Assignment 3: A Three-Year Classroom Technology Plan                                

A Three-Year Classroom Technology Plan

Submitted by Allan Carter

A Three-Year Classroom Technology Plan

submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements

for the Diploma in Education (Technology)

Cape Breton University

Date: August 30, 2013

Introduction

The integration of technology in the learning environment can help to create opportunities where students can become explorers as they reflect on their own learning and become producers of knowledge (Meaningful, Engaged Learning). The courses involved in this technology plan blend well to this constructivist approach to learning. The roles of the students with the technology integration in these courses can be described as explorers, cognitive apprentices and producers of knowledge (Learning Indicators).  

It should be noted that some of this planning has been considered before and some partial integration has already occurred. However, the recent acquisition of new computer equipment has allowed for this integration to be taken to a new level. The experiences from previous technology integration along with new or updated learning outcomes for some of the courses and the acquisition of new technology, allow for major revisions and new implementations.

Despite new technology and preexisting technology, the technology plan still has to address barriers. There is no one to one ratio of mobile computer systems at the school, and there is only one lab that could possibly address a number of the learning activities included in the plan. The school wireless connectivity has allowed for some of these barriers to be effectively addressed as discussed by Hew and Brush (2006). The availability of seven new computer systems in the classroom that can handle more demanding multimedia production tasks allows for the teacher to schedule working groups as they complete projects. Moreover, the availability of cheaper netbooks that students can also use in the classroom allows for students to complete preliminary research as well as online and classroom collaboration.

Finally, the pace at which technology changes is one of the biggest challenges when planning integration of technology in learning environments. Strong (2007) explores this challenge and suggests completing small trial investments of technology and to consider it fortunate if a technology plan can be sustained for two to three years. The trial investments suggested by Strong have played a big part as the preface to the development of this plan. This plan will allow the new technology, which was acquired as a result of those trial investments, to be used by several classes in an evolution of technology implementation that will, hopefully, create a rich and dynamic learning experience (Boss, 2011).

Classroom Vision Statement

        

        Planning for the integration of technology in the classroom can possibly lead to paralysis by analysis. The abundant availability of many open source and free software applications, along with cheaper technology and many students armed with their own technology, can be a mixed blessing for the classroom teacher. However, a well-structured classroom vision statement can help a teacher to stay on track and remember “the instructional value of technology lies in the way that is it used and the activity structure that surrounds it, rather than in the hardware or software itself” (McNabb, Valdez, Nowakowski, & Hawkes, 1999).

        The classroom vision statement below was created while considering the vision statement of the school as well as the District and the provincial Department. It addresses 21st century skills as outlined in the Department’s document and is “student-centric,” focusing on “learning by ‘doing,’ and includes very high performance expectations” (Technology Planning: The Educator’s Guide).

To create and sustain a learner-centred environment where each student feels their talents, skills and input are welcomed and encouraged as they have opportunities to work collaboratively and are enriched and motivated through the equitable access to technology that will enable them to:

Through the learning environment and the experiences the students create, they will continue to understand and appreciate the importance of lifelong learning while developing skills and gaining knowledge that they can apply throughout their lives. Such skills include:

(Skills list from: NB3-21C: Creating a 21st Century Learning Model of Public Education)

Goals and Objectives Framework for Technology Interventions

        Below are the goals and objectives that are aligned with the general and specific curriculum outcomes, technology required and interventions, and required skills in the four courses involved in the classroom technology integration. Ultimately, as cited in the introduction to this plan, the purpose of these goals and objectives are to provide opportunities for students to be explorers, cognitive apprentices and producers of knowledge (Learning Indicators).

        Goal: Students will use technology to engage in learning as global citizens and have opportunities to connect with each other online and then with other people, including experts on issues they are studying.

Note: Please refer to Appendix 1 for examples, specifically under Ancient and Medieval History 10 and Journalism 12, that relate to the above objectives on the general and specific curriculum outcome(s), technology required and intervention(s), and required skills.

        Goal: Students will have learning opportunities that allow them to engage in authentic problem solving where they must work online collaboratively to plan and manage their research and the results using Internet resources.

Note: Please refer to Appendix 1 for examples in all courses that relate to the above objectives on the general and specific curriculum outcome(s), technology required and intervention(s), and required skills.

        Goal: Students will explore and become familiar with different technologies and through collaborative investigation be able to determine which technology fits best for the desired result in their learning outcome as they address real world situations/problems.  

Note: Please refer to Appendix 1 for examples in all courses that relate to the above objectives on the general and specific curriculum outcome(s), technology required and intervention(s), and required skills.

        Goal: Students will be challenged to consider their digital footprint and how they act as digital citizens. They will also research media literacy, responsible use on the Internet and, where applicable, create guidelines or a code of ethics specific to their course outcomes.

Note: Please refer to Appendix 1 for examples in Broad-Based Technology 9, Journalism 120 and Media Studies 120 that relate to the above objectives on the general and specific curriculum outcome(s), technology required and intervention(s), and required skills.

        Goal: Students will be expected to develop the necessary skills so they can be involved in identifying and solving common hardware and/or software issues that can occur in everyday use. This will include students becoming familiar with not only computers, but also other common technologies, such as cameras, video cameras, digital microphones, along with various software packages and Web 2.0 applications.

Note: Please refer to Appendix 1 for examples in all courses that relate to the above objectives on the general and specific curriculum outcome(s), technology required and intervention(s), and required skills.

        Goal: Implement the TeackerKit software for continuous assessment and behaviour tracking updates and the ability to provide timely feedback.

Note: Please refer to Appendix 1 for examples in “Integrating Technology into the Classroom Administration” that relate to the above objectives on the general and specific curriculum outcome(s), technology required and intervention(s), and required skills.

        Goal: Implement an online collaborative tracking system to track students in their work assignments and to ensure that deadlines are being met.  

Note: Please refer to Appendix 1 for examples in “Integrating Technology into the Classroom Administration” that relate to the above objectives on the general and specific curriculum outcome(s), technology required and intervention(s), and required skills.

Infrastructure Requirements

        Hardware and software choices for technology integration in the classroom should be guided by a needs assessment of the learning environment and the technology must be matched with the needs of the learners (McNabb et al., 1999).  The current infrastructure at the school includes a number of portable computer systems that allows two students to be assigned one netbook or notebook system. While not ideal, it has allowed for greater integration of technology in the classroom, avoiding timetable conflicts with computers labs and additional wasted time travelling to a computer lab (Hew & Brush, 2006).

        Student feedback on the use of the portable computers, particularly the netbook units, has shown discontent with sharing the systems and also disappointment and frustration with the ability and performance of the computers (slow processing speeds and small screens). Some of the findings from student feedback can be viewed at: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1eAOJ1x4OLrVcg5X2ik4kl-qqd7JtnlvSOTaYPaHhMNE/edit?usp=sharing

        It was also observed that students preferred to use the one MacBook Pro system for more demanding work, such as video production and photo editing. This prompted the school to seek funds and obtain grant money to purchase more MacBook Pros and one iMac system, along with other related equipment.

        As discussed by Hew and Brush (2006) referring to Sandholtz et al., (1997) and Tearle, (2004), “having a shared vision of learning and teaching can serve as a driving force for overcoming leadership barriers to technology use.” Additionally, when considering the technology infrastructure and its integration, teachers “should be involved in the decision-making” because teachers are part of the driving force for successful technology integration in the classroom (Hew & Brush, 2006). The gathering of student feedback by teachers as well as their observations on how students were using the existing technology is one example of how teachers play a vital role when considering technology infrastructure and integration.

        The chart below reflects the current infrastructure and what is required for this classroom technology plan. Please note it does not take it consideration all the school’s infrastructure, but considers what infrastructure (available and required) would be necessary for one classroom.

 Available Technology

Required Technology

Hardwired and Wireless Internet Connectivity

GoPro Hero Camera

Six MacBook Pro Computers

Six Basis Digital Cameras

One iMac Desktop Computer

Six Raspberry Pi+ Advanced Bundle

One Classroom Desktop Computer

Six HDMI Displays

One SmartBoard/Audio System

Six HDMI Cables

25 Dell Netbooks/HP Notebooks

Adobe Photoshop Elements

Two Canon HD Video Cameras

Teacherkit.net

Two Tripods

Videoblocks.com Subscription

Two Microphones

Online Assignment Tracking System

25 Headphones

Two Canon SLR Cameras

One Zoom H2N Handy Digital Recorder

Green Screen and Lighting

One iPad

Google Drive

Weebly.com

Prezi.com

Blogger.com

Audacity

iMovie

iPhoto

GarageBand

MovieMaker

MS Office

Twitter

Smart Notebook

Professional Development and Technology Integration

Professional development to support and enhance a teacher’s ability to successfully integrate technology in a learning environment challenges many of the traditional notions on how professionals receive continual education in their occupational fields. It is not enough to provide general professional development opportunities. Just as educators are expected to provide personalized learning for their students, the support systems for educators must deliver professional development that is relevant and meaningful to how teachers want to transform their classrooms and meet the specific needs of their students.  

Hew and Brush (2006) cite Schrum (1999) and Granger et al. (2002) who discuss the idea of ‘‘just-in-time’’ professional development, rather than ‘‘just-in-case’’ professional development. Further citing Granger et al. (2002), Hew and Brush (2006) state that this type of professional development is more likely to be embraced and accepted by teachers “because it addresses the teachers’ immediate concerns and is thus consistent with teachers’ needs.” This type of professional development delivery as “a need-to-know approach to constructing technology knowledge and skills can transform teachers into active knowledge builders possessing substantial autonomy regarding the specific skills required,” state Hew and Brush (2006), referring to Granger et al. (2002).         Too much disconnect can occur when the planning and deployment of professional development is left to only one or two stakeholders. Collaboration is key when it comes to professional development and technology integration. Kitchenum (2009) stresses that schools need to view professional development as a “commonly-shared goal” and that “the educational stakeholders have opportunities to discuss their own and others’ best practices.”

Traditional professional development deployment cannot meet the needs of teachers anymore. Dynamic, relevant and successful professional development must be conducted as an “ongoing process, not a one-shot approach” (Rodriguez & Knuth, 2000). Moreover, the challenge to plan and deploy successful professional development for teachers is lessened when one considers the power of online collaboration and Internet resources. Teachers can stay current in the latest research findings, participate in online professional development and collaborate and share resources with their peers (McNabb, Valdez, Nowakowski, & Hawkes, 1999).

Aside from the delivery format of professional development for technology integration, there are other components that must be present. Rodriguez and Knuth (2000) discuss these components. Some of these components may seem obvious and basic, but there is always a risk that the stakeholders will overlook some of them. Creating and maintaining a holistic framework for professional development in technology integration should include: “A connection to student learning, hands-on technology use, variety of learning experiences, curriculum-specific applications, new roles for teachers, collegial learning, active participation of teachers, ongoing process, sufficient time, technical assistance and support, administrative support, adequate resources, continuous funding, and built-in evaluation” (Rodriguez and Knuth, 2000).

The integration of technology in a learning environment is dependent on the effectiveness and success of professional development. As aforementioned, understanding how students learn and maintaining a focus on curriculum objectives are vital components in the integration of technology. When technology is effectively integrated in a learning setting, it can “enliven teaching and learning by facilitating the incorporation of real-world problems into the curriculum” and “can help make a learning environment more learner-centered” (Dexter, 2004). Dexter (2002) further argues that “educational technology does not possess inherent instructional value: a teacher designs into the instruction any value that technology adds to the teaching and learning process.” Dexter reinforces the importance of collaboration and involving all stakeholders when she states that “the conditions for effective technology integration are enhanced further” when teachers work together and technology use is connected to larger goals that encompass beyond the school to the district and other levels.

For most teachers the question is not when will they integrate technology in their learning environments? Instead, the question is how they should integrate it in ways that will enhance the learning environment? Writer and Instructional Designer Dianne Rees, in her blog article “Why we can’t ignore social media,” observes that social media is a “reflection of now nearly ubiquitous technology...that’s natural to us.” Social media along with mobile technology have become a staple of most people’s daily use. So it is not surprising that many learners expect to see it as an essential element in their learning experiences.

Effective technology integration has the power to transform the learning experience for both the teacher and the student. Williams, Atkinson, Cate, and O'Hair (2008) observed substantial student motivation when students used technology and collaboration in their own learning processes. Additionally, both collaboration and technology integration “improved students’ standardized test results, class performance, discipline, attendance, and dropout rates” (Williams et al., 2008). However, none of this happens in isolation, and when integrating technology for learning experience enhancements, it is imperative that educators and all stakeholders have a shared vision on where they are and where they want to go. Only through the inclusion of the essential components for professional development, such as collaboration, support, continuous learning and skills development, will effective technology integration become a reality in the learning environment.

Professional Development: A Self-Assessment Instrument and

Educational Technology Integration Standards

It is important to consider standards when determining where educators are and where they want to go in regard to technology integration. Over the past few decades, standards for technology integration have undergone many revisions as technology changes and how we interact with technology evolves. The idea of core technology competencies and skills seems somewhat antiquated when many people have a mobile device attached to them that has more computing power than most older desktop computers. Additionally, many of these mobile devices have integrated various computer uses, such as digital photo capture, digital voice recording, and Internet access.  

While we may consider if someone can connect, configure and use peripherals, it is unlikely we would be concerned if someone can use email or CD-ROMs (Knuth, Amenta-Shin, & Ciesmier, 1999). Further, as the consumer world continues to demand user-friendly technology, teachers will most likely discover the learning curve will grow increasingly smaller when using and implementing new technologies.  In fact, “technology that is not easily accessed and implemented will not be used. Teachers will return to more traditional ways of teaching if the problems they encounter cannot be solved quickly and efficiently” (Rodriguez & Knuth, 2000).

While being comfortable with using technology is important, the focus on standards centers on how teachers embrace the use of technology to transform the learning experience in a 21st century learning environment. “Standards have now been developed that explicitly define the technology skills that teachers need to be prepared to teach in a 21st century school” (Dexter, 2004). In 2008, the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) updated the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS•T) and these standards evaluate “the skills and knowledge educators need to teach, work, and learn in an increasingly connected global and digital society” (iste.org). These standards encourage teachers to “possess the skills and behaviours of digital age professionals” (iste.org). Additionally, the standards are set in the philosophy that teachers are co-learners with both students and their colleagues, and not just in the classroom, but also around the world. Indeed, educators have observed that the integration of technology in their classrooms gave them the opportunity “to become learners with the students” (Williams et al., 2008).

The five standards for teachers by NETS•T were used in the creation of the Technology Self- Assessment Tool for Classroom Teachers. Referring to the NETS•T rubric, the self-assessment tool uses the four “transformative” descriptors for each standard (refer to Appendix C). If a teacher feels they are at the transformative performance stage, then they will select “always” which is also given a numerical value of four (4). The teacher is instructed to refer to the rubric as they complete the self-assessment to review the other performance indicators (proficient, developing and beginning). A link to the rubric is provided in the online assessment tool for easy reference. If they feel they fall more into proficient versus transformative, then they can choose “usually” for a numerical value of three (3). The same applies to the other two performance indicators with values of two (2) “sometimes” and one (1) “never.”  The numerical values allow the teacher to calculate which performance indicator category he/she falls into for each standard (with a possible total of 16 for transformative). Ideally, the teacher wants to work toward transformative, so he/she can review the descriptors and determine which ones should become the focus for professional development within each standard.  

One feature built into the self-assessment tool is the invitation for teachers to share any best practices. As teachers complete the self-assessment, they will need to reflect on their teaching practices. At the end of each standard, they are asked to mention any teaching practices that they considered when reading statements where they answered “always, usually, sometimes.” This feature was included because it is likely that teachers would be completing a self-assessment in a collaborative environment and the sharing of best practices and modeling are key components to successful professional development and technology integration (Rodriguez & Knuth, 2000; Kitchenham, 2009; McNabb et al., 1999). Furthermore, reflecting on best practices provides the opportunity for teachers to consider what they already know about what works to create effective integration into the curriculum, as they consider what they need to know to continue to provide an enhanced learning environment in their classrooms.

The self-assessment tool was designed to be used online and can be accessed for viewing at: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1WifGmGeGklgzJVSgINZPjKOAShRff_YZbkKAf8E0iJc/viewform

Professional Development Personal Profile:

Analysis of Self-Assessment Result

Under the first NETS•T standard, “Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity,” the final score was 12/16 and this would place me mainly in the “proficient” level for this standard. One area of concern in building on this standard is my own knowledge and experience with technology and the curriculum objectives for Broad-Based Technology 9. Appendix D provides the scores from the self-assessment for this standard, as well as the other five standards discussed in this section.

One of the curriculum objectives is to “independently apply a design process model which should include, a design brief, investigate/research, generate options, select best option, design and produce (develop solution), evaluate and articulate.Currently, there is a strong movement in education to teach digital literacy. Author Douglas Rushkoff argues that young people should learn to code to understand the bias of digital technology. He states "programming is the new literacy of the digital age” and the question becomes whether "we direct technology, or do we let ourselves be directed by it and those who have mastered it?" (Rushkoff, 2011). If we accept that programming is literacy, than educators have an obligation to become literate and to teach and encourage students to understand how it works and the implications that come with that knowledge.

I think a course like Broad-Based Technology provides the learning space for such opportunities, and digital literacy instruction aligns with the current curriculum objectives. However, I am not a programmer, and while I have found some learning materials that would help students explore programming, I require more experience and knowledge in this area. Without the experience and knowledge, I do not see myself moving from proficient to transformative in this standard, particularly in the Broad-Based Technology 9 course.

There are online resources and communities available to help teachers who want to create learning opportunities where students can develop their digital literacy skills. The professional development I require for this standard would most likely come from “online learning communities” where I can “stay abreast of the latest research information, changing pedagogical practices, and professional events” (McNabb et al., 1999).

The final score for the second standard, “Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments,” was 11/16. This would place me in the “developing” performance indicator. There are two major concerns in regard to professional development surrounding this standard. One is assessment and the other is developing personalized learning experiences for students.

I require more understanding in engaging students in developing and analyzing assessments. I also need to integrate measures in understanding student learning styles, work strategies, and abilities. Various courses I have recently taken have addressed some of these concerns in regard to knowledge and resources, but I need to do further research in implementation. Currently, the New Brunswick Department of Education and the districts are involved in developing Universal Design of Learning experiences for our students. Some of the concerns around assessment and personalized learning experiences could be addressed with “collaborative teaching groups,” since this is a professional development initiative that is a “commonly-shared goal” where opportunities to discuss “best practices” could arise (Kitchenham, 2009).

The third standard, “Model Digital-Age Work and Learning,” proved to have the lowest result of the five standards - the final score was 10/16. Like the second standard, my performance indicator for the third standard is “developing.” One of the reasons for the low score has to do with providing opportunities for students to engage in learning as global citizens where they can engage and interact with other cultures while also producing work for a global audience in mind.  

The implementation of social networking experiences, while connecting my classrooms to cross cultural opportunities, would also address some of the concerns under this standard. In fact, this is one area that my technology plan does partly address in regard to using Twitter in Ancient and Medieval History 10. However, there are numerous other social media platforms that are accessible at the high school level that can be explored. In terms of professional development, it is unlikely that “traditional sit-and-get training sessions or one-time-only workshops” will be effective (Rodriguez & Knuth, 2000).

Formal professional development on using social media in learning environments has not been actively pursued in my district. However, professional development in this area is required where there is support for teachers “in developing authentic lessons that would integrate technology [like social media] into student learning experiences that engage critical thinking skills and have relevance beyond the classroom” (Williams et al., 2008).

Under the fourth standard, “Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility,” the final score was 13/16 placing my performance indicator in the “proficient” category. Again, the lower score results for this standard derive from the lack of global connections and the need to connect students with experts on issues around digital citizenship and responsibility. This echoes the need to consider how social media platforms could be effectively integrated in the courses I teach, and it is likely that technology could help “students transfer their knowledge among the content areas” and help “them make connections” (Rodriguez & Knuth, 2000).

The fifth and final standard, “Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership,” also resulted in a score of 13/16, placing me again in the “proficient” category. One major concern in this standard centers around conducting action research and sharing my results both locally and globally. In the past, I was involved in such projects, but not lately. However, in pursuing some of the professional development I have outlined in the previous four standards, it is quite possible I could participate in such initiatives again and further my own use of social media to connect with other educators, thus also modeling to my own students digital-age work and learning practices.

Note: Appendix B summarizes the required professional development aligned with the NETS•T standards.

Implementation Timeline – Three-Year Action Plan

Strong (2007) glibly states, “if your plan can be sustained for two to three years, consider yourself lucky.” Indeed, the quick changes in technology can seem almost like a formidable barrier for educators. However, Instructional technologist and Edutopia blogger Andrew Marcinek states it is unrealistic for classroom teachers to change at the same pace at which technology moves. He argues that teachers need to focus on a few tech tools a year and continually evolve those tools to provide “ a rich, dynamic curriculum” (Boss, 2011).

This plan has taken that approach by trying to use a few technology tools in different courses to address various curriculum outcomes. It should be noted that some of the objectives for year one were already started to some degree with the existing technology, but will be implemented on a broader basis with the acquisition of new technology. Additionally, some of the objectives for years two and three may be completed earlier, since some of the courses are offered over both semesters (twice a year) as opposed to just once a year in one semester.

Goals (Interventions)

Year One (Objectives)

Year Two

          (Objectives)

        Year Three

        (Objectives)

Students will use technology to engage in learning as global citizens and have opportunities to connect with each other online and then with other people, including experts on issues they are studying.

Students will become familiar with how they can use the Internet, Web 2.0 applications and various social media platforms to connect with each other to discuss and explore issues around course material.

Students will be given the opportunity to share their opinions and thoughts online where they can react and comment on each other’s work.

Students will connect with experts in the fields they are studying so they can ask questions and discuss issues.

Students will have learning opportunities that allow them to engage in authentic problem solving where they must work online collaboratively to plan and manage their research and the results using Internet resources.

Students will be involved in activities to help them determine what makes for a good sources on the Internet while also gaining a deeper understanding of bias and how interpretation and speculation (educated guesses) have to be considered even with reliable sources and the importance of distinguishing facts from interpretation and speculation.

Students will engage in both individual and group work where they will be required to complete research on a research question and to collaborate online using Web 2.0 applications, such as Google Docs and Blogger. Students will create their own data collecting resources, such as online polls, survey questions, etc.

Students will be introduced to a variety of media they can use to share their research results (video, podcasting, images, etc.) and they will not only present their results to their fellow peers but also publish their work online using Web 2.0 applications.

Students will explore and become familiar with different technologies and through collaborative investigation be able to determine which technology fits best for the desired result in their learning outcome as they address real world situations/problems.

Students will be introduced and learn how to use a number of different technologies and software, including video cameras, digital cameras, Web 2.0 applications, social media platforms, etc.

Students will apply the knowledge they have learned to determine which technology will be most effective in projects where they have to solve a problem or address an issue.

Students will consider their audience when producing their project to determine which medium (or media) will be the best fit for the delivery of their final product.

Students will be challenged to consider their digital footprint and how they act as digital citizens. They will also research media literacy, responsible use on the Internet and, where applicable, create guidelines or a code of ethics specific to their course outcomes.

Students will explore the concepts of digital footprints, digital citizenship, existing school computer policies and a course code of ethics.

Students will discuss and research the different issues and concerns in relation to Internet use (including privacy, social media, media literacy, and bullying).

Students will work in groups and select a particular issue and complete their own research and present their findings to the class and publish their work on the Internet.

Students will be expected to develop the necessary skills so they can be involved in identifying and solving common hardware and/or software issues that can occur in everyday use. This will include students becoming familiar with not only computers, but also other common technologies, such as cameras, video cameras, digital microphones, along with various software packages and Web 2.0 applications.

Students will be introduced and learn how to use a number of different technologies and software, including video cameras, digital cameras, Web 2.0 applications, social media platforms, etc.

Students will learn basic operation skills for the technology they use.

Students will be involved in various projects to apply the knowledge they have learned and to develop their skills.

Students will gain further skills in technology exploring programming, video production, Web 2.0 collaboration, etc.

Students will be expected to try to solve common technical problems working collaboratively with their classmates and using online resources.

Implement the TeackerKit software for continuous assessment and behaviour tracking updates and the ability to provide timely feedback.

Become familiar with the features of TeacherKit and enter in all the necessary student data.

Collect parental/guardian contact information and enter the data in the software

Record on a daily and/or weekly basis all assessment and behavior tracking information for students.

Use the software to make regular contacts and updates on course information with parents/guardians.

Evaluate the effectiveness of the software.

Implement an online collaborative tracking system to track students in their work assignments and to ensure that deadlines are being met.

Research which online tracking platform would likely work best (preferably free, trial or open source).

Implement the software and introduce it to the students in Journalism 120.

Use the software to track students and their job assignments to determine its effectiveness.

Determine if the software is effective and whether it would work in other courses.

Professional Development

Year One

Year Two

      Year Three

NETS•T standard:

Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity

Seek out online sources to learn more about programming and lesson ideas and activities for students in BBT 9.

Formal training for teaching programming in the classroom

Familiarization and training for teaching with the Raspberry Pi+

NETS•T standard:

Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments

Apply recently acquired knowledge on learning styles, MIs, etc. and seek out additional information and support for applying it to teaching practices.

i.e: http://www.braintargetedteaching.org

Attend Universal Design of Learning Professional Development

Participate in Universal Design of Learning pilot projects

NETS•T standard:

Model Digital-Age Work and Learning

Seek out more online sources and ideas to learn more about using social media in the classroom

NETS•T standard:

Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility

Seek out online global opportunities for the students to connect with other classrooms

NETS•T standard:

Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership

Join online sites to share and collaborate on lesson ideas and resources.

i.e.: http://teachersquare.org

Seek out possible opportunities for participating in action research

Participate in action research

i.e: Universal Design of Learning

Infrastructure Development

Year One

Year Two

Year Three

Network

Hardwired and Wi-Fi

Hardwired and Wi-Fi

Hardwired and Wi-Fi

Hardware

Six MacBook Pro Computers

One iMac Desktop Computer

One Classroom Desktop Computer

One Smart Board/Audio System

25 Dell Netbooks/HP Notebooks

Two Canon HD Video Cameras

Two Tripods

Two Microphones

25 Headphones

Two Canon SLR Cameras

One Zoom H2N Handy Digital Recorder

Green Screen and Lighting

One iPad

GoPro Hero Camera

Six Basic Digital Cameras

One Raspberry Pi+ Advanced Bundle

One HDMI Display

One HDMI Cable

Five Raspberry Pi+ Advanced Bundle

Five HDMI Displays

Five HDMI Cables

Software and Misc.

Smart Notebook

Google Drive

Weebly.com

Prezi.com

Blogger.com

Audacity

iMovie

iPhoto

GarageBand

MovieMaker

MS Office

Twitter

Teackerkit.net

Online Assignment Tracking Software

Adobe Photoshop Elements

Videoblocks.com

Subscription

Other Social Media Platforms (to be determined)

Videoblocks.com subscription

Evaluation

Formative and summative of students, teacher and learning environment

Formative and summative of students, teacher and learning environment

Formative and summative of students, teacher and learning environment

Budget and Funding Sources

Acquiring the right technology or determining if the money is being spent on the right technology are concerns of every stakeholder when considering technology budgets and funding for technology integration in the classroom. Teachers can be faced with “antiquated computers” and “scavenging to find computers that are even marginally capable of running rudimentary software” (Bauer & Kenton, 2005).

Fortunately, this classroom technology integration plan includes substantial financial and technical support from the District as well as a grant that was awarded to the school in March 2013. There is also additional relatively consistent funding available through other sources (school budget, teachers’ working condition fund, yearbook profits).

 Below is a chart that details the technology resources and where the funding is expected to come from over the next three years:

Category

Resources

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Network

Hardwired and Wi-Fi

District Expense

District Expense

District Expense

Hardware

Six MacBook Pro Computers

($8400.00)

Future Shop

Future Generations Grant

N/A

N/A

One iMac Desktop Computer

($1700.00)

Future Shop

Future Generations Grant

N/A

N/A

One Classroom Desktop Computer

($800.00)

District Expense

District Expense

District Expense

One Smart Board/Projector/Audio System

($4500.00)

District Expense

District Expense

District Expense

25 Dell Netbooks/HP Notebooks

($12, 500.00)

District Expense

District Expense

District Expense

Two Canon HD Video Cameras

Two Tripods

Two Microphones

($1900.00)

District Expense/

Profit from School Yearbook Sales

N/A

N/A

25 Headphones

($175.00)

School Budget Instructional Material

School Budget Instructional Material

School Budget Instructional Material

Two Canon SLR Cameras

($1200.00)

Future Shop Future Generations Grant and Profit from School Yearbook Sales

N/A

N/A

One Zoom H2N Handy Digital Recorder

($200.00)

Future Shop Future Generations Grant

N/A

N/A

Green Screen and Lighting

($1000.00)

District Expense

District Expense

District Expense

One iPad

($530.00)

Teacher’s Expense (personal device)

N/A

N/A

GoPro Hero Camera

($400.00)

N/A

Future Shop Future Generations Grant

N/A

Six Basic Digital Cameras

($900.00)

N/A

Future Shop Future Generations Grant

N/A

Six Raspberry Pi+ Advanced Bundle

($85 each = $425.00)

N/A

Teacher’s Working Condition Fund

(Purchase one)

Profit from School Yearbook Sales

Six HDMI Displays

Six HDMICables

($160 each = $960.00)

N/A

Teacher’s Working Condition Fund

(Purchase one)

Profit from School Yearbook Sales

Software and Misc.

Smart Notebook

Google Drive

Weebly.com

Prezi.com

Blogger.com

Audacity

Twitter

Teackerkit.net

No Cost: Open Source or Free

No Cost: Open Source or Free

No Cost: Open Source or Free

iMovie

iPhoto

GarageBand

MovieMaker

No Cost: Bundled with Hardware

No Cost: Bundled with Hardware

No Cost: Bundled with Hardware

MS Office

District Expense

District Expense

District Expense

Online Assignment Tracking Software

Undetermined

Undetermined

Undetermined

Adobe Photoshop Elements

($150.00)

N/A

Future Shop Future Generations Grant

N/A

Videoblocks.com

Subscription

($150.00 yearly)

Future Shop Future Generations Grant

Future Shop Future Generations Grant

Future Shop Future Generations Grant

Professional Development

Online Sources/

PD Provided by District/Department

No Cost

No Cost

No Cost

Evaluation (continuous improvement plan)

Whether it is instructional design using information technology or a technology integration plan, continuous assessment and evaluation is necessary. As indicated by Gulbahar (2005), “just writing out a document does not lead an institution.” Further, citing Czubaj (2002), Gulbahar (2005) points out that continuous revision addresses the reality of “rapid development in technologies.”

The evaluation process is what helps to make a technology plan dynamic. Citing van Braak (2003), Vanderlinde, Dexter, and Braak (2011) describe a technology plan as a “dynamic document subject to continuous improvement and revision.” Continuous evaluation requires for not only summative assessment, but also formative assessment. Formative assessment should consider how students have constructed products or addressed authentic and meaningful issues or problems as they apply the knowledge and skills they have gained in regard to curriculum outcomes. Additionally, it is also important to consider how successful the teacher has been in integrating the technology in the learning environment. This can include observations and feedback from both students and other stakeholders.

Finally, it is also helpful to keep “track of how much and by whom the technology is being used” (Technology@your fingertips). Observing usage patterns can be beneficial in determining how engaged students are in the lesson activities and the consistency of technology integration in the classroom.  The chart below indicates the evaluation that will take place to help determine how the success of the technology integration, while addressing any issues that may require changes to be made as the learning process evolves. Please also refer to Appendices D, E and also the links below for resources that will be used during the evaluation:

         Evaluation

       Students

        Teacher

 Overall Integration

Formative Evaluation

Projects, assignments, portfolios, reflection journals

Feedback from external sources (community members online experts) involved in student work

Teacher evaluation by principal or designate

Self - reflection and feedback from students

Technology Integration Assessment (See Appendix E)

Summative Evaluation

Assessment of technology skills/literacy using the NETS•S standards (see link above chart)

Final tests, exams and projects

Feedback from students through an online survey about the general learning environment and course(s) (see link above chart)

Reassessment of technology skills/literacy using the NETS•T standards (See Appendix D)

Summary of results from summative evaluations of students and teacher

Conclusion

        An effective technology plan describes its expectations, goals, contents, and actions concerning the integration of technology in education (Vanderlinde, van Braak & Hermans, 2009). Vision, professional development and evaluation are also essential elements to any plan that is focused on planning for technology. “Planning for technology emphasizes that the starting point for a school is a shared vision on teaching and learning enabled by technology rather than administrative tasks” (Vaderlinde et al, 2009).

        While this is a classroom plan for technology integration, many aspects of this plan consider existing feedback from students as well as anecdotal observations by teacher as well as results from action research on student netbook usage completed by the school in conjunction with the local school district.

        The main objective of this plan is echoed in Hew and Brush’s statement (2006), citing Staples, Pugach and Himes (2005), that one of the most important issues “regarding technology integration is to address the specific relationship between technology and particular curriculum content areas.” This plan will hopefully serve as a roadmap that provides enough signposts to translate the technology vision into reality (Hew & Brush, 2006), and flexible and dynamic enough to adapt to change when necessary.

References

Bauer, J & Kenton, J. (2005). Toward Technology Integration in the Schools: Why It Isn’t Happening. Retrieved August 6, 2013 from the World Wide Web: http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Toward+technology+integration+in+the+schools:+why+it+isn%27t+happening.-a0138483291

Boss, S. (2011). Technology Integration: What Experts Say. Edutopia. Retrieved July 26, 2013 from the World Wide Web: http://www.edutopia.org/technology-integration-experts

Brush, T. & Hew, K. (2007). Integrating technology into K-12 teaching and learning: current knowledge gaps and recommendations for future research. Educational Technology Research and Development, 55(3), 223-253.

Dexter, S. (2002). eTIPS-Educational Technology Integration and Implementation Principles. Retrieved August 10, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://sdexter.net/Vitae/papers/etips.pdf

Dexter, S. (2004). Helping Teachers Design Effective Learning Environments Supported by Educational Technology. Retrieved August 10, 2013, from the World Wide Web:

        http://sdexter.net/courses/589/downloads/%20%20ch1_intro_12.04.04.pdf

Gulbahar, Y. (2005). Technology planning: A roadmap to successful technology integration in schools. Retrieved July 10, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.mdecgateway.org/olms/data/resource/3917/Technology%20Planning.pdf

Hew, K.F., & Brush, T. (2006). Integrating Technology into K-12 Teaching and Learning: Current Knowledge Gaps and Recommendations for Future Research. Retrieved August 10, 2013 from the World Wide Web: http://santersero.pbworks.com/f/Integrating+technology+into+k_12+teaching.pdf

Kitchenham, A.D. (2009). School Cultures, Teachers, and Technology Transformation. Retrieved August 9, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://cjlt.csj.ualberta.ca/index.php/cjlt/article/view/523/256

Knuth, Amenta-Shin & Ciesemier (1999). Core Technology Competencies and Skills. Retrieved August 8, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/methods/technlgy/te10lk13.htm

Learning Indicators. Retrieved July 26, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/content/cntareas/math/ma2lindi.htm

McNabb, M. L., Valdez, G., Nowakowski, J. & Hawkes, M. (1999). Technology Connections for School Improvement: Planners’ Handbook. Retrieved August 8, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.borderlink.org/BLresources/content/files/handbook.pdf

Meaningful, Engaged Learning. Retrieved July 26, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/engaged.htm

NB3-21C: Creating a 21st Century Learning Model of Public Education. Retrieved August 2, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.district18.nbed.nb.ca/sites/district18.nbed.nb.ca/files/doc/edservice/517/nb3-21c.pdf

New Brunswick Broad Based Technology Website (2012). BBT Curriculum Outcomes. Retrieved July 21, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://bbt.nbed.nb.ca/orientation/bbt_outcomes/bbt_outcomes.html

New Brunswick Education Portal. Journalism Curriculum Outcomes. Implemented September 2011. Retrieved July 22, 2013, from the World Wide Web: https://portal.nbed.nb.ca/dana-na/auth/url_1/welcome.cgi

New Brunswick Education Portal. Media Studies Curriculum Implementation Draft September 2012. Retrieved July 22, 2013, from the World Wide Web: https://portal.nbed.nb.ca/dana-na/auth/url_1/welcome.cgi

New Brunswick Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (2013). Ancient Medieval History. Retrieved July 21, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.gnb.ca/0000/publications/curric/AncientMedievalHistoryGr10.pdf

Rees, D. (2010). Why we can’t ignore social media. Instructional Design Fusions. Retrieved August 16, 2013, from the World Wide Web:

http://instructionaldesignfusions.wordpress.com/2010/11/07/why-we-cant-ignore-social-media/

Rodriguez, G. & Knuth, R. (2000). Critical Issue: Providing Professional Development for Effective Technology Use. Retrieved August 9, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/methods/technlgy/te1000.htm#over

Rushkoff, D. (2011). Program or be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age. Brooklyn, NY: Soft Skull Press

Strong, Bart (2007). Strategic Planning for Technological Change. Retrieved July 26, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/eqm0737.pdf

TeachThought (2012). 60 Ways to Use Twitter in the Classroom by Category. Retrieved July 21, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.teachthought.com/social-media/60-ways-to-use-twitter-in-the-classroom-by-category/

Technology Integration Assessment Rubric. Retrieved August 28, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://activitytypes.wmwikis.net/file/view/TechIntegrationAssessmentRubric.pdf

Technology Planning: The Educator’s Guide. Retrieved August 2, 2013, from the World Wide Web: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YFUFfHDBFGPvuFcXA7tE9C3aUge4RMO8UOQ-W924ppE/edit

Vanderlinde, R., Dexter, S., & van Braak, J., School-based ICT policy plans in primary education: Elements, typologies and underlying processes. Retrieved July 10, 2013, from the World Wide Web: http://www.academia.edu/2280107/School-based_ICT_policy_plans_in_primary_education_Elements_typologies_and_underlying_processes

Vanderline, R., van Braak, J., & Hermans, R. (2009). Educational technology on a turning point: curriculum implementation in Flanders and challenges for schools. Educational Technology Research and Development. 57(4), 573-584

Williams, L., Atkinson, L., Cate, J., & O'Hair, M. (2008). Mutual Support Between Learning Community Development and Technology Integration: Impact on School Practices and Student Achievement. Theory Into Practice, 47(4), 294-302.

Appendix A

Course and Classroom Administration

Specific Technology Integration Charts

Integrating Technology into Broad Based Technology (Grade Nine)

Goals/Outcomes/

Curriculum Expectations

Specific Curriculum Outcome

Technology Integration

Technology Infrastructure

(Available)

Technology Infrastructure

(Needed)

Skill

Requirement

The desired end result

Specific steps to fulfilling the goals

How technology can potentially be used

Technology that is available for successful integration

Technology that will be needed for successful integration

What skills are required and what training is needed?

Communicate effectively by designing, developing, publishing, and presenting multimedia and online products.

The ability to interact positively and

respectfully with others in creating new ideas

and developing products.

 

The ability to lead or work in a team and to

relate to other people in varying contexts,

including capacity to resolve and manage

conflict.

Spreadsheets: Identify when a spreadsheet is the appropriate tool for organizing data to enhance or meet the requirements of a project or product create, edit and format a spreadsheet

Multimedia: Plan and storyboard and create a variety of multi-media presentations with an intended purpose and audience

Web Design: Plan, storyboard and produce a web site with a minimum of three pages and an index page for an intended audience/purpose using both web editors and HTML

Work effectively in groups to brainstorm, plan, implement and create products

Using the SMART Board, computer and Internet access, the students will have discussions on various topics they can consider for a research topic related to technology (such as Internet privacy) http://www.priv.gc.ca/youth-jeunes/fs-fi/res/gn_index_e.asp and how to construct research tools such as surveys or questionnaires. The students will also view and discuss various documentaries such as CBC’s Doc Zone’s Facebook Follies (http://www.cbc.ca/doczone/episode/facebook-follies.html) and Are We Digital Dummies?

(http://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/doczone/2010/digitaldummies/)

Students will work in small groups and select an issue related to technology (cyber-bulling, Internet privacy, Social Media, etc.). They will explore and research their topic (creating surveys, collecting data, etc) then plan and create a website presenting their findings using an online web builder and embedding their own multimedia features (such as podcasts, videos, slideshows).

Wireless Internet connectivity and access to online sites

Headphones

Six MacBook Pros to be used for group work in multimedia products installed with iMovie and GarageBand and equipped with built in microphones.

Two Canon high definition video cameras with two external microphones and tripods.

Two Canon digital SLR cameras

Dell Netbooks for Internet research and cloud computing

Google Drive - word processor, spreadsheet, survey creation (forms) - online collaboration

Weebly.com for website building

Prezi.com and Audacity (http://audacity.sourceforge.net/) as alternative platforms for multimedia creation

SMART Board, computer, classroom audio system and Internet access for classroom discussions, etc.

Blogger.com for course blog where students can access suggested topic and research resources.

Internet skills (for searching, sourcing information and using selected Web 2.0 applications)

Familiarity with SMART Board use

Solid knowledge of Mac OS and Windows OS

Knowledge of Google Docs  (word processor, spreadsheet,  forms) and its collaboration features

Knowledge on how to use iMovie, iPhoto, Garageband, Audacity, Prezi, Weebly, Blogger

Basic knowledge on video and SLR digital cameras

Additional Training and/or Other Issues:

Additional features of Weebly and Audacity

Additional features of SLR and video cameras

Investigate, design, produce and evaluate technological solutions

Independently apply a design process model which should include, a design brief, investigate/research, generate options, select best option, design and produce (develop solution), evaluate and articulate.

With the SMART Board and information presented on the teacher’s blog, students will become familiar with basic computer terminology such as logic board, processor, graphic card, RAM, etc.

Using a circuit board and the operating system Linux, students will work in groups to assemble a computer with a monitor and keyboard and experiment and determine what they can accomplish with the system, such as Internet access, word processing, etc.  Students will be expected to document their experience and reflect on their learning using a blog.

Wireless Internet connectivity and access to online sites

SMART Board, computer, classroom audio system  and Internet access for classroom discussions, etc.

Dell Netbooks for Internet research and cloud computing

Blogger.com for course blog where students can access suggested topic and research resources. And student blogs for students to document the experience, their progress and reflect on their learning.

Raspberry Pi + Advanced Bundle: Raspberry Pi Model B (43W5302), Bud case, power supply, pre-loaded Linux 4GB SD card, keyboard and mouse. (approx. six kits @ $85.00 each)

(http://canada.newark.com/raspberry-pi-accessories?CMP=KNC-G-SUPP-RASPBERRYPI&mckv=saqjQFMkZ|pcrid|17340880372|plid|)

Displays with HDMI or RCA connection (approx. six)

HDMI cables (six)

Internet skills (for searching, sourcing information)

Familiarity with SMART Board use

Working knowledge of Linux OS and Blogger.com

Familiarity with basic computer terminology

Working knowledge of the Raspberry Pi+

Additional Training and/or Other Issues:

The operation of Linux

Assembling and using the Raspberry Pi

(http://www.raspberrypi.org/quick-start-guide)

Integrating Technology into Ancient and Medieval History (Grade Ten)

Goals/Outcome/

Curriculum Expectations

Specific Curriculum Outcome

Technology Integration

Technology Infrastructure

(Available)

Technology Infrastructure

(Needed)

Skill

Requirement

The desired end result

Specific steps to fulfilling the goals

How technology can potentially be used

Technology that is available for successful integration

Technology that will be needed for successful integration

What skills are required and what training is needed?

Students will identify:

The biological and environmental factors that shaped the early development of humanity.

                                        

                                

                        

                

                                

                        

                

Identify the physical characteristic which increased human ability to adapt and survive.

Students learn about the Theory of Evolution and the different hominid species that make up humanity’s pre-history, recognizing the physical and mental attributes of each species and their importance to existence, survival and human evolution.

Supplementing the textbook, students will view a documentary that explores the Theory of Evolution that contains updated information on more recent discoveries.

(http://shop.nationalgeographic.com/ngs/product/dvds/national-geographic-channel-dvds/science-and-technology/search-for-the-ultimate-survivor-dvd)

They will also explore supplement material online and then write a composition using Google Drive arguing which species they would prefer to be and argue which attributes of this species makes their choice the best one. They will share their work with other students for discussion and debate before submitting the work for summative evaluation.

Wireless Internet connectivity and access to online sites

SMART Board, computer, classroom audio system, and Internet access for video documentary, classroom discussions, etc.

Dell Netbooks to use for Internet research and cloud computing.

Blogger.com for course blog where students can access online supplement information.

Google Drive for students to write their compositions and share with other students online before online submission

Internet skills (for searching, sourcing information)

Knowledge of Google Docs  (word processor, spreadsheet, forms) and its collaboration features

Familiarity with SMART Board use

Additional Training and/or Other Issues:

Source online sites for supplement information

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the civilizations which emerged in Mesopotamia.
                                        
                                
                        

                

                                
                        
                

Students will gain knowledge about the different ancient civilizations in Mesopotamia (Chaldea, Assyria, Babylonia, etc.), focusing on law, religion, writing, social structure and technological innovations.

As a unit assignment, students will work in groups to gather information on an assigned ancient civilization in Mesopotamia (Chaldea, Assyria, Babylonia, etc.) Using both traditional and Internet sources, they will highlight key characteristics of their assigned civilization, focusing on law, religion, writing, social structure and technological innovations.

The students will determine how they want to present this information to the rest of the class through the digital medium of their choice (such as iMovie, Movie Maker, Prezi, PowerPoint, Google Presentation). Students can consider using some of the techniques they have viewed in professional documentaries, such as voiceovers.

SMART Board, computer, classroom audio system, and Internet access for the student presentations

Dell Netbooks for Internet research and cloud computing.

Wireless Internet connectivity and access to online sites

Headphones

Six MacBook Pros to be used for group work installed with iMovie and equipped with built in microphones.

Prezi, Google Drive (for Google Presentation), PowerPoint, Movie Maker - as other choices depending on each group’s preference. Access available  either on the MacBook Pros or Dell Notebooks.

Blogger.com for course blog where students can access online supplement information.

Internet skills (for searching, sourcing information)

Knowledge of Google Docs  (word processor, spreadsheet, forms) and its collaboration features

Familiarity with SMART Board use

Working knowledge of Mac OS and Windows OS

Knowledge of Blogger

Knowledge on how to use iMovie, or Movie Maker, or Prezi, or PowerPoint, or Google Presentation

Additional Training and/or Other Issues:

Source online sites for supplement information on the different ancient civilizations

Students should understand how civilization emerged in the Aegean the influences that shaped that civilization and the influences it exerted on other civilizations.
                                        
                                
                        
                
                                
                        
                

Demonstrate an awareness of Alexander's exploits and an understanding of the role played by Alexander the Great as an agent of cross-cultural fertilization.

During classroom discussions, lessons, documentaries and assignments, students will be asked to use Twitter to tweet ideas, questions, quotes, using a classroom hashtag. As the class begins to explore the different cultures that Alexander and his army encountered, the students will be assigned to tweet daily “short diary entries” as if they were a soldier in Alexander’s army expressing how they feel about the experiences and their leader’s decisions and choices as they encounter new people and confront different cultures.

Additionally, students will connect with a local author who has a great interest and passion around the history of Alexander the Great to discuss their ideas, quotes, questions, etc. - and to receive feedback on their 140 character diary entries.

SMART Board, computer, classroom audio system, and Internet access for the student presentations

Dell Netbooks for accessing Twitter and other online sources

Wireless Internet connectivity and access to Twitter and other online sites.

Internet skills

Working knowledge of Twitter and an account

Additional Training Required:

Source online sites for supplement information

Source documentaries exploring Alexandra The Great and the influences of his conquests on other cultures and vice-versa.

Contact author Brent Sherrard to see if he would discuss Alexander the Great with the class (what medium is best for him - is Twitter an option?) And the possibility of a classroom visit as a final activity).

Integrating Technology into Journalism 120

Goals/Outcome/

Curriculum Expectations

Specific Curriculum Outcome

Technology Integration

Technology Infrastructure

(Available)

Technology Infrastructure

(Needed)

Skill

Requirement

The desired end result

Specific steps to fulfilling the goals

How technology can potentially be used

Technology that is available for successful integration

Technology that will be needed for successful integration

What skills are required and what training is needed?

Students practice journalistic integrity

                                        

                                

                        

                

                                

                        

                

Working collaboratively and cooperatively, students will research and discuss code of ethics and then develop a code of ethics that they will follow as student journalists.

                                                        

                                                                                         

                                

                        

                

                                

                                

                        

                

After some class instruction and discussion, students will work in groups and access the Code of Ethics of the Society of Professional Journalists (http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp)

After becoming familiar with the code of ethics, they will apply their knowledge to different possible tricky scenarios

(http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/journalismstudies20/print_journalism/teacher_ethics_journalism.htm)

After these lessons, students will work collaboratively using a document in Google Drive to develop a class journalistic code of ethics.

SMART Board, computer, classroom audio system, and Internet access for the student presentations.

Dell Netbooks for accessing sites and Google Drive.

Wireless Internet connectivity

Blogger.com to provide links to related sites on the course blog.

Google Drive for students to work collaboratively on their class code of ethics.

Internet skills (for searching, sourcing information)

Knowledge of Google Drive and its collaboration features

Knowledge of Blogger

Familiarity with SMART Board use

Students produce and present news in a relevant and engaging format.
                                        
                                
                        
                
                                        
                                
                        

                

                                
                        
                

Students will create (develop content, organize word and voice) opinion pieces, feature stories, and news story.

                 Students will employ a variety of techniques to communicate the message.

Students will follow the composition (print, visual, oral texts) process (planning, drafting, revising, editing

Students will employ journalistic writing/representing techniques

                                                        

                                                                                         

                

        

During the semester, students will take on different roles from camera operation, photographer, reporter, interviewer, etc. and create news, sports and feature stories using different mediums (video, podcasts, written, etc.) All these mediums will be collected on an online student newspaper which the students will also develop and maintain during the course (with links to social media such as Facebook and Twitter). Some students will also be responsible for the school yearbook where some of the material (particularly the photos) can be used.

SMART Board, computer, classroom audio system, and Internet access for group brainstorming, planning and discussions

Dell Netbooks for Internet research and cloud computing.

Wireless Internet connectivity and access to online sites

Six MacBook Pros and one iMac installed with iMovie and Garage Band and equipped with built in microphones.

 

Blogger.com or other development tool for the online school newspaper. (http://www.theblackvilletalon.com/)

Google Docs for planning, storyboarding and writing

Zoom H2N Handy Digital Recorder

Two Canon high definition video cameras with two external microphones and tripods.

Two Canon digital SLR cameras

GoPro Hero Camera

Adobe Photoshop Elements

Six basic digital cameras

Internet skills

Familiarity with SMART Board use

Solid knowledge of Mac OS and Windows OS

Knowledge on how to use iMovie, Garageband, Blogger, Google Docs, iPhoto and Adobe Photoshop Elements

Basic knowledge on video and SLR digital cameras

Basic HTML knowledge

Additional Training and/or Other Issues:

Additional features of SLR and video cameras

Source other possible platforms for online

school newspaper

Gain working knowledge of Zoom H2N Handy Digital Recorder and its features

Integrating Technology into Media Studies 120

Goals/Outcome/

Curriculum Expectations

Specific Curriculum Outcome

Technology Integration

Technology Infrastructure

(Available)

Technology Infrastructure

(Needed)

Skill

Requirement

The desired end result

Specific steps to fulfilling the goals

How technology can potentially be used

Technology that is available for successful integration

Technology that will be needed for successful integration

What skills are required and what training is needed?

Students demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts of media literacy

Students employ critical literacy skills as media consumers

Students engage in the inquiry process         

Students justify their positions and respect the positions of others        

                

                                

                        

                

Students will discuss, research, share, and discover relevant and current examples on issues around key concepts of media literacy.

                                                

                                                                                         

                                

                        

                

                

During the learning experience, students will create an online presence through a class blog where each week they will be required to discuss an issue related to media literacy. Students will be provided with some online sites that can be helpful for sourcing an issue while also being encouraged to search for their own as well. Any choice is acceptable (as long as it is “PG-13”) and they can relate their discovery to one or more media literacy concepts and explain their reasoning and opinion on the issue. Each week one students will share their discovery with the class for a class discussion and each week students will be required to also discuss the issues online by leaving substantial replies on a certain number of other student blogs.

Wireless Internet connectivity and access to online sites

SMART Board, computer, classroom audio system and Internet access for classroom discussions, etc.

Dell Netbooks for Internet research and blogging

Blogger.com for course blog where students can access suggested topic and research resources. And student blogs for students to document their weekly selections.

Internet skills (for searching, sourcing information)

Knowledge of Blogger (or other blog site that is accessible at school)

Familiarity with SMART Board use

Additional Training and/or Other Issues:

Source online sites for supplement information

Students apply key concepts of media literacy as creators of media texts
                                        
                                
                        
                
                                        
                                
                        

                

                        

Create media texts to demonstrate understanding of social, political, commercial and cultural values

                                                        

                                                                                         

                                

                        

                

                        

        

After class lessons and continuing discussions and exploration of key concepts of media literacy, students will work independently or in groups to create a public service type video that educates and promotes awareness of some aspect or issues around media literacy.

Dell Netbooks for Internet research.

Wireless Internet connectivity and access to online sites

Six MacBook Pros and one iMac installed with iMovie and Garage Band and equipped with built in microphones.

Google Docs for planning and storyboarding

Two Canon high definition video cameras with two external microphones and tripods.

Two Canon digital SLR cameras

Access to copyright free video clips with a videoblocks.com subscription

Green screen and lighting

Continued subscription to www.videoblocks.com

Internet skills

Solid knowledge of Mac OS and Windows OS

Knowledge of Google Docs  and its collaboration features

Knowledge on how to use iMovie and Garageband

Basic knowledge on video and SLR digital cameras

Additional Training and/or Other Issues:

Additional features of SLR and video cameras

Lighting application knowledge and lighting setup for the green screen

Integrating Technology into the Classroom Administration

Goals/Outcome/

Curriculum Expectations

Specific Curriculum Outcome

Technology Integration

Technology Infrastructure

(Available)

Technology Infrastructure

(Needed)

Skill

Requirement

The desired end result

Specific steps to fulfilling the goals

How technology can potentially be used

Technology that is available for successful integration

Technology that will be needed for successful integration

What skills are required and what training is needed?

The ability to quickly record student data and progress for summative and formative assessment as well as attendance and behaviour tracking with the ability to provide timely feedback to students, parents and administration.                 

                                

                        

                

Tracking of job assignments in Journalism 120 so deadlines can be reasonably met and students clearly know what their responsibilities are.

Record all student data and photos at the beginning of the semester in a classroom database and continually update student records (marks, attendance, behaviour)

                                                

                                                                         

Implement an online (possibly free or open source) tracking system where students can see who is responsible for what while also being reminded of their own deadlines. Preferably an online platform that can be easily viewed using mobile devices.

Use iPad with a teacher app so information is easily accessible with students, staff meetings, parent teacher and at home.

Continually export data to teacher computer for backup and for option to print any data.

Allow both teacher and editors (online school newspaper and yearbook) to have administrative access to an online tracking system for job assignments and show students how they can review what they are responsible and when it is due.

iPad

Teacher computer

Google Drive/ MS Office

Wireless connectivity

Dell Netbooks (or students can access via their own devices when not in class)

Teacher computer or iPad

TeacherKit

(http://teacherkit.net/)

The online tracking platform (research into which system would work best is incomplete).

Internet skills

Familiarity with the iPad

Working knowledge of Teacherkit, Spreadsheets (Google Drive/MS Office)

Additional Training and/or Other Issues:

Download TeacherKit app and become familiar with features

Internet Skills

Familiarity with the online tracking platform and its features

Additional Training and/or Other Issues:

Complete research and decide on a platform.

 

Learn how it operates.

Appendix B  

Chart Summary of Professional Development Requirement

Appendix C

Technology Self-Assessment Tool for Classroom Teachers

(Paper Copy of Online Format)

Technology Self-Assessment Tool for Classroom Teachers

This assessment tool follows the standards set by ISTE-NETS (for teachers).
http://www.iste.org/standards/nets-for-teachers
Each descriptor was taken from the "transformative" performance indicator stage from a rubric that is aligned with the NETS•T five standards.
If you require clarification on any descriptor, you can gauge it against the other three performance indicators by accessing the entire rubric here:
http://www.cde.state.co.us/sites/default/files/documents/edtech/download/netsstandardsrubriccombined.pdf

* Required

Top of Form


Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity

Teachers use their knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in both face-to-face and virtual environments.

As a teacher, I regularly engage with students as lead learner in creative thinking activities and inspire students to explore complex issues, generate new ideas, create and critique original works, and develop and evaluate new products and processes. *

I regularly involve students in learning experiences that require identifying and defining authentic questions and problems, planning for and managing their research, and using multiple processes and perspectives to discover, propose, and evaluate multiple solutions. *

I involve students in ongoing examination and evaluation of their own thinking, planning, and creativity. Encourage learners to articulate and share their thinking with others through technology-enhanced team work. *

I model knowledge construction and creative thinking in a variety of face-to-face and virtual learning environments and situations by engaging in real-world problem solving with students, peers, and experts. *

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #1 *

Briefly explain any best practices you have used for statements where you answered "usually" or "sometimes." If you answered "not applicable" explain your reasoning.

 

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #1 *

Each answer has a numerical value. The highest possible total for this standard is 16. Add up your score and enter it below. A 16 on the performance indicator for this rubric would describe you as "transformative." A total of 12 or more would likely place you at "proficient" and a score between 8 and 12 would most likely place you at "developing." Lower scores would place you at "beginning." Refer to the rubric to see the descriptors for the other performance indicator levels. Adjust accordingly for N/A responses.

 

Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments

Teachers design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessments incorporating contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the NETS·S.

I engage students in collaborative learning challenges where they research global problems. I guide learners to select a specific problem to investigate, create research questions, select and employ strategies and determine best solutions. Students use technology tools to present their results and share information for application in a real-world setting. *

I enable students to independently use technology resources to manage their own learning goals, plan learning strategies, and evaluate their progress and outcomes. *

I identify and develop wIth students personalized learning experiences aligned with preferred learning styles, work strategies, and abilities. *

I engage students in the development and analysis of formative and summative assessments to adjust teaching and learning for increased success. *

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #2 *

Briefly explain any best practices you have used for statements where you answered "usually" or "sometimes." If you answered "not applicable" explain your reasoning.

 

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #2 *

Each answer has a numerical value. The highest possible total for this standard is 16. Add up your score and enter it below. A 16 on the performance indicator for this rubric would describe you as "transformative." A total of 12 or more would likely place you at "proficient" and a score between 8 and 12 would most likely place you at "developing." Lower scores would place you at "beginning." Refer to the rubric to see the descriptors for the other performance indicator levels. Adjust accordingly for N/A responses.

 

Model Digital-Age Work and Learning

Teachers exhibit knowledge, skills, and work processes representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital society.

I engage with students in collaborative exploration of emerging technologies and investigate together how these tools can be used in real world situations to solve problems, involve students in identifying and solving common hardware and software problems that occur in everyday use. *

I employ a variety of digital environments and media to collaborate with project teams or learners of other countries and cultures to produce original works or solve shared problems. *

I evaluate and use a variety of digital tools, resources, and media to communicate information and ideas to a global audience, demonstrating cultural understanding. *

I use current and emerging digital tools and resources efficiently and effectively to deepen knowledge of information fluency and its application to teaching and learning and share results with students, parents, and colleagues. *

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #3 *

Briefly explain any best practices you have used for statements where you answered "usually" or "sometimes." If you answered "not applicable" explain your reasoning.

 

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #3 *

Each answer has a numerical value. The highest possible total for this standard is 16. Add up your score and enter it below. A 16 on the performance indicator for this rubric would describe you as "transformative." A total of 12 or more would likely place you at "proficient" and a score between 8 and 12 would most likely place you at "developing." Lower scores would place you at "beginning." Refer to the rubric to see the descriptors for the other performance indicator levels. Adjust accordingly for N/A responses.

 

Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility

Teachers understand local and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal and ethical behaviour in their professional practices.

I engage students in developing a system for promoting and monitoring safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology and for determining a system for addressing misuse of technology resources. *

I examine and research issues related to equitable access to technology in school, community, and home environments including identification and use of assistive technologies to meet the diverse needs of students. *

I engage learners in researching the responsibilities related to the use of digital tools and resources and the consequences of misuse in a global information society. Work collaboratively with students in the development of policies and procedures for responsible use of technology and information resources. *

I engage students in collaborative research and publication with students and experts from other countries to develop global cultural understanding. *

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #4 *

Briefly explain any best practices you have used for statements where you answered "usually" or "sometimes." If you answered "not applicable" explain your reasoning.

 

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #4 *

Each answer has a numerical value. The highest possible total for this standard is 16. Add up your score and enter it below. A 16 on the performance indicator for this rubric would describe you as "transformative." A total of 12 or more would likely place you at "proficient" and a score between 8 and 12 would most likely place you at "developing." Lower scores would place you at "beginning." Refer to the rubric to see the descriptors for the other performance indicator levels. Adjust accordingly for N/A responses.

 

Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership

Teachers continuously improve their professional practice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their school and professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and resources.

I help develop and sustain local and global learning communities to exchange ideas and methods related to creative applications of technology and to enhance the effective use of technology for learning. *

I participate in developing a vision for technology infusion in the school and the wider community, advocate for its adoption, help facilitate shared decision making, and promote the development of leadership and technology skills in others. *

I contribute to the effective use of technology to enhance teaching and learning by conducting action research, evaluating the outcomes, and sharing the results locally and globally. *

I demonstrate, discuss and present to parents, school leaders, and the larger community the impact on learning of the effective use of digital resources and the ongoing renewal of professional practice. *

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #5 *

Briefly explain any best practices you have used for statements where you answered "usually" or "sometimes." If you answered "not applicable" explain your reasoning.

 

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #5 *

Each answer has a numerical value. The highest possible total for this standard is 16. Add up your score and enter it below. A 16 on the performance indicator for this rubric would describe you as "transformative." A total of 12 or more would likely place you at "proficient" and a score between 8 and 12 would most likely place you at "developing." Lower scores would place you at "beginning." Refer to the rubric to see the descriptors for the other performance indicator levels. Adjust accordingly for N/A responses.

 

NETS Teacher Rubric

The entire rubric with all descriptors can be accessed here: http://www.cde.state.co.us/sites/default/files/documents/edtech/download/netsstandardsrubriccombined.pdf

Reference

NETS project (2008). National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers, Second Edition. International Society for Technology in Education.

 

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Appendix D

Results from Technology Self-Assessment Tool for Classroom Teachers

(Paper Copy of Online Format)

1 response


Summary

Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity

As a teacher, I regularly engage with students as lead learner in creative thinking activities and inspire students to explore complex issues, generate new ideas, create and critique original works, and develop and evaluate new products and processes.

Usually (3)

1

100%

I regularly involve students in learning experiences that require identifying and defining authentic questions and problems, planning for and managing their research, and using multiple processes and perspectives to discover, propose, and evaluate multiple solutions.

Usually (3)

1

100%

I involve students in ongoing examination and evaluation of their own thinking, planning, and creativity. Encourage learners to articulate and share their thinking with others through technology-enhanced teamwork.

Usually (3)

1

100%

I model knowledge construction and creative thinking in a variety of face-to-face and virtual learning environments and situations by engaging in real-world problem solving with students, peers, and experts.

Usually (3)

1

100%

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #1

Media Studies 120 - Some projects present an issue or problem and students are given some choices for how they want to tackle the project but are left to decide what to use and also what medium they feel would best carry their message.

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #1

12/16

Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments

I engage students in collaborative learning challenges where they research global problems. I guide learners to select a specific problem to investigate, create research questions, select and employ strategies and determine best solutions. Students use technology tools to present their results and share information for application in a real-world setting.

Usually (3)

1

100%

I enable students to independently use technology resources to manage their own learning goals, plan learning strategies, and evaluate their progress and outcomes.

Usually (3)

1

100%

I identify and develop wIth students personalized learning experiences aligned with preferred learning styles, work strategies, and abilities.

Sometimes (2)

1

100%

I engage students in the development and analysis of formative and summative assessments to adjust teaching and learning for increased success.

Usually (3)

1

100%

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #2

In Writing 110 students have contributed to both formative and summative assessments by creating peer-to-peer assessments and final evaluation rubrics. In BBT 9 students have created research questions and developed data gathering tools to determine social media practices of certain age groups at the school.

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #2

11/16

Model Digital-Age Work and Learning

I engage with students in collaborative exploration of emerging technologies and investigate together how these tools can be used in real world situations to solve problems, involve students in identifying and solving common hardware and software problems that occur in everyday use.

Usually (3)

1

100%

I employ a variety of digital environments and media to collaborate with project teams or learners of other countries and cultures to produce original works or solve shared problems.

Sometimes (2)

1

100%

I evaluate and use a variety of digital tools, resources, and media to communicate information and ideas to a global audience, demonstrating cultural understanding.

Sometimes (2)

1

100%

I use current and emerging digital tools and resources efficiently and effectively to deepen knowledge of information fluency and its application to teaching and learning and share results with students, parents, and colleagues.

Usually (3)

1

100%

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #3

In BBT 9 students are encouraged to explore a wide variety of Web 2.0 applications and determine how they can be useful in their learning experiences.

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #3

10/16

Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility

I engage students in developing a system for promoting and monitoring safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology and for determining a system for addressing misuse of technology resources.

Always (4)

1

100%

I examine and research issues related to equitable access to technology in school, community, and home environments including identification and use of assistive technologies to meet the diverse needs of students.

Always (4)

1

100%

I engage learners in researching the responsibilities related to the use of digital tools and resources and the consequences of misuse in a global information society. Work collaboratively with students in the development of policies and procedures for responsible use of technology and information resources.

Usually (3)

1

100%

I engage students in collaborative research and publication with students and experts from other countries to develop global cultural understanding.

Sometimes (2)

1

100%

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #4

Students explore their standing as digital citizens in BBT 9 and also consider their digital footprint while looking at issues around social media, Internet privacy, etc. I supply a number of copyright free or friendly websites for students when they need materials, such as photos, music, video clips, etc. And also encourage them to create their own.

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #4

13/16

Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership

I help develop and sustain local and global learning communities to exchange ideas and methods related to creative applications of technology and to enhance the effective use of technology for learning.

Usually (3)

1

100%

I participate in developing a vision for technology infusion in the school and the wider community, advocate for its adoption, help facilitate shared decision-making, and promote the development of leadership and technology skills in others

Always (4)

1

100%

I contribute to the effective use of technology to enhance teaching and learning by conducting action research, evaluating the outcomes, and sharing the results locally and globally.

Sometimes (2)

1

100%

I demonstrate, discuss and present to parents, school leaders, and the larger community the impact on learning of the effective use of digital resources and the ongoing renewal of professional practice.

Always (4)

1

100%

Your summary for NETS•T Standard #5

I have worked closely with my school, the district and department in a few pilot projects with technology and also have shared a number of my own lessons/units in my district.

Where you stand on NETS•T Standard #5

13/16



Appendix E