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Harvard CUSD 50 Library Media Services

Library Media Curriculum

With Scope and Sequence

Information Literacy for Lifelong Learning

 Presented to the D50 School Board April 2017

Karen Kruckenberg, CUSD 50 Library Chair

Harvard High School

Library Media Specialist

Contributors:

Tim Yoder

Harvard Jr. High

Library Media Specialist

Maggie Binz

Jefferson School

Library Media Specialist

Nicole Clark

Crosby Elementary

Library Media Specialist

Lisa Tody

Harvard CUSD 50

Director of Technology


Section 1:  Introduction and Preliminary Documents

Section 2:  Encouraging Reading and the Love of Literature

Section 2 Instructional Timeline: Encouraging Reading and the Love of Literature

Section 2: Discussion and Guided Questions: Encouraging Reading and the Love of Literature

Section 3:  Orienting Students to Use the Library and Resources

Section 3 Instructional Timeline: Orienting Students to Use the Library and Its Resources

Section 3 Discussion and Guided Questions: Orienting Students to Use the Library and Its Resources

Section 4:  Teaching Students to Access Information

Section 4 Instructional Timeline:  Teaching Students to Access Information

Section 4 Discussion and Guided Questions:  Teaching Students to Access Information

Section 5:  Teaching Students to Identify and Evaluate Resources

Section 5 Instructional Timeline: Teaching Students to Identify and Evaluate Resources

Section 5 Discussion and Guided Questions: Teaching Students to Identify and Evaluate Resources

Section 6:  Teaching Students to Search for Information

Section 6 Instructional Timeline:  Teaching Students to Search for Information

Section 6 Discussion and Guided Questions:  Teaching Students to Search for Information

Section 7:  Teaching Students the Research Process

Section 7 Instructional Timeline:  Teaching Students the Research Process

Section 7 Discussion and Guided Questions -Teaching Students the Research Process

Section 8:  Teaching Students Social Responsibility

Section 8 Instructional Timeline: Teaching Students Social Responsibility

Section 8 Discussion and Guided Questions: Teaching Students Social Responsibility

Section 9:  Digital Citizenship and Teaching Students to be Safe Online

Section 9 Instructional Timeline: Digital Citizenship and Teaching Students to be Safe Online

Section 9 Discussion and Guided Questions: Digital Citizenship and Teaching Students to be Safe Online

Appendix A:  Parts of a Book

Appendix B: The D50 Research Model

Appendix C:  SWBAT Statements by School:

Appendix D:  Harvard CUSD K-12 SWBAT Statements

Appendix E:  References and Resources

Section 1:  Introduction and Preliminary Documents

The standards documents are very large PDFs and not included in this document, although they are referenced.  The standards may be accessed and read here:

I-SAIL Documents

AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner

In addition, CUSD 50 Library Media Centers have used The Illinois Study1 as a guiding document in creating this scope and sequence.  The library media centers’ collection development strategies, programs,  services, and facility design are all greatly influenced by the findings of The Illinois Study1.  The main findings of The Illinois Study are:

1 Lance, Keith Curry, Marcia J. Rodney, and Christine Hamilton-Pennell. (2005). Powerful Libraries Make Powerful Learners: The Illinois Study. 2005. Canon, IL: Illinois School Library Media Association.  http://www.islma.org/pdf/ILStudy2.pdf

2Sharka, Jane A. "Illinois Study Fact Sheet." ISLMA, 2005. Web. 25 Oct. 2016.

Foundations of D50 Library Media Curriculum

These will be considered the main headings upon which scaffolded lessons will be created for grades K-12:  

Literature Appreciation

Library Patronage

Research and Information Access

Digital Citizenship & Internet Safety

Literature Appreciation:  We are dedicated to encouraging reading and the love of literature by presenting literature in various genres and providing access to a wide range of literature and reading materials.  Libraries also support ELA Standards by defining literary terms, devices, elements, and cultivating an appreciation for literature among patrons. (ISLMA Standard #4)

Library Patronage:  21st Century libraries are places to Communicate, Collaborate, Create, and Consume.  Students will learn how to use libraries, library organization, expectations for responsible library patronage, and 21st Century library practices. (ISLMA Standard #3)

Research and Information Access:  It is a primary function of libraries to help patrons access and use information efficiently and effectively to inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge and participate ethically and productively as members of our democratic society. (ISLMA Standards #1, #3)

Digital Citizenship and Internet Safety: Defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use and information access, libraries play a crucial role in developing digital citizenship skills with students. (ISLMA Standard #5)

How this document is organized.

This scope and sequence – created by Harvard CUSD 50’s librarians – provides library media specialists with the roadmap needed to plan our students’ library experiences, thus ensuring students have exposure to the range of information literacy and library-specific skills needed for lifelong learning.

There are great differences among the grade levels in the school libraries – and the roles of the library media specialists – from school-to-school.  Both elementary have a full-time teacher-librarian. The Jr. High School and High School employ a full-time library media specialist.  Within the school District, there may be differences as to how various grade levels utilize the library. This is at the discretion of the school schedule and the principal.  However, we strive for consistent access and a wide reaching library program of services to all members of our learning community.  The library media centers and personnel are prepared to support students and their peers in the professional community by being educational leaders and innovators.

Individual lessons conforming to this sequence have been developed by the department, and continue to be developed by individual teacher-librarians and library media specialists. These are shared both in the departmental files and folders along with other documents pertaining to the function of the library media centers (D50 Cataloging Manual, Foundations of Library Curriculum, Standards, etc.)

This scope and sequence is based upon the four principle foundations upon which we have built our library curriculum.  Under each of the four foundations are subheadings. Each subheading category contains defining statements, which outline the expectations in each area.  There is also an instructional timeline,  which is a guide, not a list of requirements.  Each concept should be interpreted based upon the student's' grade level and integrated with the curriculum.  There also questions to be used as guides and discussion topics.


Section 2:  Encouraging Reading and the Love of Literature

  1. Library materials are arranged in a logical manner and may be retrieved using knowledge of that arrangement.
  2. Reading for pleasure or information has lifelong applications.
  3. Acquisition, evaluation and use of materials should be relevant to a specific need.
  4. Members of a learning community use information in an ethical and legal manner.
  5. Members of a learning community exhibit responsible behavior towards people and materials.
  6. Skills learned and mastered at the school library can be used at the public, academic and other libraries.

Section 2 Instructional Timeline: Encouraging Reading and the Love of Literature

(I = Introduce  R=Reinforce        E=Expand/Expect)

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Identify the characteristics of both fiction and nonfiction books.

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

Select appropriate fiction and nonfiction books for informational needs

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Select appropriate books for recreational and personal enjoyment

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Identify and appreciate the various styles of illustration.

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Identify the story elements (e.g., characters, setting and story sequence). Be able to retell the story.

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

-

-

-

-

Respond to a story by writing or drawing.

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

-

-

-

-

Apply and integrate comprehension skills to answer questions related to previously reviewed materials

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

-

-

-

-

Identify those persons and organizations involved in the creation of a book and in publishing process

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

Locate and read award-winning titles in the library.

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

Select, read, listen to and/or view literature for enjoyment

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Identify age-appropriate series

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

Identify age-appropriate authors

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

Section 2: Discussion and Guided Questions: Encouraging Reading and the Love of Literature

Building Skills and Procedural Knowledge – Students will be expected to:

Discussion and Guided Questions

ISLMA

Standards

AASL

Standards

Identify the characteristics of both fiction and nonfiction books.

- What are some of the characteristics of fiction or nonfiction literature?

2

I 2

Select appropriate fiction and nonfiction books for informational needs

What are some of the reasons for choosing to read a fiction or a non- fiction book?

2

II 5

Select appropriate books for recreational and personal enjoyment

What does genre mean? (Utilize the dictionary definition of the term, where genre is defined as a broad category of literature.)

What are various genres of literature? What genres exist within this library?

4

II 4

Identify and appreciate the various styles of illustration.

-What type of illustrations does this

  book contain?

-What do they look like to you? What

  does this style tell you?

4

 II 4,5,6

Identify the story elements (e.g., characters, setting and story sequence). Be able to retell the story.

What are story elements?

4

      I 2

Respond to a story by writing or drawing.

-What did the story make you feel or

  think about?

-What do you think happened before the

  story began or after it ended?

4

     I 3

Apply and integrate comprehension skills to answer questions related to previously reviewed materials

  • Can you explain what you just read?
  • What just happened in the story?
  • What do you think will happen next?

4

   

     I 2

Identify those persons and organizations involved in the creation of a book and in publishing process

  • What is a book?
  • What is the publishing process?
  • What is an author?
  • What is an illustrator?
  • What is an editor?

1

    I 3


Section 3:  Orienting Students to Use the Library and Resources

  1. Libraries are places where lifelong learning takes place.
  2. Librarians are professionals who are educated in the management and organization of
    resources, information and instruction.
  3. Librarians serve as technology leaders in the
    educational community by incorporating new and emerging information technologies.
  4. Librarians also serve to select books and information resources that will fulfill the many needs
    of the school learning community.
  5. Library materials are arranged in a logical manner and may be retrieved using knowledge of that
    Arrangement.
  6. Reading for pleasure or information has lifelong applications.

Section 3 Instructional Timeline: Orienting Students to Use the Library and Its Resources  

(I = Introduce  R=Reinforce        E=Expand/Expect)

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Identify, recognize and understand the role the librarian and other library staff.

I

I

R

R

I

R

I

R

E

E

E

E

E

Identify the purposes and functions of a library

I

I

R

R

I

R

I

R

E

I

R

E

E

Demonstrate appropriate behavior

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

- Select, borrow and return materials

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

- Demonstrate the appropriate care and handling of materials

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Locate, identify and utilize the parts of the library (if applicable)

-  Circulation desk

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

-  Destiny (OPAC)

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

-  Book return

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

-  Computers / computer lab

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

-  Fiction Chapter Books

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

-  Non-fiction and Reference collections

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

R

R

E

E

-  Fiction Picture books

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

-

-

-

-

-  Easy Reading books

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

-

-

-

-

-  Audio Books

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

-  Periodicals / Magazines

-

-

I

I

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R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

-  Biography

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

-  Library webpage and its resources

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

I

R

R

E

Section 3 Discussion and Guided Questions: Orienting Students to Use the Library and Its Resources

Building Skills and Procedural Knowledge – Students will be expected to:

Questions for Discussion

ISLMA

Standards

AASL

Standards

Identify the librarian and other library staff.

What is the name of the librarian?

1

    I 1,2,3

Identify the purposes and functions of a library

- What specific items can be found in a library?

1

   III 7,8,9

Recognize and understand the role of the librarian

- What is the role of the librarian within the school and within your learning experience?

1

    I 1,2,3

Demonstrate appropriate behavior

- What is appropriate library behavior?

1

III 7,8,9

Follow library rules  

 and procedures

What are the library rules and procedures

-What are the rules concerning circulation?

-What is the District’s Acceptable Internet Use Policy?

1

 III 7,8,9

 Select, borrow and  

 return materials

-How can materials be selected based on personal needs and interests?

-How long do books/materials circulate?

-How are books/materials renewed?

-Where are books/materials returned?

-What happens when books/materials are lost or damaged?

-What are library fines? Why are they assessed?

1

III 7,8,9

Demonstrate the  

 appropriate care and

 handling of materials

-How should library books be taken care of?

-How does appropriate book care

  influence the life of a book?

-How does taking care of books affect the

  school community?

-What happens if books are returned

  damaged?

1

III 7,8,9

Locate, identify and utilize the sections/resources of the library (if applicable)

- Circulation desk

OPAC (Destiny®)

Book return

Computers / computer lab

Videos

Fiction collection

  • Non-fiction collection
  • Reference collection
  • Picture books
  • Easy Reading books
  • Audio Books
  • Biography

  - Library resources

 - Where are specific items located in  

    the library?

 - How can we locate specific items?

 - How can knowing the organization of  

   the library help you to locate and use

   materials?

 - Why is it important to know where

   materials are located?

 - What is the purpose of the call number?

 -What is the purpose of the prefix  

   locator?

 -What resources are available linked via

   the library webpage?

   1

  1. 1
  2. 6

Locate and read award- winning titles in the library.

What are some of the book awards given to books for young people? Why? (i.e., Newbery, Caldecott, Coretta Scott King, Nebula, Hugo, YALSA, Michael Printz, Monarch, Bluestem, Rebecca Caudill, Abraham Lincoln)

[Note: See sites below for lists of awards  http://www.ala.org/ala/yalsa/booklistsaw ards/booklistsbook.htm]

4

    II 6

Select, read, listen to and/or view literature for enjoyment

-How do you select literature that

  promotes lifelong reading?

- How can you share and promote

  literature to others?

-How can you preview materials to

  meet your needs/desires? (skimming

  and scanning)

-How can reviews help you decide

 whether a book (or other resource) might

 be interesting, relevant or worth

 borrowing or purchasing?

4

   II 4

Identify age-appropriate series

What series are available for readers of your age and your interests?

4

     I 1

Identify age-appropriate authors

What authors have written literature that is appropriate for readers of your age and your interests?

4

     I 1

Section 4:  Teaching Students to Access Information

  1. Librarians are professionals who are educated in the management and organization of resources, information and instruction. Teacher-librarians serve as technology leaders in the educational community by incorporating new and emerging information technologies. Teacher-librarians also serve to select books and information resources that will fulfill the many needs of the school  learning-community.
  2. Library materials are arranged in a logical manner and may be retrieved using knowledge of that arrangement.
  3. Information may be organized using study, research, reference, and critical thinking skills to foster independent learning.
  4. Online databases exist to locate information. Skills mastered to search databases can be applied to online searches.
  5. Acquisition, evaluation, and use of materials should be relevant to a specific need.
  6. Technology may be used to enhance the acquisition of data and information.
  7. Information may be readily accessed and evaluated through print and electronic sources.
  8. Data and information from various resources must be analyzed, evaluated, synthesized and applied appropriately.
  9. Members of a learning community will understand that all information is not equally valid and that all data is not information.
  10. Authoritative information may help in making valuable and ethical choices.
  11.  Members of a learning community evaluate information critically for accuracy, relevancy, currency, and comprehensiveness and practice the ethical use of information and information technologies.
  12. Skills learned and mastered at the school library can be used at the public, academic and other libraries.

Section 4 Instructional Timeline:  Teaching Students to Access Information

(I = Introduce  R=Reinforce        E=Expand/Expect)

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Identify and locate the resources available from the school library

I

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

Identify how library resources are arranged in order to select materials

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Recognize and define the purpose of library classification systems, including Dewey Decimal and Library of Congress

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Use the OPAC (Destiny®) to find specific titles, authors and/or subject

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Locate relevant materials within the library utilizing the OPAC (Destiny®)

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

Explain how one item can be available in multiple formats (print, ebooks, or other media).

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Locate relevant data and information utilizing databases

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

- Identify the differences between a database and a search engine

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

- Understand that search engines utilize the concept of databases to secure results

-

-

-

I

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

- Define and utilize Boolean operators

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

Conduct a county-, regional- and statewide search for resources not available in the school library

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

E

E

E

Generate a list of relevant resources

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Section 4 Discussion and Guided Questions:  Teaching Students to Access Information

Building Skills and Procedural Knowledge – Students will be expected to:

Discussion and Guided Questions

ISLMA

Standards

AASL

Standards

Identify and locate the resources available from the school library

  • What different resources exist?
  • Where are they located?

1

I 1

Identify how library resources are arranged in order to select materials

  • Where are specific types of resources and collections located in our library?
  • How are books arranged on the library shelves?

1

I 1

Recognize and define the purpose of library classification systems, including Dewey Decimal and Library of Congress

  • What is a call number?
  • Why is it used?
  • What is the Dewey Decimal System?
  • What is the Library of Congress Classification System?
  • Why do libraries (usually) use one or the other? Why?
  • What problems can it cause if a library uses both classification systems?

1

I 1

Use the OPAC (Destiny®) to find specific titles, authors, and/or subject

  • How can you access resources to meet your personal and/or informational needs/ (OPAC (Destiny®), shelf browsing, online catalog,…)

1

I 3

Locate relevant materials within the library utilizing Destiny.

  • What is the OPAC (Destiny®)?
  • How can you search the OPAC (Destiny®) to find a book in the library?
  • What information in the OPAC (Destiny®) helps to locate library materials?
  • What are different ways that you can search the OPAC (Destiny®)? (i.e., author, title, subject, keyword, category…)
  • What is the Resource List feature of the OPAC (Destiny®)?
  • How would you further narrow a search using Boolean operators?
  • What is a card catalog? Why do some libraries still use them?

1

I 3

Explain how one item can be available in multiple formats (print, eBooks, or other media).

  • What are some of the formats in which an item might be available?
  • Will the library necessarily have multiple formats of the same title?
  • What is an eBook?
  • How do I read or access an eBook?
  • What other media are available?

1

II 5

Locate relevant data and information utilizing databases

Identify the differences between a database and a search engine

Understand that search engines utilize the concept of databases to secure results

Define and utilize Boolean operators

  • What is a search engine?
  • What is a database?
  • What is an electronic database?
  • What is an online database?
  • When using search engines are you actually using a database?
  • What other databases are available to you?
  • Why should you need/use them?
  • How would you further narrow a search using Boolean operators?

1

I 1

Conduct a search for resources not available in the school library (Access to Diggins, ERIC, etc.?)

  • What other resources are there?
  • What is the Diggins online catalog?
  • What can I use it for?
  • How can I access it?

1

I 1

Generate a list of relevant resources

  • What resources are relevant to your topic?
  • How do you know?
  • How should you list them?

1

I1

III8

Section 5:  Teaching Students to Identify and Evaluate Resources

  1. Library materials are arranged in a logical manner and may be retrieved using knowledge of that arrangement.
  2. Information may be organized using study, research, reference, and critical thinking skills to foster independent learning.
  3. Online databases exist to locate information. Skills mastered to search databases can be applied to online searches.
  4. Acquisition, evaluation and use of materials should be relevant to a specific need.
  5. Technology may be used to enhance the acquisition of data and information.
  6. Information may be readily accessed and evaluated through print and electronic sources.
  7. Data and information from various resources must be analyzed, evaluated, synthesized and applied appropriately.
  8. Members of a learning community will understand that all information is not equally valid and that all data is not information.
  9. Authoritative information may help in making valuable and ethical choices.
  10. Members of a learning community evaluate information critically for accuracy, relevancy, currency, and comprehensiveness and practice the ethical use of information and information technologies.
  11. Members of a learning community use information in an ethical and legal manner.
  12. Members of a learning community exhibit responsible behavior towards people and materials.
  13. Skills learned and mastered at the school library can be used at the public, academic and other libraries.

Section 5 Instructional Timeline: Teaching Students to Identify and Evaluate Resources

This document is a guide, not a list of requirements.  Each concept should be interpreted based upon the student's' grade level and integrated with the curriculum.

(I = Introduce  R=Reinforce        E=Expand/Expect)

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

- Learn the arrangement of various resources (alphabetical order, keywords, etc.)

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

- Select appropriate resources to satisfy a specific informational need

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

- Utilize the following parts of a book

----- title page

I

I

I

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

----- table of contents (TOC)

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

----- appendix

-

-

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-

-

I

I

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E

E

E

----- index

-

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I

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E

E

E

E

----- cross references

-

-

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-

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I

I

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R

E

----- bibliography / Works Cited

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

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R

R

E

E

E

----- glossary

-

-

I

I

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R

E

E

E

E

E

E

- Utilize the following parts of the text:

----- outlines

-

-

I

R

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R

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R

R

E

E

E

----- charts

-

I

I

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E

E

E

E

E

----- legends

-

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E

E

E

E

----- text boxes,

-

-

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E

E

E

E

E

----- picture captions,

-

-

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

- Use the formatting of text (Bold, Italics, etc) to locate information

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

- Identify or utilize the following types of reference resources:

----- almanacs

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

----- atlases

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

----- encyclopedias

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

----- thesauruses (a.k.a. thesauri)

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

----- dictionaries

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

- Generate a list of relevant resources for any given specific project

-

-

-

I

R

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

Select appropriate resources for specific informational needs

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Compare and contrast sources of information to select appropriate  resources for specific informational needs.

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Use a variety of electronic sources to access information ( subscription databases, search engines)

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Interpret information to evaluate relevancy and appropriateness of the sources, materials, etc.

-

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

Establish the authenticity, validity and the integrity of a source (electronic or print)

-

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

Evaluate a website – or other resource – for currency, relevance,accuracy,  authority, and position. (CRAAP)

-

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

Understand the organization/navigation of a web site/page for research purposes

-

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

Explore post-secondary life-skills

- Complete an online application

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

E

- Collect and compile career information

-

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

- Collect and compile job information

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

E

- Collect and compile information on post-secondary training, education, apprenticeship, etc.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

R

E

- Locate and compile scholarship information

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

E

- Locate examples and compile information for personal resume

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

E


Section 5 Discussion and Guided Questions: Teaching Students to Identify and Evaluate Resources

Building Skills and Procedural Knowledge – Students will be expected to:

Discussion and Guided Questions

ISLMA

Standards

AASL

Standards

Use various types of reference resources

  • What kinds of reference resources exist? (print and online)
  • What kind of information do you find in each?
  •  How is the data/information arranged? (e.g., alphabetical order, keywords, etc.)
  •  When and how do you use each of these?
  • title page, table of contents, index, appendix, glossary, bibliography

3

I 1,2,3

II 6

Select appropriate resources to satisfy a specific informational need

 -What types of resources will help you meet your informational needs?

  • How will “brainstorming” help you?
  • Where can you find this information?

2

I 1

Compare and contrast sources of information to select appropriate resources for specific informational needs.

How should you decide what source(s) to use? In what format(s)?

2

  1. 1
  2. 6

Use a variety of electronic sources to access information (subscription databases, search engines)

 -What databases are available to you?
-Which databases should you use for your project?
-How would you get information that you need from those databases and/or through these search engines?

1

I 3

Building Skills and Procedural Knowledge – Students will be expected to:

Discussion and Guided Questions

ISLMA

Standards

AASL

Standards

Interpret information to evaluate relevancy

and appropriateness of the sources, materials, etc.

What makes one piece of information more relevant to you – at any given point

– than another?

2

I 2

Establish the authenticity, validity and the integrity of a source (electronic or print)

 - Is the information current?

  • Is the source credible?

 - Who is responsible for the information?

  • What is bias?
  • Is there any observable bias?
  • Is there subrosa bias?
  • Does it provide information necessary?

2

I 2

Critically evaluate a website – or other resource.

- How do I evaluate a website? What are the five criteria used to evaluate information found on a website?

-- currency

-- relevance

-- accuracy

-- authority

-- position (bias)

2

I 2

Utilize the following parts of the text:

  • outlines
  • charts
  • legends
  • text boxes
  • picture captions

What are the benefits of each of the following?

  • outlines
  • charts
  • legends
  • text boxes
  • picture caption

4

I 3

Use the formatting of text to locate information:

  • bold
  • italics
  • tables
  • headings
  • subheadings

What do different text formats represent within a document?

  • bold
  • italics
  • tables
  • headings
  • subheadings

4

I 3

Understand the organization/navigation of a web site/page

 - What are several ways that a web page could be organized? (tree-hierarchy, using sidebar as sitemap…)

 - Where are the standard navigational buttons? (left and top navigation buttons or tabs?

  • What are pop-ups?

 - Are those ads and pop-ups that are visible on a page a part of the site? Or, are they using rented space?

2

I 2

Explore post-secondary life- skills

  • Complete an online application
  • Collect and compile career information

  • Collect and compile job information

  • Collect and compile information on post- secondary training, education, apprenticeship, etc.

  • Locate and compile scholarship information

  • Locate examples and compile information for personal resume

-Where can you find applications for the post-secondary opportunities of your choice?

-Where is information available within your library and online? Outside this library?

-Where can I find information on a full- time or part-time job?

-Where can you find information on post- secondary opportunities of your choice?

-Where can you find scholarship opportunities?

-What is the FAFSA? - Did you complete and submit it?

-Did you find resources to help you build your resume?

-Did you have it proofread by someone else?

3

I 1,2,3


Section 6:  Teaching Students to Search for Information

  1. Librarians are professionals who are educated in the management and organization of resources, information and instruction. Teacher-librarians serve as technology leaders in the educational community by incorporating new and emerging information technologies. Teacher-librarians also serve to select books and information resources that will fulfill the many needs of the school- learning-community.
  2. Library materials are arranged in a logical manner and may be retrieved using knowledge of that arrangement.
  3. Information may be organized using study, research, reference, and critical thinking skills to foster independent learning.
  4. Online databases exist to locate information. Skills mastered to search databases can be applied to online searches.
  5. Acquisition, evaluation and use of materials should be relevant to a specific need. Technology may be used to enhance the acquisition of data and information.
  6. Information may be readily accessed and evaluated through print and electronic sources.
  7. Data and information from various resources must be analyzed, evaluated, synthesized and applied appropriately.
  8. Members of a learning community will understand that all information is not equally valid and that all data is not information.
  9. Authoritative information may help in making valuable and ethical choices.
  10. Members of a learning community evaluate information critically for accuracy, relevancy, currency, and comprehensiveness and practice the ethical use of information and information technologies.
  11. Members of a learning community use information in an ethical and legal manner.
  12. Skills learned and mastered at the school library can be used at the public, academic and other libraries.

Section 6 Instructional Timeline:  Teaching Students to Search for Information

This document is a guide, not a list of requirements.  Each concept should be interpreted based upon the student's' grade level and integrated with the curriculum.

(I = Introduce  R=Reinforce        E=Expand/Expect)

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Define the question or subject

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Decide what information is needed to answer a given question or subject

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Construct retrieval strategies to answer the question

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

Identify, compare and contrast multiple search engines

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

Locate relevant information from appropriate sources

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

Conduct searches that differentiate among author, title, keyword and subject searches.

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

- Use the OPAC (Destiny®) catalog record to locate the item, title, call number and availability of the resource.

-

-

I

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

- Conduct various OPAC (Destiny®)

searches to obtain the best results dependent on the information problem (author, title, keyword, call number, subject, Power).

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

- Construct a search utilizing Boolean operators or truncation

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

Compile a list of appropriate sources using a Resource List in the OPAC (Destiny®)

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E


Section 6 Discussion and Guided Questions:  Teaching Students to Search for Information

Building Skills and Procedural Knowledge

Students will be expected to:

Discussion and Guided Questions

ISLMA

Standards

AASL

Standard

Define the question or subject

  • What are you looking for?

1

I 2

Decide what information is needed to answer a given question or subject

  • How much detail do you need?
  • What do you need it for?

1

I 2

Construct retrieval strategies to answer the question

  • Where might you find the information that you need?
  • How can I determine whether the information is located within those sources?
  • How can I retrieve that information?
  • Where else can I search?

1 and 2

I 2

Identify, compare and contrast multiple search engines

  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of the search strategies used by the different search engines? Why?

1 and 2

II 6

Conduct searches that differentiate between author, title, keyword and subject searches.

  1. Use the OPAC (Destiny®) catalog record to locate the item, title, call number and check the availability of the resource.
  2. Conduct various OPAC (Destiny®) searches to obtain the best results dependent on the information problem (author, title, keyword, call number, subject, Power).
  3. Construct a search utilizing Boolean operators or truncation
  • What databases and/or resources are available? Via your school portal? Elsewhere?
  • What is a keyword search?
  • How do you construct a keyword search?
  • How do you select the best resource from available databases?
  • What are Boolean operators? How should they be used?
  • What is truncation in search engines? When should it be used? (Using * to bring back variants of a word, or search a portion of a word)

1 and 2

I 2,3

II 6

Compile a list of appropriate sources using the Resource List feature within the OPAC (Destiny®).

  • What is Destiny’s Resource List feature? How can you use it to aid your search process?
  • From your list, how can you identify the most useful resources?

1, 2 and 3

III 8

Section 7:  Teaching Students the Research Process

  1. Librarians are professionals who are educated in the management and organization of resources, information and instruction. Teacher-librarians serve as technology leaders in the educational community by incorporating new and emerging information technologies. Teacher-librarians also serve to select books and information resources that will fulfill the many needs of the school- learning-community.
  2. Information may be organized using study, research, reference, and critical thinking skills to foster independent learning.
  3. Technology will enhance the acquisition of data and information, but must be used responsibly.
  4. Data and information from various resources must be analyzed, evaluated, synthesized and applied appropriately.
  5. Members of a learning community will understand that all information is not equal and all data is not information.
  6. Authoritative information may help in making valuable and ethical choices.
  7. Members of a learning community evaluate information critically for accuracy, relevancy, currency, and comprehensiveness and practice the ethical use of information and information technologies.
  8. Members of a learning community use information in an ethical and legal manner.
  9. Members of a learning community exhibit responsible behavior towards people and materials.
  10. See Appendix B:  The D50 “H” Research Model

Research Model H2.jpg

 

Section 7 Instructional Timeline:  Teaching Students the Research Process

(I = Introduce  R=Reinforce        E=Expand/Expect)

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Define research

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

Define the research process

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Define, develop and refine the question or project

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Analyze what is already known or experienced to form research questions, tentative thesis, theses, hypothesis, or hypotheses

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

Formulate thesis or hypothesis to guide research

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Develop or interpret the criteria by which your project will be evaluated (rubric)

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

Determine how much and what types of information are required to answer the question and/or complete the task

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Assess whether primary and/or secondary sources are needed

-

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

Determine what types and quantities of information are available for the project

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Plan project timeline

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Develop appropriate search strategies

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

Locate and explore resources

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Examine, select and reject individual resources

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Utilize skimming and scanning

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Extract and compile information

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

Utilize appropriate note-taking skills and/or recording technologies

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

Use appropriate tools to manipulate and process data and report results

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

Organize notes, data, and information

-

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

Record data needed for the Works Cited/bibliography or for parenthetical citations

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

Summarize and integrate all notes, data and information into own words

-

-

-

 I

I

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Create an outline

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

Prepare a working draft

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Edit and refine draft

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Shape information into an appropriate format for presentation/communication

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Create a Works Cited/bibliography

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Produce and present final product utilizing information from research

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Participate in the evaluation processes

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Engage in reflective self-evaluation

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Engage in peer evaluation

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

Section 7 Discussion and Guided Questions -Teaching Students the Research Process

Building Skills and Procedural Knowledge – Students will be expected to:

  Discussion and Guided Questions

ISLMA

Standards

AASL

Standards

Define research

-What is research?

(The collecting of information about a particular subject.)

1,2,3

II 6

Define the research process

-What is the research process?

- What are some examples of how to conduct research?

1

II 6

Define, develop and refine the question or topic

Analyze what is already known or experienced to form research questions, tentative thesis or tentative hypothesis

Formulate thesis or hypothesis to guide research

-What is your research question or topic?

-What is your purpose for conducting your research?

-What do you expect to learn from this?

1,3

I 1,2

II 6

-Why does this topic interest you, or what is the relevance to your assignment?

-What do you think you will discover from your research?

3

II 6

Develop or interpret the criteria by which your project will be evaluated (rubric)

  • What is a rubric?
  • How is a rubric developed? By whom?
  • What are the requirements of this rubric?

2

III 9

Determine how much and what types of information are required to answer the question and/or complete the task

- What is required to satisfy your

informational needs or the project’s

requirements?

- How much detail is needed to succeed?

- What specific formats or information are

required by your teacher?

I 1,2

Assess whether primary and/or secondary sources are needed

  • What are primary sources?
  • Why are primary sources important?
  • When, and how, can we use them?
  • What are secondary or tertiary sources?

1

I 2


Section 8:  Teaching Students Social Responsibility

  1. Authoritative information may help in making valuable and ethical choices.
  2. Members of a learning community evaluate information critically for accuracy, relevancy, currency, and comprehensiveness and practice the ethical use of information and information technologies.
  3. Members of a learning community use information in an ethical and legal manner.
  4. Members of a learning community exhibit responsible behavior towards people and materials.

Section 8 Instructional Timeline: Teaching Students Social Responsibility

(I = Introduce  R=Reinforce        E=Expand/Expect)

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Demonstrate the appropriate care and handling of materials.

I

I

I

R

R

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

Use information ethically

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Define and demonstrate respect for the concept of intellectual property (The ideas and works of others)

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Respect license agreements/copyright and refrain from copying software and other media (e.g., images, music, video, movies, stories, books… )

-

-

I

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Give appropriate credit for work(s) used (Refrain from plagiarizing information, graphics or ideas)

-

-

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Practice fair use guidelines while photocopying and scanning

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

Uses information technology responsibly

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Section 8 Discussion and Guided Questions: Teaching Students Social Responsibility

Building Skills and Procedural Knowledge – Students will be expected to:

Discussion and Guided Questions

ISLMA

Standards

AASL

Standards

Demonstrate the appropriate care and handling of materials.

Why does it matter how you treat a book?

4

I 1

III 8

Synthesize information and not plagiarize

What is plagiarism?

What are other forms of copying violations?

What are the consequences of plagiarism or copying violations?

How can you avoid plagiarism?

How can you avoid copying violations?

What is a citation?

    3

 III 8

Use information ethically

What does use information ethically mean? What are some examples?

Why should information be used ethically?

Who could be affected?

Could someone be physically or emotionally harmed?

Who could be hurt? How?

3

I 3

III 7,8

Define and demonstrate respect for the concept of intellectual property  (…The ideas and works of others)

What is intellectual property?

Why should you care?

Are there legal ramifications?

3

I 3

III 7,8

Respect license agreements/copyright and refrain from copying software and other media (music, video, movies, stories, books…)

What are license agreements?

Why should you care?

Are there legal ramifications?

3

I 3

III 7,8

Give appropriate credit for work(s) used (Refrain from plagiarizing information, graphics or ideas)

Have you given appropriate credit to your source?

Are there legal ramifications?

3

I 3

III 8

Practice fair use guidelines while photocopying and scanning

What is the District’s Fair Use Policy?

3

I 3

III 8

Uses information technology responsibly

What is the District’s Acceptable Use Policy?

What are the potential ramifications of misuse?

5

III 7,8

2 American Association of School Libraries, 1998


Section 9:  Digital Citizenship and Teaching Students to be Safe Online

  1. Librarians are professionals who are educated in the management and organization of resources, information and instruction. Teacher-librarians serve as technology leaders in the educational community by incorporating new and emerging information technologies. Teacher-librarians also serve to select books and information resources that will fulfill the many needs of the school- learning-community.
  2. Data and information from various resources must be analyzed, evaluated, synthesized and applied appropriately.
  3. Members of a learning community will understand that all information is not equally valid and that all data is not information.
  4. Authoritative information may help in making valuable and ethical choices.
  5. Members of a learning community evaluate information critically for accuracy, relevancy, currency, and comprehensiveness and practice the ethical use of information and information technologies.
  6. Members of a learning community use information in an ethical and legal manner.
  7. Members of a learning community exhibit responsible behavior towards people and materials.
  8. Skills learned and mastered at the school library can be used at the public, academic and other libraries.

Section 9 Instructional Timeline: Digital Citizenship and Teaching Students to be Safe Online

(I = Introduce  R=Reinforce        E=Expand/Expect)

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Abide by the District’s Acceptable Use Policy in all respects

-

I

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Use programs and Internet responsibly and ethically

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Observe Internet safety procedures, including safeguarding personal information

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Discuss and understand that irresponsible or naïve use of online resources might result in personal harm

I

I

I

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

E

E

E

Discuss and understand that personal information can/will stay on the Internet, and may be used against you when you are looking for a job

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

R

E

E

Identify ways of avoiding viruses and other malware

-

-

-

-

I

I

R

R

R

E

E

E

E

Section 9 Discussion and Guided Questions: Digital Citizenship and Teaching Students to be Safe Online

Building Skills and Procedural Knowledge – Students will be expected to:

Discussion and Guided Questions

ISLMA

Standards

AASL

Standards

Abide by the District’s Acceptable Use Policy in all respects

What is the District’s Acceptable Use Policy?

What are the potential consequences of misuse?

5

III 7,8

Use programs and Internet responsibly and ethically

What is cyber-bullying?

What is an online predator?

3 + 5

I 2

III 8

Observe Internet safety procedures, including safeguarding personal information

Discuss and understand that irresponsible or naïve use of online resources might result in personal harm

Discuss and understand that personal information can/will stay on the Internet, and may be used against you when you are looking for a job

What safety procedures can you follow?

What software is out there to help to protect you and your machine? (firewalls, antivirus software, antispyware software)

What is a cookie?

5

I 1

III 8

How?

What can I do to safeguard myself?

5

III 7,8

Why should you care that you (or someone else) posted personal information and/or photos of you on social media or elsewhere on the Internet?

5

III 7,8

Identify ways of avoiding viruses and other malware

What are different types of malware?

Why should you not click on pop-ups or open suspicious email?

5

III 7,8


Appendix A:  Parts of a Book

Students – age-appropriately – will be able to identify, define, and discuss the utility of each of the following:

  1. Appendix (appendices)
  2. Author
  3. Copyright date
  4. Covers, front and back (hard- versus soft- or paperback)
  5. Date(s) of publication
  6. Dedication
  7. Dewey decimal code or other relevant code
  8. Dust cover or plastic jacket
  9. End pages
  10. Foreword
  11. Frontispiece
  12. Glossary
  13. Half title page
  14. Illustrations
  15. Illustrator
  16. Index
  17. Other tables (figures, illustrations, etc.)
  18. Place of Publication
  19. Preface
  20. Publisher
  21. Spine
  22. Spine label
  23. Table of Contents
  24. Title
  25. Title page
  26. Verso
  27. Where extant: book pocket, charge card, date due slip
  28. Where extant: library barcode (versus publisher’s barcode)


Appendix B: The D50 Research Model

Research Model H2.jpg

Our model is comprised of 6 processes falling under two main headings:  preparation and production.  These are bridged by a deliberate process of thought and information synthesis.  Each process is further defined and examples provided here:  

Preparation Processes:

Explore

The researcher may have a task clearly defined for them by an instructor, or they may be given some freedom of selection as to the direction of the research goal. Either way, at the beginning of the research process, the researcher should spend some time determining how to define the task.  

Ask a question.

Develop a theory.

Define the scope of the project.

Get curious!

Task defined.

Pick a topic.

Select the novel to read.

Plan

There should be complete understanding of what the expectations are for the culmination of the research process and how to reach the goal of the process. The researcher should determine what sources will provide the information needed to complete the research and how those materials will be obtained.

Schedule your time.

Make an outline.

Create a flow chart or graphic organizer.

Gather

The researcher collects materials needed for the research.  Researcher should take pains to evaluate the sources for relevance, accuracy, currency, authority and the position from which the information comes.

For Internet research, researchers must apply a method of source evaluation (C.R.A.A.P. Test, 5 W’s of Website Evaluation or other.)

The citation process starts here with a making a note of sources and documenting all the relevant information for proper citations.  Direct quotes should be clearly identified in the gathering process.

Find possible sources of information.

Apply a chosen method of source evaluation.

Check out books.

Research database articles and copy the citations for each article.

Conduct interviews.

Read, take notes, record and keep track of your sources!

The bridge between the preparation processes and the production  processes can be described as the synthesis process in which the researcher combines elements from their research to form a new whole. In the research model, the “elements” are the findings from the materials gathered, the “new whole” is the conclusion(s)
you draw from those findings.  

Think and Evaluate

In this step, the student should be evaluating resources for accuracy and validity.  It is very important that the student take the time to synthesize, theorize, and draw conclusions from the information that they have gathered.  

This is the stage where the lightbulb goes on, the learning happens!

PRODUCTION PROCESSES:

Create and Cite

In the creation process, the researcher prepares his findings in a format that is required, or suitable for the project.  All sources of information used in the research process should be documented by putting all the relevant data into the proper citation format as required.  The creation process can be an additional learning experience in itself if the creation is a challenge to the researcher (video production, slideshow)

Write the paper.  

Create the poster or powerpoint.  

Record the video.  

Build the model.

Record the podcast.

Cite your sources and give credit according to required format.  

Share

Researchers share their findings with an audience, or presents the production in the required format for assessment by the instructor.

Turn in the paper.

Give the speech. Play the video for an audience.   Defend your thesis.

Reflect

This is an important step for the student to solidify what they have learned.  How effective was the process? Were results as expected? What could be done differently?  What new questions are raised by the research?

Discuss your grade with your instructor.

Critique your production.

Have a peer give you feedback.

Look at other student’s products.

In the best cases, new avenues of thought and new questions are considered by the researcher.

Appendix C:  SWBAT Statements by School:

When a student leaves Crosby Elementary at the end of 3rd grade, he/she will be able to:

Literature Appreciation:

Library Patronage:

Research and Information Access:

Digital Citizenship & Internet Safety:

Cultivate a love of reading and become a self-motivated reader.

·  

Select “Just Right” books during literature selection independently by using the five finger rule and identifying which section/shelf a call number is located in the library.

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

Protect personal information and apply stranger- danger knowledge when using the Internet.

Develop a knowledge of genres and literary elements.

Identify what type of Destiny search should be used when using the library catalog (i.e. keyword, title, author, series, subject).

Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).

Practice good online manners and recognize some communications can be hurtful to others.

Derive meaning from a variety of print including: informational texts, story books, poetry, and folktales.  

Categorize nonfiction topics by using the dewey decimal system (i.e. China- geography 900s, bird- science 500s, police officer- society- 300s, poetry- literature 800s.

 

Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photos) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

Compare and contrast information from two sources on the same topic.

When a student leaves Jefferson School, at the end of 5rd grade, he/she will be able to:

Literature Appreciation:

Library Patronage:

Research and Information Access:

Digital Citizenship & Internet Safety:

Be introduced to, read and vote for award nominated books appropriate for their grade level.

Articulate an information need and create a basic search strategy thinking of keywords, databases, and other print and nonprint sources available to them.

Deal with and avoid cyberbullying. (STOP, stay off of social media until they reach the terms of usage age, etc.)

Create a reading profile for themselves, understanding genres, authors, reading levels, etc. that they enjoy after being exposed to a variety of quality literature. SWBAT recommend books, series, and authors to their peers based on their own readings.

Carry over library skills learned at school to other settings such as Diggins. This includes performing online catalog searches, locating materials using the Dewey decimal system, utilizing online resources, placing a hold, requesting resources, and becoming a member of a library community.

Recognize that copyright laws protect original ideas and it is our duty to adhere to these laws. SWBAT to explain what can be copyrighted.

Explain why one source (print or nonprint) would be better to use than another. (evaluate with who, what, when, etc.)

Utilize information without plagiarizing, which includes taking notes, paraphrasing, and citing sources used throughout the research process.  

Maintain an age appropriate digital footprint and understand how it grows and can be viewed by others.

When a student leaves Harvard Jr High, at the end of 8rd grade, he/she will be able to:

Literature Appreciation:

Library Patronage:

Research and Information Access:

Digital Citizenship & Internet Safety:

Self-select reading materials appropriate for a specific purpose (i.e. fun reading, research project, persuasive essay)

Use Destiny to find appropriate books for a specific purpose

Organize and synthesize information from multiple sources

Download content only from ethical and reputable sources

Distinguish between different types and elements of literature

Locate any book in the library

Cite print and non-print sources in a properly formatted bibliography

Recognize and avoid inappropriate online content (advertising, malware, phishing, viruses, pornography, etc.)

Obtain information for personal interests and goals

Locate needed materials at other district libraries and Diggins and request that they be sent over via ILL.

Complete an age-appropriate research project using the Harvard CUSD #50 Research Model

Acknowledge the permanence of online content and understand that once something is posted, it is no longer controlled by the original poster.

Select an appropriate book of interest for personal enjoyment

Return books in a timely manner and/or renew books when needed for longer periods

Handle library materials correctly. Return books in the same condition as when checked out.


When a student graduates HHS, at the end of 12rd grade, he/she will be able to:

Literature Appreciation:

Library Patronage:

Research and Information Access:

Digital Citizenship & Internet Safety:

Enjoy access to a wide range of quality young adult and adult literature, and make reading choices based upon interests and personal preferences.

Understand that the library is an inclusive and safe environment where all are welcome and diversity is celebrated.  SWBAT openly participate in book discussions and reviews, vote for book choice awards, and recommend favored books to other patrons via Destiny or social media.

Perform sophisticated Internet searches using Boolean limiters,  truncation, and advanced Google search tools.

Create a positive and productive social media presence that will be viewed favorably by college recruiters or potential employers.

Choose freely from reading material curated to support high school curriculum and literature classes.

Make use of the Harvard Diggins and HHS Library to their full potential.  This means SWBAT log into and actively use subscription databases, return borrowed materials in a timely and responsible manner, and monitor their own patron status on Destiny.

Create proper citations for a wide variety of sources, correctly using MLA or APA format.  This also means students will be expected to cite images and materials used in non academic projects as well as formal papers.

Use a systematic procedure to critically evaluate information in order to make informed and intelligent judgements. (CRAAP Test,Schrock’s 5, etc)

Join a fandom?

Get a card from Diggins? (16 yrs)

Realize that copy paste is not writing? Recognize fake news?

Not illegally download music files?


Appendix D:  Harvard CUSD K-12 SWBAT Statements

Kindergarten students will be able to:

1. Choose a book of interest from a provided assortment

2. Listen to traditional folklore such as nursery rhymes and fairy tales

3. Identify literary elements such as character and setting

4. Respond to literature in participatory activities such as puppetry, finger plays, and drama

5. Engage with the work of various authors and illustrators

6. Enjoy award-winning literature

7. Begin to use print and nonprint materials

8. Appreciate reading for pleasure, for learning, and for finding answers

9. Use libraries, library staff, and library resources

First grade students will be able to:

1. Listen to or read traditional folklore such as fables and fairy tales

2. Listen to or read various types of fiction in picture books and nonfiction

3. Distinguish the differences between nonfiction and fiction books

4. Identify literary elements i.e. plot and theme

5. Practice literature response through basic discussion/storytelling/songs

6. Broaden awareness of the works of various authors and illustrators

7. Begin to develop awareness of award-winning literature

8. Read for pleasure and to find answers to questions with guidance

9. Put author picture cards in alphabetical order

10. Identify the “Cyber Five” rules when on the internet

Second grade students will be able to:

1. Select a “Just Right” book during literature selection

2. Listen to or read various folklore from different cultures

3. Read various types of fiction i.e. introduction to using chapter books

4. Recall that there are 10 main sections in Dewey decimal system

5. Recognize various literary elements within works focusing on point of view

6. Participate in guided discussions about literature to share opinions and responses  

7. Read for pleasure, seek answers, and explore topics of personal interest

8.  Identify literary awards i.e. Coretta Scott King, Caldecott

9.  Provide examples of personal information that needs to stay private when online

Third grade students will be able to:

1. Describe traits of characters in various fictional works

2. Listen to or read various cultural folklore i.e. myths and legends         

3. Participate in guided discussions about literature to share opinions  

4. Recognize various text structure within nonfiction and fictional works

5. Develop individual taste in series, author, and genre reading

6.  Appreciate information presented creatively in various formats

7. Categorize nonfiction topics according to the 10 main dewey decimal sections

8. List strategies for dealing with cyberbullies

9. Define a digital footprint and how it is impacted by what they post online

10. Explain importance of not talking to strangers online (they could be pretending to be someone else)

11. Complete an age-appropriate research project using the Harvard CUSD#50 research model.

Fourth grade students will be able to:

1. Understand how to deal with cyberbullying by using the STOP method.

2. Understand what is safe to post online and what is private information.

3. Explain why elementary students should not be participating in social media. (Terms of Use)

4. Give credit to sources (both online and print) when completing research, presentations, etc. by naming the website or title.

5. Search for and locate information from our subscription databases and our online catalog.

6. Explain the various sections of our library and why specific books are housed in each.

7. Locate books by call number. (author’s names alphabetically or Dewey decimal)

8. Check out books that are appropriate for themselves, considering length of book, reading level, and topic.

9. Understand that libraries provide services beyond book checkouts. (computer usage, ebooks, story time, projects, collaboration space, resources, etc. )

10. Read a variety of texts including award nominees, nonfiction, fiction genres, and poetry for information and for pleasure.

Fifth grade students will be able to:

1. Independently use reference materials.

2. Give book recommendations to peers, providing author name, series title, or a book title.

3. Articulate an information need and create a basic search strategy.

4. Use primary and secondary resources.

5. Locate materials and information using advanced features of library catalog.

6. Be able to explain the difference between plagiarism and copyright and how they affect people.

7. Create a bibliography following MLA format for books, databases, and other websites.

8. Carry over knowledge of their school library to other libraries(Jr. High and Diggins, etc. ) being able to locate print and online materials, utilize the online catalog, using the librarian as a resource, and appropriate behaviors.  

9. Paraphrase and use note taking skills while gathering information.

10. Evaluate sources (print and online) to find the most current, accurate, appropriate ones for their purpose and age group.

11.Complete an age-appropriate research project using the Harvard CUSD#50 research model.

Sixth grade students will be able to:

1. Locate materials on library shelves using call numbers.

2. Use print and electronic sources to gather information.

3. Understand scope, depth, and potential usefulness of various available information sources.

4. Identify rationale for using specific resources.

5. Reflect on and refine personal searches.

6. Recognize the point of view or opinion of an author.

7. Organize information from multiple sources in a logical sequence using a graphic organizer.

8. Distinguish various literary elements within works.

Seventh grade students will be able to:

1. Choose broader or narrower keywords to refine search results.

2. Practice locating information within a source using navigational tools (i.e. table of contents, glossary, index, etc.).

3. Select an appropriate format for communicating information.

4. Avoid plagiarism by observing copyright guidelines.

5. Cite print and non-print sources correctly in a properly formatted bibliography.

6. Identify genres of various print sources.

7. Participate in and/or lead discussions about literature to share opinions and responses.

8. Practice locating ethical and reputable sources for downloading digital content.

Eighth grade students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate skill in using electronic catalogs and databases.

2. Determine if a source has a bias.

3. Create a product using technology when appropriate.

4. Present, perform, share, and evaluate the results of information searches in a new form.

5. Demonstrate mastery of literary elements.

6. Complete an age-appropriate research project using the Harvard CUSD#50 research model.

7. Organize and synthesize information from various sources.

Grade 9-10 students will be able to:

  1. Log in to databases appropriately for research purposes:  World Book, Issues and Controversies, Biographies Online, Country Reports, TumbleBookCloud.
  1. Use Destiny as a self sufficient patron to monitor due dates for borrowed resources, put books on hold, locate books they want to check out for IR books.
  2. Transition to Young Adult literature with more mature themes in literature.
  3. Use literature as a way to understand diversity and learn acceptance of others.
  4. Explore a wide variety of topics in nonfiction and fiction that expand knowledge and understanding of the world around them.
  5. Log in and understand how TurnItIn checks for originality in writing, and understand the concept of academic honesty.
  6. Select, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  7. Take responsibility for Chromebooks or other technology and report problems appropriately to the library.
  8. Use a wide variety of resources to accomplish academic and personal goals.
  9. Evaluate and give critical analysis of information from many sources (print, digital, audio visual)
  10. Complete an age-appropriate research project using the Harvard CUSD#50 research model.

Grade 11-12 students will be able to:

  1. Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance  (primary sources), including how they address related themes and concepts, and understand how secondary sources can clarify and give context to primary sources.
  2. Read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  3. Perform under expected standards of academic honesty and integrity.
  4. Approach YA and adult literature with a critical understanding and an appreciation of a wide variety of literature and fiction.
  5. Use literature to understand complex issues and concerns that are universal, as well as use literature to develop understanding and sympathy for others.
  6. Recognize bias in reporting, and identify “fake news”.
  7. Use a systematic procedure to critically evaluate information in order to make informed and intelligent judgements.
  8. Use Issues and Controversies and other resources to research diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
  9. Create a positive and productive social media presence that will be viewed favorably by college recruiters or potential employers.
  10. Perform sophisticated Internet searches using Boolean limiters,  truncation, and advanced Google search tools.
  11. Complete an age-appropriate research project using the Harvard CUSD#50 research model.

Appendix E:  References and Resources

Illinois School Library Media Association

Powerful Libraries Make Powerful Learners: The Illinois Study.

American Library Association/American Association of School Libraries

Pittsburgh Public Schools Library Services K-12 Scope and Sequence

Core Standards:  State Standards Initiative

ISTE:  Standards for Students 2016