent Surveys

Professional Development logs

Success Coaches log

Hero Data 10%

Hero Letters sent home

MTSS minutes and notes

What are the artifacts used to document the strategies and action steps?

What does data show regarding the results of the implemented strategies?


Priority Goal 2 and Associated Strategies

School Goal 2:

100% of Southern Wayne High School’s teachers will work towards analyzing and utilizing data to inform and instruct students

Supports this District Goal:

District Goal 1: Wayne County Public Schools will produce globally competitive students.

Assigned Implementation Team:

Instructional Leadership Team, Guidance staff, Administration

Goal 2 Improvement Strategies

Strategy 1:  WCPS data pools will be used throughout the instructional process as a mechanism for planning and adapting instruction. 

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Coaching conducted by Teacher-Leaders, and Administrators during PLCs to create, revise, and implement weekly and daily plans.

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Conferencing with students to create individual goals, as well as track student progress and mastery.

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Utilization of data pools to identify and develop individualized staff development for staff by the instructional leadership team

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Strategy 2:  Southern Wayne High School data pools will be used throughout the instructional process as a mechanism for planning and adapting instruction

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Formation of departmental and subject area data pools

Ongoing

In Progress

Use of formative assessment to provide timely adaptation and alignment of instruction

Ongoing through 2014-2015 school year

In Progress

Use of summative assessment to refine current progression and long term instruction/planning

Ongoing through 2014-2015 school year

In Progress

Develop open communication channels with EC department to address specific student needs

Ongoing through 2014-2015 school year

In Progress

Strategy 3:  Individual Teacher data pools will be used throughout the instructional process as a mechanism for planning and adapting instruction

Action Steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Utilization of individual data pools to identify and develop specific individualized staff development for staff by the instructional leadership team

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Link ELEOT walk-throughs to individualized data pools to identify instructional strategies for specific staff improvement

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Teachers will observe peers and conference with them using ELEOT focusing on their needs identified by PDP and self-assessment once a month at minimum.  Conference

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

In progress

What data will be used to determine whether the strategies were deployed with fidelity?

Measure

Jan

June

Jan

June

EVAAS

Benchmark Assessments

EOC/NC Final Exam

ELEOT Walk Through data

Classroom data logs/Gradebooks

Individual Student work

What are the artifacts used to document the strategies and action steps?

What does data show regarding the results of the implemented strategies?

Priority Goal 3 and Associated Strategies

School Goal 3:

100% of Southern Wayne High School’s teachers will implement personalized professional development activities focused on the use of SchoolNet.

Supports this District Goal:

Faculty and Administration will be given the opportunity to earn 1.0+ digital literacy credits by completing courses offered onsite and online for School Net.

Assigned Implementation Team:

Media and Technology Advisory Committee, Professional Development Committee, Media Coordinators, and Instructional Technology Specialists

Goal 3 Improvement Strategies

Strategy 1:  Provide updated technology to staff and students to develop, utilize, engage, and administer SchoolNet resources and assessments

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Purchase desktop computers for each classroom

Fall 2015

In Progress

Purchase laptop computer for each classroom

Fall 2015

In Progress

Purchase 2 class sets of Chrome Books for each hallway for student use

Fall 2015

In Progress

Purchase Bright Links for each core subject and ESL classroom

Fall 2015

In Progress

Strategy 2:  Locate, review and create resources in SchoolNet

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Provide Staff Development on SchoolNet

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

Monitor and share staff use of resources in PLC and department meetings

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

Strategy 3: Locate, review and create assessments in SchoolNet

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Provide staff development on SchoolNet

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

Monitor and share staff use of resources in PLC and department meetings

Ongoing through 2015-2016 school year

What data will be used to determine whether the strategies were deployed with fidelity?

Measure

Jan

June

Jan

June

Participation in Professional Development

Implementation of Learning

Purchase orders

What are the artifacts used to document the strategies and action steps?

What does data show regarding the results of the implemented strategies?

Priority Goal 4 and Associated Strategies

School Goal 4:

Southern Wayne High School will exceed growth and increase performance grade of students scoring proficient in Math I, English II, Biology, all NC Final Exams, and all CTE exams to a minimum of C

Supports this District Goal:

Goal 1: Wayne County Public Schools will produce globally competitive students.

Assigned Implementation Team:

Instructional Leadership Team, School Improvement Team, Administration,  

Goal 3 Improvement Strategies

Strategy 1:  Develop and implement Saint Success Remediation/Enrichment program to provide opportunity for Algebra I, Biology, and English II remediation and enrichment for at risk and academically successful students

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Schedule to include Saint Success Period (4 days a week, 25 minutes per day)

August 2015

Completed

Develop list of remediation/enrichment activities

October

Identify students needing remediation/enrichment.  Look at EVAAS to identify level II students for remediation

October 2015 & January, 2016

Teach small remediation groups in Algebra I, English II, Biology

Throughout 2015-2016 school year.

In Progress

Schedule Foundations for Math for LEP/At Risk students – taught by bi lingual math teacher

Throughout 2015-2016 school year.

In Progress

Schedule Foundations for English for LEP/At Risk students (9th Grade)

Throughout 2015-2016 school year.

In Progress

Strategy 2:  Utilize Saint Success period to provide 4 ½ week of extended class time to allow for review and remediation in preparation for exams

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Develop schedule to extend classes 30 minutes once per week during the last 4 ½ weeks of the semester

August 2015

Completed

Strategy 3:  Utilize standardized aligned agendas to conduct all staff, leadership, department, and subject area meetings.  All agenda items will align to SIP/AdvancED goals & strategies

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Develop meeting template

Fall 2015

In progress

Provide training on use of template

Fall 2015

In Progress

Monitor use of template

2015- 2016

In progress

Use agenda information to revise school practices and procedures

2015- 2016

In Progress

Strategy 4:  Conduct focused staff development on improving planning and instruction that aligns to  SCOS/Common Core methodology

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Initial Staff Development on components of improved lesson plans

August – December 2015

In Progress

Conduct periodic review/feedback of lesson plans

Throughout 2015-2016 school year.

In Progress

Departmental PLC on components of lesson plan

Throughout 2015-2016 school year.

In Progress

Strategy 5:  Use ELEOT to improve classroom instruction

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Develop walk through observation matrix to track walk-throughs

September 2015

Completed

Conduct walk-throughs

Throughout 2015-2016 school year.

In Progress

Develop online Google ELEOT form to collect data

September 2015

In Progress

Conduct Walk-Through team meetings

Throughout 2015-2016 school year.

In Progress

Share walk through data with staff to revise instructional practices and procedures

Throughout 2015-2016 school year.

In Progress

Strategy 6:  Utilize  School Net and Class scape to improve instruction and assessment

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Train Staff on School Net/Class scape

Fall 2015

Use programs

2015-2016

In Progress

Strategy 7:  Align taught and tested curriculum

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Develop curriculum alignment plan

Fall 2015

In Progress

Carry out curriculum alignment plan

Spring 2016

In Progress

Monitor implementation of plan and its results on student achievement

Spring 2016

In Progress

Strategy 8:  Increase teacher and student awareness of ACT test taking strategies and skills, as well as provide rigorous classroom instruction

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Select teachers received training on ACT strategies

August 2015

Completed

Identify 11th grade students who could benefit from ACT test taking Strategies

September 2015

Completed

Teach ACT test taking strategies during Saint Success for all 11th graders

Ongoing through 2015-2016

In Progress

Strategy 9:  Increase teacher and student awareness of Work Keys test taking strategies and skills, as well as provide rigorous classroom instruction

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Select teachers received training on WorkKeys strategies

August 2015

Completed

Identify 12th grade students who could benefit from Work Keys test taking Strategies

September 2015

Completed

Teach Work Keys test taking strategies during Saint Success for selected 12th graders

Ongoing through 2015-2016

In Progress

What data will be used to determine whether the strategies were deployed with fidelity?

Measure

Jan

June

Jan

June

Walk Through Data

EOC Data 5%

NC Final Exam Data 5%

ACT Data 5%

CTE Data 5%

Work Keys Data 5%

Benchmark Assessments

What are the artifacts used to document the strategies and action steps?

What does data show regarding the results of the implemented strategies?

Priority Goal 5 and Associated Strategies

School Goal 5:

 Southern Wayne High School will increase student and parent  involvement to promote a safe and positive school culture as measured through AdvancED surveys, membership in extra-curricular activities, and Positive Behavior Support data from Hero

Supports this District Goal:

Wayne County Public Schools students will be healthy and responsible.

Assigned Implementation Team:

 Administrators, Staff members, Parents, Students, Community Members

Goal 4 Improvement Strategies

Strategy 1:  Implement Hero PBS program school wide

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Develop Positive and negative consequences/goals

Fall 2015

In Progress

Inform students and stakeholders of PBS program

Fall 2015

In progress

Monitor and revise PBS program

2015-2016

In Progress

Develop school wide Hero Goals and tie to current Renaissance Program

Fall 2015

Implement Hero Positive point store

Fall 2015

In Progress

Mail home Hero positive point letters to parents

2015-2016

In Progress

Strategy 2:  Implement PlascoTrac Visitor pass program school wide

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Install hardware and Train staff  

Fall 2015

Inform students and stakeholders of visitor pass program

Fall 2015

Monitor and revise visitor pass program

2015-2016 School Year

Strategy 3:  Staff of SWHS will host Spring Family Night/Curriculum Fair.  

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Set date for Family Night to be held.  

November 2015

Assign staff members duties for family night.

January 2016

Send out invitations to families with students.

February 2016

Staff, students, and parents will attend spring Family Night

March 2016

Strategy 4:  Southern Wayne will increase school spirit of students

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Develop/implement Saint Success enrichment program

Throughout 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Conduct Club Rush Week to increase club enrollment

September 2015

Completed

Conduct Senior Luau

June 2016

Not Started

Hold Powder Puff Football Game

Fall 2015

Not Started

Develop grade level spirit competitions

Throughout 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Strategy 5:  Southern Wayne will Beautify the school’s campus  

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Continue Landscaping of school

Fall 2015

In Progress

Finish press box/concession stand for softball

Fall 2015

In Progress

Replace school’s marquee sign

Fall 2015

In Progress

Paint murals/art work in hallways

Throughout 2015-2016 school year

In Progress

Strategy 6:  Celebrate School’s 50th Anniversary  

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Develop/plan celebration activities  

September 2015

In Progress

Conduct Booster Club/School Club Reverse Raffle and Homecoming celebration night

October 2015

Conduct Miss Southern Wayne Pageant

Spring 2016

Celebrate former state championship teams

Throughout 2015-2016 school year

Institute Hall of Fame

May 2016

Hold an Alumni Dinner

May 2016

Strategy 7:  Develop and implement Saint Success Remediation/Enrichment program to provide opportunity enrichment for students

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Revise school bell schedule to include Saint Success Period (4 days a week, 25 minutes per day) Rotate activities every 4 ½ weeks

August 2015

Completed

Develop list of enrichment activities

September 2015

In Progress

Identify students needing enrichment

September 2015 & January 2016

In Progress

Teach enrichment activities

Throughout 2015-2016 school year.

In Progress

Strategy 8:  Increase Partner in Education participation and support

Action steps:

Timeline:

Status:

Send invitations to local businesses inviting them to be partners in education

October 2015

Completed

Send surveys to all partners in education

November 2015

Conduct partner in education reception at Southern Wayne

Fall 2015

Cancelled

Set up field trips/student shadowing at partners in education businesses

Spring 2015

In Progress

What data will be used to determine whether the strategies were deployed with fidelity?

Measure

Jan

June

Jan

June

Plasco Trac Hero Data

Attendance at Spring Family Night

Club Membership

Student surveys

Parent and Community Surveys

Feedback from Saint Success

What are the artifacts used to document the strategies and action steps?

What does data show regarding the results of the implemented strategies?

Title 1 School-Wide Compliance Review and Plan

School Prioritized Plan

Based on the annual review of the school needs assessment data encompassing all domains, describe the prioritized plans for the new project year that have the greatest likelihood of ensuring that all groups of students specified in section 1111(b)(2)(C)(v) and enrolled in the school will meet the State's proficient level of achievement as determined by AMOs (Annual Measurable Objectives) on the State’s academic assessments. Describe three to five prioritized program goals that address identified needs.  NOTE:  These program goals should be included in the school’s comprehensive plan for improvement and do not alone constitute a Title I plan.

Student Achievement Goals.  Include Targeted Subgroup(s)

Action Step(s)

Assessment(s) and/or Other Measures Used to Determine Outcome

Timeline of Evaluation Including Interim and Final

Professional Development Needed to Support the Action Step(s)

Parental Involvement Needed to Support the Action Step(s)

Southern Wayne High School will increase number of students scoring proficient in Math I, English II, Biology, all NC Final Exams, ACT, Work Keys, and all VOCATS exams by 5%

(ESL, Black, Hispanic, SWD, EDs)

Develop and implement Saint Success Remediation/Enrichment program to provide opportunity for Algebra I, Biology, and English II remediation and enrichment for at risk and academically successful students

Teach ACT test taking strategies during Saint Success for all 11th graders

Teach small remediation groups in Algebra I, English II, Biology

Schedule Foundations for Math for LEP/At Risk students – taught by bi lingual math teacher

Schedule Foundations for English for LEP/At Risk students (9th Grade)

SchoolNet Benchmark

EOC’s

NC Final Exams

ACT

Formative Assessment

ELEOT

Every 3 weeks

9 weeks

End of semester

SchoolNet

ACT

ELEOT

SchoolNet reports for Parents

ACT reports for parents

NC Final exams scores

Implement personalized professional development activities and resources, based on current research and selected by the needs of staff, that are aligned to digital competencies for educators and focus on current products available in the district for the 2015-2016 school year.

(All sub groups)

Provide updated technology to staff and students to develop, utilize, engage, and administer SchoolNet resources and assessments 

Locate, review and create assessments in SchoolNet

Provide updated technology to staff and students to develop, utilize, engage, and administer SchoolNet resources and assessments

SchoolNet Benchmark

Every 3 weeks

9 weeks

End of semester

SchoolNet

SchoolNet reports for Parents


Develop and implement Saint Success Remediation/Enrichment program to provide opportunity for Algebra I, Biology, and English II remediation and enrichment for at risk and academically successful students

(Sub groups – ESL, Black, EDS, SWD, Hispanic)

Identify students needing remediation/enrichment.  Look at EVASS to identify level II students for remediation

Teach small remediation groups in Algebra I, English II, Biology

SchoolNet Benchmark

EOC’s

NC Final Exams

ACT

Formative Assessment

ELEOT

Every 3 weeks

9 weeks

End of semester

SchoolNet

ACT

ELEOT

SchoolNet reports for Parents

ACT reports for parents

NC Final exams scores


SCHOOLWIDE PROJECT SCHOOLS

Provide a SCHOOL summary of the ten (10) schoolwide components being implemented in participating schools, as described in section 1114. All activities in schoolwide projects should reflect the statutory requirement that schools particularly address the needs of low-achieving children and those at risk of not meeting the state student academic achievement standards as determined by the comprehensive needs assessment of the school. Attach additional pages as needed.

1.  SCHOOL REFORM STRATEGIES

School wide reform strategies provide opportunities for all children in the school to meet or exceed North Carolina’s proficient and advanced levels of student performance.  The ways we will address the needs of all children in the school particularly the needs of students furthest away from demonstrating proficiency related to the State’s academic content and student academic achievement standards are…

  1. Use of technological devices: To extend learning opportunities for students during school and to create an interactive classroom that allows teachers to readily assess mastery of skills.

Integration of technology into instruction (Cook, Sawyer, & Lee, 2013).

The integration of technology into traditional classroom instruction presents an array of problems for teachers. Too often teachers’ perceptions of technology tend to be negative for a variety of reasons: lack of time to explore and learn, lack of access, lack of scaffolding and support, and inadequate technological knowledge to name but a few (Hutchison, 2012). Compounding teachers’ perceptions is the lack of quality and ongoing professional development designed to assist teachers in making the move to technology integration. In an effort to make technology use easier for teachers and more engaging for students, the local school will provide job embedded and curriculum related professional development using technology in a hands-on way.

Cook, M., Sawyer, D. & Lee, S. (2013). Integrating Technology into Classroom Instruction: A Teacher Model Made Easy. In R. McBride & M. Searson (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2013 (pp. 5133-138). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

  1. Saint Success Remediation and Enrichment: 30 minutes four times a week.  During this period, remediation in EOC’s, and WorkKeys will be provided to students whose EVAAS/Work keys scores warrant their need for remediation.  In addition, Freshman Focus, a high school transition program, and Character Development and Leadership, a character education program, will also be implement for selected students.  ACT preparation instruction will be offered to most 11th grade students.

Mandatory in school remediation periods are a necessity in high schools in order to ensure graduation and reduce dropout rates. They can raise test scores and improve student morale (Nagel, 2010).  Shields (2011) believes that “education should develop intellectual character, moral character, civic character, and performance character” and argues that “schools have too often equated excellence with the quantity of content learned, rather than with the quality of the character the person develops” (p. 49).

Nagel, D. (2010). Built-in remediation. Educational Leadership, 68(2), 66-67.

Shields, D.L. (2011). Character as the aim of education. Phi Delta Kappan, 92(8), 48-53.

  1. Peer Collaboration: To incorporate differentiated instruction strategies to support the various ways that students can demonstrate an understanding of content.  Peers will observe another teacher at least once a month and use components of the ELEOT observation instrument as a tool to assist in peer collaboration.  

Peer observations results will be collected in a spreadsheet and will be used in subject PLC’s to provide resources for incorporation of differentiated instruction strategies as well as support teachers in fulfilment of their Professional Development Plan.

Principles for Effective Teamwork." ENC Online: Excerpts from Guidelines for Effective Teamwork. The Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education . 08 Jul. 2005

  1. Relevant Differentiated Professional Development: Instructional leadership team will provide individualized differentiated professional development to staff members based on needs identified by observations, ELEOT, test scores, EVAAS scores and other factors.  

Instructional leadership teams consists of

Principal

Assistant Principals

Teacher Learning Coach

Technology Coordinator

Media Coordinator

Department Chairs (when appropriate)

Professional development will be in one or more of 5 areas.  These include a. student engagement, b. differentiated instruction, c. assessment, d. lesson plans, and e. Reaching AG/advanced students.  The Instructional Coaches will provide additional support to beginning teachers on implementing effective instructional strategies via professional development and/or modeling lessons.

Group Task Behaviors and Roles." ENC Online: Excerpts from Guidelines for Effective Teamwork. The Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education . 08 Jul. 2005

  1. Parent Involvement: Supplies and resources to provide training for parents so they may better support their children academically.  

Resources include Parent Resource Room, College Advisor, Success Coaches, parent communication including Remind, school’s web page, Home Base parent access, and Hero app and a number of parent meetings held at the school.

Clark, R.M. (1990). Why Disadvantaged Children Succeed. Public Welfare (Spring): 17-23.




2.  INSTRUCTION BY HIGHLY QUALIFIED STAFF


The administrators, teachers, and support staff at Southern Wayne High School are all certified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Currently, all but one of our teachers are considered highly qualified according to Title II, Part A Improving Teacher Quality of the
No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB).Southern Wayne High School will be working toward assisting this teacher in meeting the requirements to become highly qualified. Letters were be sent home to parents of any students receiving instruction from this teacher on Friday, September 25, 2015.

The faculty and staff for 2015-2016 will consist of the following:

3 Administrators

81 Teachers

1 Instructional Coaches/Content Area Specialists (Part time)

3 Counselors

1 Media Specialist

1 College Advisor/ Parent Coordinator

6 Teacher Assistants

1 Technology Coordinator

5 Clerical Staff

8 Food Service Staff

4 Custodians

Of the certified staff at Southern Wayne High School, 73% hold bachelor’s degrees, 21% advanced degrees, and 2% hold doctoral degrees.  10% of teachers are National Board certified.  The average number of years of experience for certified teachers is 10.67.


3.    HIGH QUALITY AND ONGOING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT


In addition to individualized differentiated professional development to staff members we have included teachers, administration, paraprofessionals, and if appropriate, parents and other staff in our staff development that address the root causes of our identified needs. For example:

SchoolNet – School wide staff development will be held on the use of SchoolNet assessments to as formative and benchmark assessments in all core subject classes.  This staff development will include locating assessments, creating assessments, using short frequent benchmark assessments as formative assessments, data collection, and use of data provided by assessments to improve instruction and student achievement.

Language Arts – To improve writing and thinking skills, all subject area teachers and will participate in a workshop geared toward using writing as a method and model of thinking to increase students’ critical thinking abilities and comprehension strategies that can be utilized by teachers of all content areas to further develop students’ literacy skills during curriculum meetings and subject area collaborative planning sessions. Sophomore Language Arts teachers will engage in collaborative planning to align taught and tested curriculum.

Math – Math I and Math II teachers will receive release time to participate in professional learning opportunities that will be structured to improve pacing, content alignment, and support classes for students with the greatest deficiencies in math. All math teachers will participate in a workshop geared toward using writing as a method and model of thinking to increase students’ critical thinking abilities.  Math I teachers will engage in collaborative planning to align taught and tested curriculum.

Science – Science teachers will receive release time to participate in professional learning opportunities that will be structured to improve pacing, content alignment, and support classes for students with the greatest deficiencies in science. All science teachers will participate in a workshop geared toward using writing as a method and model of thinking to increase students’ critical thinking abilities. Biology teachers will engage in collaborative planning to align taught and tested curriculum.

Social Studies –Social Studies teachers will participate in a workshop geared toward using writing as a method and model of thinking to increase students’ critical thinking abilities and comprehension strategies that can be utilized by teachers of all content areas to further develop students’ literacy skills during curriculum meetings and subject area collaborative planning sessions.

Southern Wayne High School will participate in local, district, and/or state level professional development to better assist parents with skills and strategies to assist their students academically.  Southern Wayne High School has aligned professional development with the state’s academic content and student academic achievement standards by designing staff development opportunities that will allow teachers to better support students in their ability to demonstrate mastery as measured

4.  STRATEGIES TO ATTRACT HIGH QUALITY TEACHERS TO HIGH NEEDS SCHOOLS


We will provide instruction by highly qualified teachers who meet the standards established by North Carolina (use HiQ report and school staff roster and describe how certification deficiencies are being addressed)…Southern Wayne High School recruits highly qualified teachers via the system level recruitment efforts provided by the department of Human Resources, recommendations from practicing teachers, student teaching invitations, and the WCPS and DPI websites. Once hired, new teachers: attend a 10-day local new teacher orientation, participate in a year-long TLC program, participate in professional learning opportunities, participate in instructional collaboration meeting, and meet monthly with the administrator over new teachers to discuss and address issues that directly impact them.

Teachers, who are not highly qualified, work closely with their department chair, department administrator, principal’s secretary, and county level designees, and the NC DPI to remedy deficient areas in order to become highly qualified.


5.  INCLUDING TEACHERS IN DECISIONS REGARDING THE USE OF ASSESSMENTS


Southern Wayne High School has an Instructional Leadership Team as well as a School Improvement Team, both comprised of teachers and administrators, who collaborate to establish a process for analyzing assessment data and using such data in the improvement of student achievement. Core content teachers meet by departments to develop common assessments and review and analyze assessment data.

6. STRATEGIES TO INCREASE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT (also explain how assessment results will be reported to parents)


A. Southern Wayne High School will involve parents in an organized, ongoing, and timely way in the planning,review, and improvement of schoolwide programs and the school parental involvement policy. Southern Wayne High School will schedule a Title I Planning Meeting and invite parents of all students, school staff, students, and community members to attend. Southern Wayne High School will continuously solicit the input of its parents and make efforts to engage migrantand homeless parents, as well as those with disabilities. This is accomplished through

surveys informational meetings, individual meetings in the Parent Center, and from parent

or counselor contacts. In addition, evaluation forms at the end of each workshop or

meeting will be a way for parents to voice any concerns or requests. Parents are free to

provide their names and phone numbers on the evaluations forms.

B. We will update the school parental involvement policy periodically to meet the changing

needs of parents and the school and distribute it to the parents of participating children

and make the parental involvement plan available to the local community. During the

Title I Annual Planning Meeting, Southern Wayne High School parents will assist in planning,

developing, and approving the school’s Title I Schoolwide Program Plan and Budget, as

well as parent involvement documents - School-Parent Compact, and Title I Parent

Involvement Policy. Parents will continually be invited to participate in the Title I, Local

School Council meetings, and other planning processes of the school.

C. We will conduct an annual meeting, at a convenient time, to inform parents about the

school’s Title I program, the nature of the Title I program, the parents’ requirements

and the school parental involvement policy, the schoolwide plan, and the school-parent

compact and encourage and invite all parents of participating children to attend. Parents

will be invited to the Title I Annual Parent Meeting through solicitations at Curriculum

Night, Title I Parent Meetings, flyers, formal invitations, telephone dial out system,

marquee, the school’s website, and/or report cards. The Title I Annual Meeting will be

held at Berkmar High School on September 28, 2013 at 6:30 PM for the parents of all students. This Annual meeting will be facilitated by the Principal of the school.  Another meeting will be scheduled in early Spring

D. We will offer a flexible number of meetings, such as meetings in the morning or evening,

and may provide, with funds provided under Title I, transportation, child care, or home

visits, as such services relate to parental involvement. Southern Wayne High School will hold two Title I Annual Meetings on different days and at different times and have several

workshops for parents which will be outlined in the school’s 2015-16 Parent Involvement

Calendar of Events.

E. We will provide parents of participating children with timely information about the Title I

program, a description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms

of academic assessments used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels

students are expected to meet, and provide opportunities for regular meetings, if requested

by parents, to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating

to the education of their child, and respond to any such suggestions as soon as practicably

possible.

Timely information about the Title I programs will be disseminated through flyers, formal invitations, email, Remind, automated phone call out, marquee and the school’s website.

Description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms of

academic assessments used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels

students are expected to meet.  Students are issued a student handbook, which

gives and overview of the curriculum, state and local assessments, and promotion/graduation requirements.

State and district assessments administered to students include: End-of-Couse

Tests (EOC), NC Final Exams, Work Keys, CTE Exams, and ACT

Parents may find additional information about the school’s curriculum and assessment by visiting the WCPS and DPI websites, contacting the Parent ort Coordinator, at (919) 705-6060, or by scheduling an appointment with one of the school’s counselors. Southern Wayne faculty and staff are committed to the highest quality academic achievement for all students.

Opportunities for regular meetings, if requested by parents, to formulate

suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education

of their child, and respond to any such suggestions as soon as practicably possible.

The Parent Center will make parents aware of other opportunities for parent to

offer suggestions and participate in decision making by inviting all parents to be

part of the Title I Planning Meeting, Parent Advisory Council (PAC), Title I

meetings, Open House, and Individual Education Program meetings, Parent-Teacher-Student Associations, and parent conferences. Parents may contact teachers and administrators to schedule conferences at any time during the year. Southern Wayne  High School staff will make it a point to respond to all calls and correspondence within a timely manner.

F. We will jointly develop with parents of participating children a school-parent compact

that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility

for improved student academic achievement and the means by which the school and

parents will build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the state’s high

standards. Southern Wayne High School has developed and annually revises a School-Parent

Compact along with parents, student volunteers, and members of the community, and

school administration and faculty. All parents and students are invited each year by the

school principal to attend the Title I Planning Meeting to provide input in revising the

Compact. This School-Parent Compact sets the expectations of each of the parties

regarding the responsibilities for the education of student.

The compact will be sent home to all families with the students and will be posted on the

school’s website and in the Parent Center. The Compact will be signed and dated by the

teacher, student, and parent(s). The School-Parent Compact will be revisited with parents

during conferences and other Title I meetings.

G. We will provide assistance to parents of participating children, as appropriate, in

understanding the state’s academic content standards, the state’s student academic

achievement standards, the state and local academic assessments including alternate

assessments, the requirements of Title I, how to monitor their child’s progress,

and how to work with educators. The key method Southern Wayne High School will use to

provide assistance to parents in understanding the State’s academic content standards and

assessments is through informational meetings and workshops covering the following

topics: assisting parents in understanding Benchmarks, End of Course Tests (EOC), Georgia ACT, Work Keys, CTE Exams, Advanced Placement Exams (AP), monitoring their child’s

progress, partnering with the teacher to improve their child’s achievement, Advanced

Placement and information about transitions to high school and post-secondary education.

Parents will also have access to information through individual meetings with,

school counselors, or administrators.

Parents also have access to the Parent Portal which can be found on the district’s website,

http://www.waynecountyschools.org The Parent Portal is a way parents can view their child’s grades immediately after his/her teacher enters them in the grade book. By viewing their

children’s grades, parents will be able to easily monitor their child’s progress in each class.

H. We will provide materials and training to help parents to work with their child to improve

their child’s achievement, such as literacy training and using technology, as appropriate,

to foster parental involvement. Southern Wayne High School will provide materials and training,

such as: literacy training and using technology, as appropriate, to foster parental

involvement and help parents work with their child to improve their child’s achievement.

The Parent Center will provide materials and training to help parents work with their

children to improve their child’s success. These trainings will be provided by the Parent Coordinator, school counselors, school administrators or teachers, external presenters, district

personnel, or others. Parents who are unable to attend trainings or workshops will be able to requestmaterials to be sent home.

The PC can be contacted at (919) 705-6060. When practical, interpretation will be

provided for our Spanish speaking families

.

I. We will provide training to educate the teachers, pupil services personnel, principal,

and other staff in how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal

partners, in the value and utility of contributions of parents, and in how to implement and

coordinate parent programs, and build ties between parents and the school, by:

Conducting training for the staff during departmental meetings and planning time

on how to best communicate effectively with parents.

Placing a suggestion box is located in the Parent Center to gather suggestions and

comments from parents.

Using parent feedback and minutes from Title I meetings and workshops to find

ways to better build communication between parents and teachers.

J. We will, to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate parental

involvement programs and activities with Head Start, Even Start, Home Instruction

Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the Parents as Teachers Program, and public

preschool and other programs, and conduct other activities, such as parent resource

centers, that encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the education

of their children. The school will help students transition from middle school to high

school and high school to post-secondary education. This will be done through

information provided by Southern Wayne High School counselors and teachers. Southern Wayne High.  School staff will collaborate with State and other WCPS personnel to provide services for

our homeless and migrant population. The PC will encourage and support parents

during the high school transition periods mentioned above.

K. We will take the following actions to ensure that information related to the school and

parent programs, meetings, and other activities, is sent to the parents of participating

children in an understandable and uniform format, including alternative formats upon

request, and, to the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand. Southern Wayne  will use clear, simple, and parent-friendly language to communicate information related to

school and parent programs. Information will be translated into Spanish and other

languages when appropriate. In order to maintain contact with the parents, the school will

use automated calling systems, school marquee, school website, e-mails, newsletters,

flyers, and other means of communication.

L. We will provide full opportunities, to the extent practicable, for the participation of

parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of

migratory children, including providing information and school reports required under

section 1111 of the ESEA in an understandable and uniform format and including

alternative formats upon request, and, to the extent practicable, in a language parents

understand. When appropriate, Title I funds will be used for childcare, interpreters,

transportation, and technological services at parent involvement activities.



7.  TRANSITION STRATEGIES


Following are our plans for assisting entering high school plus students entering our school throughout the school year. New students entering Southern Wayne High School meet with a counselor. While we do not have pre-school children transitioning to high school, we do have procedures in place to assist incoming 9th grade students and to assist at-risk 12th graders in graduating.

8th Grade to High School Transitional Plan:

∙    9th Grade Articulation in March/April is facilitated by the counselors from both the middle

      and high school and the administrators.

∙    The Parent Transition guide is sent home to families of current 8th grade students in

      January to give parents an opportunity to review the information prior to the Spring  

      articulation meeting.

∙    The handbook contains graduation requirements, policies and procedures, scholarship

      opportunities, tips for parents to help their child get acclimated to high school, information  

      about core academic classes, information about elective classes and pathways, AP

      (Advanced Placement) opportunities in high school, and information on all extracurricular

      activities at high school.

∙    Eighth grade students from the feeder middle schools visit the high school, tour the facility,

and attend a presentation coordinated by the 9th grade administrators, 9th grade teachers, and student leaders.

∙    Curriculum Night for prospective 9th grade students is held in early April.

Parents are made aware of course offerings, support available, and how they can assist their students in choosing the correct courses for success in high school. Scheduling of freshmen classes for the next year begins at this time.

∙    Periodic 9th grade programs for students, such as freshman orientation during the first month  

      of school, are provided to provide support to freshmen.

High School to Post High School Transitional Plan:

∙     Senior Parent meeting in the fall to provide post-secondary options to parents and students.

∙     Junior Parent meeting in the fall on state testing and the requirements for graduation.

∙     Financial aid and financial planning workshop to provide information on financial aid and  

       how to apply.

∙     College Advisor meets with all seniors and juniors to offer assistance in all aspects of

       applying to college

∙     Success Coaches mentor and provide at risk seniors with assistance in order to graduate

∙     Visitations to Southern Wayne by college and technical school recruiters

∙     Visitations to Southern Wayne by military recruiters.

8.  ACTIVITIES FOR CHILDREN EXPERIENCING DIFFICULTY


Increased student/teacher interaction, due to lower class size, allows teachers to better identify most at risk learners. We are providing activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards shall be provided with effective, timely additional assistance. Those activities are: Credit Recovery, and Saint Success. Teachers monitor students’ ability to grasp concepts through daily informal assessments, such as observations, student responses in class, quizzes, and SchoolNet Formative Assessments. Semi-monthly, teachers meet in a collaborative setting to identify and discuss students’ academic needs. Interim Assessments are used to assess students’ knowledge in a pre-, mid-,and post-test fashion, each semester. Student-teacher conferences are held periodically throughout the semester to discuss student performance. RTI interventions, differentiation of instruction (Strategies classes for math support), small group/one-on-one intervention, and opportunities for co-teaching (ESL & SPED) are strategies that also help to ensure that student weaknesses are identified in a timely manner. Additionally, administrators review and monitor the success/failure rates of teachers in their respective subject area departments.

9.  COORDINATION AND INTEGRATION OF FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL SERVICES


We will, to the extent practicable, coordinate Federal, State, and local programs to provide services to students.

Federal Programs:

Title I, Part A, including Neglected & Delinquent

Title I, Part C – Migrant Education

Title II – Eisenhower Grant funds for Math and Science Professional Learning

Title III

Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA)

Federal School Nutrition Program

McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Act

District (local) Programs:

State 411 Budget

Staff Development Funds

Wayne County Public School’s Staffing Allotments

Title III (ESL)

Special Education Programs

Support from the School Resource Officer

School Social Worker

Grade and Credit Recovery

College Advisor program

Success Coaches

10. RESOURCES USED IN PROGRAMS   Briefly summarize the Title I and other resources used in participating schools. Include instructional programs and how students will be served in the Title I program.


The data suggest the following Title I funding priorities:

Instructional Materials and Supplies: Purchase technology equipment to supplement

instruction (i.e. Bright Links); book sets to supplement the literacy initiative; materials in

language arts, math, science, and social studies to supplement each core curriculum area

Parent Involvement: Develop an on-site Parent Center, which provides resources for parent use; translators/interpreters to accommodate the needs of parents with limited English proficiency; increase availability and variety of academic resources for parents; presenters for parent workshops.

Professional Learning – Consultants; Collaborative planning opportunities with release time for

teachers; after-hours and summer professional learning; substitute teachers to allow for (teacher)

peer observations; stipends for the leadership team during off-contract time (summer) for

instructional data reviews and instructional planning.

Saint Success (for students) – Freshman Focus, Character Development and Leadership, Credit recovery, to address needs of at-risk students

 Southern Wayne High School will purchase:

Laptops

Desk Top computers

300 Chrome books and carts

Subject specific materials to supplement the language arts, math, science, and social studies curriculum

Conference registrations for teacher staff development

Training for staff in making data-driven decisions


Strategies for Improving Academic Performance of At-Risk Students

Pursuant to General Statute §115C-105.27(b), All schools shall include a plan that specifies the effective instructional practices and methods to be used to improve the academic performance of students identified as at risk of academic failure or at risk of dropping out of school;

Strategies for Providing Duty-Free Times

Pursuant to General Statute §115C-105.27(b), All schools shall include a plan to provide a duty-free lunch period for every teacher on a daily basis or as otherwise approved by the school improvement team; and shall include a plan to provide duty-free instructional planning time for every teacher under G.S. 115C301.1, with the goal of providing an average of at least five hours of planning time per week.

Strategies for Preventing the Inappropriate Use of Seclusion and Restraint

(Deborah Greenblatt Law)

Pursuant to General Statute §115C-391.1(a), It is the policy of the State of North Carolina to:

(1) Promote safety and prevent harm to all students, staff, and visitors in the public schools.

(2) Treat all public school students with dignity and respect in the delivery of discipline, use of physical restraints or seclusion, and use of reasonable force as permitted by law.

(3) Provide school staff with clear guidelines about what constitutes use of reasonable force permissible in North Carolina public schools.

(4) Improve student achievement, attendance, promotion, and graduation rates by employing positive behavioral interventions to address student behavior in a positive and safe manner.

(5) Promote retention of valuable teachers and other school personnel by providing appropriate training in prescribed procedures, which address student behavior in a positive and safe manner. 

Describe below the steps the school will take to prevent the inappropriate use of seclusion and restraint as outlined in the applicable General Statute.

Strategies for the Prevention of School Violence

Pursuant to General Statute §115C-407.17, Schools shall develop and implement methods and strategies for promoting school environments that are free of bullying or harassing behavior.

Describe below the steps the school will take to promote an environment free from bullying or harassing behavior.

Plan to Address School Safety and Discipline Concerns

Pursuant to General Statute §115C-105.27(b), [Schools] shall include a plan to address safety and discipline concerns.

In the table below, list and/or discuss the top three (3) safety and/or discipline concerns at your school, the strategies that you will use to address them, and the measures you will use to determine your effectiveness in improving in these areas.

Safety / Discipline Concerns

Strategies for Improvement

Measures to Determine Effectiveness

Public Access to school

  • Use Plasco Trac visitor pass
  • Plasco Trac reports

Reward positive behavior

  • Implement Hero Positive Behavior Support program
  • Develop grade level school spirit competition
  • Hero reports
  • Discipline referrals
  • Number of OSS
  • Number of ISS

Provide consistent negative consequences

  • Hero discipline data collection
  • Hero reports
  • Discipline referrals
  • Number of OSS
  • Number of ISS

Professional Development Plan

Professional Development Activity

Date

SIP/District Goal

Targeted Participants

State Conference/District-wide/In- school

Fund Source

Estimated

Amount

WCPS                C & I Institute

August 2015

District    Goal 3

Self-selected certified staff

District Wide

Other

Deborah Greenblatt Law Training

August 2015

District Goal3

All SWHS Staff

In-School

Other

Anti-Bullying Training

August 2015

District Goal3

All SWHS Staff

In-School

Other

Blood Borne Pathogens Training

August 2015

District Goal3

All SWHS Staff

In-School

Other

School Net

Fall 2015

SIP Goal 3/District Goal 3

All SWHS Staff

In-School

Other

Data Pools

10/14/2015

SIP Goal 3/District Goal 2

All SWHS Staff

In-School

Other

Lesson-Assessment Alignment

2015-2016

SIP Goal 3/District Goal 4

All SWHS Certified Staff

District Wide

Other

NOTE:  As you plan your professional development, please remember the requirements for staff training on the Deborah Greenblatt law, as well as your efforts to prevent bullying.

Southern Wayne High School

Chemical Hygiene Plan

for

High School Science Laboratories

Standard Operating Guidelines

General Employee Rules and Guidelines

  1. Minimize all chemical exposures.
  2. Avoid skin contact with chemicals.
  3. Avoid underestimation of chemical hazards and risks.
  4. Develop a firm goggle policy.  Wear appropriate eye protection at all times.  Chemical splash goggles must be worn any time chemicals, glassware, or heat are used in the laboratory.
  5. Always notify another person when working in the laboratory, chemical storage room, or prep areas.
  6. Flammable liquids require special attention.  Never use these materials near any source of ignition, spark, or open flame.
  7. Never perform a first-time chemical demonstration in front of your class.  Always perform first-time demonstrations in front of other instructors to evaluate the safety of the demonstration.
  8. Never store chemicals over, under, or near a sink.
  9. Only authorized personnel should be allowed in the chemical storage room.
  10. Have a fire blanket easily accessible in case of an accident.
  11. All science teachers should be knowledgeable on how to use all safety devices in the laboratory (e.g., eyewash fountains, safety showers, fire extinguisher, etc.) in order to use them quickly in an emergency.
  12. Know appropriate procedures in the event of a power failure.
  13. Have a plan in place for notifying appropriate personnel for utility control (gas, electrical, and water).
  14. Do not smell or taste chemicals.
  15. Use a safety shield whenever an explosion or implosion might occur.
  16. Read all chemical labels prior to use.
  17. Know and understand the hazards of the chemical as stated in the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and other references.
  18. Use protective safety equipment to reduce potential exposure, i.e. gloves, fume hood, ventilation fans, etc.
  19. Know the locations for all personal safety and emergency equipment, eye wash fountains, safety shower, fire extinguisher, and spill control materials.
  20. Know how to properly store all chemicals in their compatible chemical families. (Consult publications such as the Flinn Chemical Catalog/Reference Manual for details.)
  21. Know proper transportation and disposal procedures for chemicals.
  22. Know appropriate emergency procedures, waste disposal, spill clean up, evacuation routes and fire emergency notification.

23) Know and understand the personal hygiene practices outlined in the Chemical Hygiene Plan.

  1. General Laboratory Rules and Guidelines

  1. Create a written first aid policy; whether it says to treat or to seek further medical assistance.  Your first aid policy must be written down.
  2. The laboratory should be well ventilated.  
  1. A ventilation fan should remove the air a minimum of 8 air changes per hour.  Air for laboratory ventilation should directly flow into the laboratory from

non-laboratory areas and out to the exterior of the building.  

b.        Ventilation for a fume hood (velocity) must be checked with a velometer by the science/chemistry teacher a minimum of every 3 months to ensure uniformity of air flow over the face of the hood and to detect any changes.  The operational level should be 70-100 linear feet per minute as measured by the velometer.

c.        Storage rooms should be ventilated by at least four changes of air per hour.   Isolate the chemical storage exhaust from the general building ventilation system.

  1. Post emergency telephone numbers in the chemical storage room.  Have some means of emergency communication in the laboratory, chemical storage room and prep area.
  2. In the event of an accident that requires the assistance of outside personnel, as soon as time allows, fill out an accident report describing the event in detail.  The accident report must be developed by the science/chemistry teacher and forwarded to the principal who will send a copy to the Chemical Hygiene Officer.  The Chemical Hygiene Officer must have already been notified of the accident.  
  3. All laboratories should have an eyewash fountain capable of treating both eyes continuously for 15 minutes with copious quantities of tempered aerated potable water.  Teach everyone how to use the eyewash fountain quickly in case of an emergency.  Eyewash effectiveness and operation should be inspected before every lab.  Federal regulation 29 CFR 1910.1450 requires that eyewash fountains be activated quarterly.  Promptly repair any eyewash that does not provide adequate water flow.  A repair order must be generated by the science/chemistry teacher and forwarded to the principal who will notify the maintenance department.
  4. Each laboratory area should be equipped with a safety shower or body drench.  The ANSI standard Z358.1-1990 requires that emergency showers be located no more than 10 seconds in time nor greater than 100 feet in distance from the hazard.  Water flow must be sufficient to drench the subject rapidly.  ANSI Z358.1-1990 requires a minimum flow of 30 gallons per minute of potable water.  When possible, tempered water should be used in safety showers.  Federal regulation 29 CFR 1910.1450 requires that safety showers be activated quarterly to ensure that they are working properly.  Promptly repair any shower or body drench that does not meet the water flow requirements of ANSI Z358.1.  A repair order must by generated by the science/chemistry teacher and forwarded to the principal who will notify the operations department.  
  5. Have appropriate types and sizes of fire extinguishers.  Triclass ABC fire extinguishers are appropriate for laboratories.  Fire extinguishers should be inspected by the operations department at least every three months.
  6. An approved eyewash station and fire blanket should be accessible within 8 seconds from any point in the laboratory.
  7. All chemical containers must have labels.  Read all labels carefully—the names of many chemicals look alike at first glance.
  8. A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) must be available for every hazardous chemical used in the laboratory.
  9. Be thoroughly familiar with the hazards and precautions for protection before using any chemical.  Study the precautionary label and review its contents before using any chemical substance
  10. Dispose of all chemicals properly.  All disposal procedures used should conform to state and local regulations.  Schools should use the Wayne County Public Schools Chemical Disposal Form to initiate any disposal of hazardous chemicals.
  11. Neutralizing chemicals, such as a spill kit, dry sand, kitty litter, and other spill control materials should be readily available.
  12. Do not use chipped, etched or cracked glassware.  Glassware which is chipped or scratched presents a serious breakage hazard when heated or handled.
  13. Do not drink from lab glassware or other lab vessels.
  14. No food in the laboratory.  Do not eat, drink, or chew gum in the laboratory.
  15. Do not apply cosmetics in areas where laboratory chemicals are present.
  16. Never pipet by mouth.
  17. Contact lens wearers should be provided with non-vented or indirect-vented chemical splash goggles in the laboratory.  
  18. Do not block fire exits.
  19. Have an alternative evacuation route in the event your primary route becomes blocked.  A copy of the school’s Emergency Evacuation Plan should be attached to each school’s Chemical Hygiene Plan.
  20. Practice your emergency plans.
  21. Keep all aisles clear.
  22. Do not run in the laboratory.
  23. Access to exits, emergency equipment, and master utility controls should never be blocked.
  24. Do not operate electrical equipment with wet hands.
  25. All accidents or near accidents (close calls) should be carefully analyzed with the results distributed to all who might benefit.
  26. Never perform unauthorized laboratory experiments.
  27. It is recommended that only science classes be held in science laboratories.  It is important that any teacher instructing in a lab setting be aware of the school’s Chemical Hygiene Plan and be responsible for its implementation.

        

C.        Personal Hygiene Guidelines

  1. Do not apply cosmetics or smoke, eat, chew, or drink in the laboratory.
  2. Do not pipet by mouth; always use a pipet bulb or other appropriate suction device.
  3. Wash hands thoroughly after any chemical exposure and before leaving the laboratory.
  4. Never smell chemicals directly; odors should be wafted only with teacher consent.
  5. Never bring foodstuffs, opened or closed into the lab, chemical prep, or storage room.  Foodstuffs should not be eaten if in a room with toxic materials.

D.       Protective Clothing Requirements

  1. Eye protection must be worn.  Chemical splash goggles must meet ANSI Z87.1 Standard.  Wear face shields when dealing with corrosive liquids, (i.e., full strength acids and bases).
  2. Wear gloves that offer protection for all hazards you may find in the lab.  Test for holes every time you wear your gloves.
  3. Always wear a full-length lab coat or a chemical-resistant apron.
  4. Wear low-heeled shoes.  Do not wear open-toed shoes or sandals of any kind.  Always wear socks in the laboratory.
  5. Do not wear shorts--wear long pants.
  6. Do not wear loose or balloon sleeves.
  7. Tie back long hair.
  8. Contact lens wearers should be provided with non-vented or indirect-vented chemical splash goggles in the laboratory.  
  9. Do not wear hanging jewelry.
  10. Do not wear a long or loose necktie.
  11. Do not wear an absorbent watch strap
  12. Inspect all protective safety equipment before use.  If defective, do not use.

        

  1. Housekeeping Rules

  1. Keep chemicals in the chemical prep and storage room.  If chemicals are moved to the classroom for lab, they must be returned to their proper storage location at the end of the day’s laboratory periods.
  2. Waste materials require proper containers and labels.
  3. Do not store items in the fume hood.  The storage of items in the fume hood is a fire hazard and decreases the efficiency of the fume hood.
  4. Label all chemicals with names and hazards.  Prepared solutions should be labeled with date, concentrations, and initials of preparer.
  5. Never block access to exits or emergency equipment.
  6. Clean up all spills properly and promptly.
  7. Work and floor surfaces should be cleaned regularly and kept free of clutter.

  1.      Spill and Accident Procedures

  1. Notify—Call for help.  Evacuate—Get everyone to a safe location.              Assemble—Organize the students and all workers.  Report—Fill out a detailed accident report after the emergency is over.
  2. Clean up spills immediately and thoroughly.  Follow approved spill cleanup procedures; spills should only be cleaned up by approved personnel.
  3. A bucket of dry sand should be available as a Class D fire extinguisher and to aid in providing traction on a slippery floor.
  4. Neutralizer for both acid and base spills should be available in the event of a chemical spill.

G.      Chemical Storage Rules and Procedures

  1. A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) must be available for every hazardous chemical in the science laboratory.  The chemistry teacher/science chair should put the MSDSs in notebooks labeled Current Science Chemicals and should store the notebooks in the front office and science classrooms.  The notebooks must be current at all times.
  2. The chemistry/science teacher must keep an updated inventory of all chemicals, their amounts and location.  Stored chemicals should be examined annually for replacement, deterioration and chemical integrity.  Your entire Chemical Hygiene Plan is based on the proper updated inventory always being available.  The science chair should keep a copy of each science teacher’s updated chemical inventory.  No hazardous chemical will be used or stored without a MSDS on file.
  3. Science teachers should label all chemical solutions made with the identity of the contents, date, concentration, hazard information, and the initials of the preparer.
  4. Date label all chemicals with the purchase date.  This will allow anyone to determine the age of a substance at a later date.
  5. Establish a separate and secure storage room for chemicals.
  6. Do not allow incoming shipments of chemicals to be opened and transported by school personnel other than qualified science teachers.  The special shipping containers can prove valuable for chemical storage.
  7. All chemicals should be stored in chemically compatible families (See MSDSs or publications such as the Flinn Chemical Catalog/Reference Manual for details).
  8. Store the minimum amount of chemicals needed.
  9. Store corrosives in appropriate corrosives cabinets.
  10. Flammable materials should be stored in an approved flammable storage cabinet.
  11. Do not store chemicals under a fume hood.
  12. If possible, keep certain items in the original shipping package, e.g., acids and bases in the special styrofoam cubes.
  13. Avoid storing chemicals on shelves above eye level.
  14. The entry to the chemical laboratory should be posted with the National Fire Protection Association diamond, which provides emergency information to fire fighters.
  15. Shelving above any work area, such as a sink, should be free of chemicals or other loose miscellany.
  16. Chemical storage cabinets should be secured to walls or floor to prevent tipping of entire sections.
  17. Shelves used to store chemicals should be equipped with lips.
  18. Chemicals should not be stored on the floor except in approved shipping containers.
  19. Storage rooms should be ventilated by at least four changes of air per hour.  Isolate the chemical storage exhaust from the general building ventilation system.
  20. Never store food in a laboratory refrigerator.
  21. Store chemicals in a separate, locked, dedicated storage area.
  22. Only authorized personnel are allowed in the chemical storage room.  
  23. Chemical exposure to heat or direct sunlight should be avoided.
  24. All science classrooms should be locked when left unattended.

1.  Handling Instructions for LP Gas

  1. Compressed gases should be handled as high-energy sources, and therefore, as potential explosives.
  2. Never lubricate, modify, force or tamper with a gas valve.
  3. The master valve for gas should be in the off position when gas is not required for the lab activity.

2.  Storage Requirements—Flammable Chemicals

  1. Store all flammables in a dedicated flammables cabinet.
  2. Store away from all sources of ignition.
  3. Store away from all oxidizers.
  4. Never store flammables in a refrigerator.
  5. Avoid storing any chemicals, especially flammable materials, in direct sunlight.

3.  Storage Requirements—Corrosive Materials Handling Instructions

  1. Store corrosives in appropriate corrosives cabinets.
  2. Working with corrosive materials requires special eyewear.  Wear a chemical splash face shield when handling corrosive materials.
  3. Inspect all shelf clips in your acid cabinet at least every three months to check for possible corrosion.  These shelf clips are the only thing between you and a collapsed shelf.  They require special attention

4.  Disposal of Chemicals

     

Schools should use the Wayne County Public Schools Chemical Disposal Inventory Form to initiate the disposal process.  A copy of the inventory form must by kept with the chemicals to be removed and a copy must be sent to the Chemical Hygiene Officer.  It is the school’s responsibility to maintain a Chemical Disposal Inventory at least annually.

H.             Procedure--Specific Safety Rules and Guidelines

                         (for hazardous chemicals)

     

1)  Use a fume hood when the permissible exposure limit for a chemical is less than         50 ppm as indicated on the chemical MSDS.

2)  Use allergens only under a fume hood.

3)  Handle toxic, corrosive, flammable and noxious chemicals under a fume hood.

4)  Do not expose flammable liquids to open flame, sparks, heat or any source of   ignition.

  1. Use of flammable solids (sodium, potassium, lithium, etc.) is prohibited.  
  2. Use extreme caution when handling finely divided (dust-like) material.  Finely                  divided materials may form explosive mixtures with air.
  3. Use of mercury for any educational purpose is prohibited.

 I.        Safety Equipment Inspection

                  There are many safety items necessary for compliance to the OSHA Laboratory Standard.  They include, but are not limited to:

  1. Goggles
  2. Ventilation Fans
  3. Fume Hoods
  4. Fire Extinguishers
  5. Eyewash Fountains
  6. Safety Showers

      One of the most important sections of the Laboratory Standard states that all safety equipment in the facility must always be in good operating condition.  While the Laboratory Standard requires some safety equipment and highly recommends other equipment, the standard is very clear on the point that if you have a piece of safety equipment, it must be functional at all times.  This statement applies to all safety equipment, required or recommended.

  1. Goggles must be clean and functional.  The science/chemistry teacher is responsible for cleaning and inspecting goggles and disposing of those that are not functional.
  2. Laboratory ventilation must meet the standard of eight air changes per hour and ventilation fans must be tested quarterly by the maintenance department.
  3. Fume hoods must be operational at the level of 70-100 linear feet per minute as measured by a velometer.  The science/chemistry teacher is responsible for maintaining this measurement process every three months.
  4. Fire extinguishers must be of the right type, Tri-class ABC, and they must always be properly inspected by the operations department every three months.
  5. Eyewash fountains must be functional and flushed at least quarterly by the science/chemistry teacher.
  6. Safety showers must be functional and activated at least quarterly by the science/chemistry teacher.

Any safety equipment failing inspection or reported to be out of order at any time must be repaired immediately.  Any repair order must be generated by the science/chemistry teacher and forwarded to the principal who will notify the maintenance department.

Employee Training

Systemwide Science Safety training sessions will be provided annually for high school science teachers.  The training will be coordinated by the Safety Consultant and/or the Lead Teacher for Science.  The training may include:

  1. Content and location of the Chemical Hygiene Plan and The Laboratory Standard.
  2. The proper use and location of all safety equipment.
  3. Reading, understanding, and locating chemical Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS).
  4. Safety updates on new equipment and materials will be provided as soon as possible after a new hazard is identified.

Exposure Evaluations

                       

   In the event of an overexposure, after the immediate event, the chemistry/science teacher must document all chemicals and circumstances involved in the overexposure.  This information can be used to change safety practices to further improve lab safety.   It is necessary to maintain these files and make them accessible to employees.

  Signs of overexposure are numerous; they may include:

  1. Accidental breakage of a hazardous material container.
  2. A skin rash or irritation occurring because of contact with a chemical.
  3. Caustic splash to eyes, face, or body.
  4. Symptoms such as nausea, dizziness and others.

             

  Medical Evaluations

               Medical consultation and examination will be available to employees when:

  1. Any sign or symptom of an overexposure to a chemical is present.
  2. There has been a spill or uncontrolled release of chemical fumes.

        The medical examinations dealing with the overexposure must be documented and other employees working under the same conditions must be notified.  All documentation must be

        kept on file and accessible by other employees working in this area.

Emergency Evacuation Plan

             

        Emergency evacuation procedures have been established at each school according to its Safe School Plan, which is mandated by state law.

        In the event evacuation is necessary, the science/chemistry teacher should notify the

        administration at the school.

        The evacuation procedures set forth in the school’s Safe School Plan will serve as the Emergency Evacuation Plan for the school’s Chemical Hygiene Plan.

Waivers

Waiver No:  1

Wavier Name:     Classroom Flexibility

Law, Regulation or Policy which Exemption is requested:  G.S. 115.c-105.21.B

How waiver will promote achievement of performance Goals:  Students will be provided

                continuous instruction from a highly qualified instructor to support

                provision for an education continuum.

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