Student WorkshopsScreen Shot 2017-04-03 at 9.53.59 PM.pngScreen Shot 2017-04-03 at 9.53.59 PM.png

Elementary

A) Breakin' the Basics: An Introduction to the Scientific Method through Dance

Glen Reyes, B-Boy Flex (Greg Cheeatow) and B-Girl Shine (Avery Cheeatow), How Hip Hop Helps (H4), The Universal B-boy League (UBL), and Bag of Trix

Breakin' the Basics will highlight how the the dance of hip hop (Breakin') can be used as a tool to understand and practice the key components of the scientific method.  In this session we plan to breakdown the scientific method into a digestible form for students.

First, we plan to provide students with a foundation on which to build on by teaching them basic steps (Basic Two-Step, Top-Rocks, Breakdowns and Ground Shuffle).  Next, students will be put into groups and will be guided through the creative process that emphasizes the elements of the scientific method, namely; observation, forming a hypothesis (idea), testing, refining, and developing a general theory.  In this section students will create their own moves by creating a routine with their group members or highlighting a soloist.  It is here that students will learn how technology has sped up the learning curve of breakin' as students will use their cell phones both as a self assessment tool and as a research tool.  Lastly, students will have the opportunity to showcase their their ideas in a larger group circle including everyone, which is typically known in the hip hop culture as a cypher.

We aim for students to leave our session with a new sense of appreciation for breakin' culture, an understanding of how the arts can enhance the science disciplines, and embrace dance as a universal language.

B) Hip Hop Bots

Annika Pint and Luke Persaud , TDSB Robotics

Students will have an opportunity to choreograph dance routines and create art using robots! By learning some of the basic programming skills required to move their LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robots, students can explore elements of hip hop culture in a new way and express their identity by moving the robots to music or creating graffiti art.

C) R2R Radio Roundtable

Roger Thompson , Read2Rap Program

R2R Radio provides a platform for youth to express themselves freely through live radio/podcasts. Participants are encouraged to voice their opinions, concerns and comments to help educate and entertain their listening audience. Topics covered include "Race in Hip Hop" "Playing the Trump Card"" Truth about Hip Hop" "Gender Roles in Media" "Loving Yourself First" and a free platform for youth to create their own show. For samples of our past shows check out www.read2rap.com & www.r2rradio.com  

D) Beyond the Tag

Trish Boon, TDSB

Since the beginning, hip-hop has been about giving a voice to those without. This workshop will show how one of the pillars of hip-hop culture, graffiti, has inspired artists all over the world to take to the streets to speak out. Students will explore the social justice roots of hip-hop and how they connect to street art today. Then, they will get the chance to create their own portable stencils to take to the streets.


E) Mni Wiconi #Water Is Life

Mahlikah Awe:ri Enml'ga't Saqama'sgw (The Woman Who Walks In The Light)  Red Slam Collective

From Standing Rock to Flint Michigan to Grassy Narrows to Line 9 and the Chippewas of the Thames First Nations #Water is Life is what is trending around the world. Hip Hop artists such as Mos Def with his track New World Water and the Roots, Water have been expressing the impact of water as a capitalistic commodity since the 90's. Indigenous people have been sharing the teachings of the "Black Snake and the Thunderbird" for centuries. Now the indigenous teachings of Water as Sacred and the social movement of Hip Hop are coming together under one banner of solidarity across Turtle Island. This social change art making workshop will have participants creating their own spoken word pieces utilizing rap and slam poetry to explore the current collective warriorism for the emancipation of water; which is a direct emancipation of our indigenous water protectors and us as allies.    

F) Learn the Art of Imagineering Stories using Collage & Mix Media 

Quentin VerCetty, BSAM (Black Speculative Arts Movement) Canada 

The core of Hip-Hop is about storytelling through different expressions. Composition, movement and flow is essential to every element and pillar of applied knowledge. Whether it’s juju’ing on the beat, or stepping to a scratch and mix, or bobbing to Boi Wonda’s drums, or decoding Kendrick Lamar’s rhyming scheme or rocking with a Drake verse, or analysing a graffiti mural. In this cypher, participants will learn to translate communication techniques to visually imagine and engineer their own tale.

Participants will be encouraged to think about social justice through a futuristic lens to address a personal topic of interest using science fiction or anything that might involve a futuristic aesthetic - as Hip-Hop is all about thinking forward. Using the principles of design, partakers will create unique examples of collage stories that draw from the well of their imagination, experiences and internal beats and rhymes.

G) Re-imagining Rhythms

Leanne McGuirk Roots Learning Program

In this workshop, Roots Learning Program's owner and educational specialist Leanne McGuirk will teach students about the musical and cultural history behind the music that they love.  With the assistance of local hip hop educators, Ms. McGuirk will guide students through a musical journey, from Negro spirituals to jazz to blues to soul to funk to R&B and help students draw musical correlations to the rap music of the last 30 years (i.e. The Notorious BIG sampling Screamin' Jay Hawkins' "I Put a Spell on You" in his class "Kick in the Door").

The second half of the workshop will put the students musical and lyrical knowledge to the test.  They will write their own short verses and perform them to one of these classic tracks.

P) Hip Hop / STEM Fair (open to elementary and secondary students)

Various Artists/Educators

The STEM Fair is an open space marketplace where students will have access to various STEM activities that explore the use of technology as it relates to Hip Hop music and culture.

Station

Facilitator

Location

I

Words, Rhymes, Flows

Motion

Front Hallway left of auditorium

II

Robotics

Kidder

Front Hallway right of auditorium

III

Live Graffiti Art

Danilo

Stage Right

IV

DJing

Power

Stage Left

V

Beatboxing

Unity Charity

Small Gym

VI

Breakdancing

Unity Charity

Small Gym

VII

Robotics

Moe Perera

Chris Johannesen

Small Gym

VIII

Beatmaking

Urban Arts

Small Gym

Secondary

H) Naturally Me CANCELLED

Crystal Penrose TDSB

This workshop is all about exploring and highlighting the natural beauty of women. Since the birth of Hip Hop, many artists have challenged the standards of beauty in Western culture. From Queen Latifah to Solange Knowles, women in Hip Hop and related genres have been carving out their own definition of beauty. The focus of this workshop is an exploration of beauty in all of its’ forms —internal and external.  As KRS ONE says in his song “Prophets vs. Profits”, "Begin with the heart / our sisters is a living art / Always givin', always deliverin’ / always making something bigger from just a little part”. Through a series of engaging interactive stations, participants will explore ideas of beauty through hands-on activities, music, lyrics, media images and social media.

I) Science Genius  (REASSIGNED TO BE AN ELEMENTARY WORKSHOP)

Teenat Khan, Suzana Shebib, TDSB

Students will be introduced to the competition of Science Genius through participating in a variety of activities where they will create rap pieces utilizing their current science knowledge. This workshop will promote critical thinking about the exploration of scientific concepts and terminology, while engaging students in a form of experiential education to highlight how science can be engaging and culturally relevant.

Students will work with two science teachers to provide hands on support with creating rhymes and will participate in a mini cypher at the end of the workshop to showcase their pieces and promote positivity and affirmations throughout the process.

J) Breakin’ Barriers

Nylda Gallardo-Lopez

“I am what I teach, and I teach what I live, that is, hip-hop.” Hip-hop is an art based on political and cultural revolution. It was created by the disenfranchised as a function of the despair, frustration, and immobility of poverty and street life. Hip-hop is often misrepresented by media, and thus, is often pigeon-holed by society solely as 'gangster rap music', hip-hop is, in fact, its own subculture. It is a way of life that reinforces respect, the development of confidence, and originality. These qualities set the foundation of our cultural dance, known as "breakdancing".

My work aims to give students the tools to not only understand and appreciate the culture, but to affect it. Students are taught to interpret sound and emotion and make them manifest in movement. Through such practice, they gain strength of self in both mentally and physically. Hip-hop has given me the tools to build on my strengths, as a person and as a dancer. I prove women to be capable and powerful beyond gender discrimination and this pride of accomplishment is a valuable lesson for my students.

Break dancing is a physically challenging and complex dance form, requiring great discipline and commitment. My work is very effective in communicating and enforcing positive values, by employing a music and culture that already has a large influence in youth lifestyle.

K) Playlist Soundclash

Arifah Yusuf, Angellika "Jelly" Smith, Lifted by Purpose

Students will work in groups on a playlist based on themes provided by our team.  The playlist developed by each team will be used for a soundclash battle followed by a group conversation on the tracks that are picked. The themes used will address social injustice, mental health, violence and relationships. The event will be streamed live on our instagram page, where voting will take place to choose a winner of the playlist soundclash.  Two judges, well versed in music will also be present during workshop.  The students of each workshop will be invited to compete for a prize at a future Soundclash battle hosted by Lifted by Purpose.

L) #UNDRESSEDCODES

Juma Inniss, The Message

Hip-hop fashion is an important source of identity and a vehicle for creative and cultural expression for urban youth. #UNDRESSEDCODES examines the hip-hop element of street fashion to understand how it can be used as a tool for the socioeconomic empowerment or exclusion of marginalized youth. In this workshop students will practice critical inquiry and problem solving skills essential to STEM learning. They will analyze, evaluate, and critique the fashion choices of popular rappers, singers, athletes, and public figures through an interactive game show format. Participants will be engaged in spirited dialogue and thoughtful debate with one another as they interpret fashion cues and codes, and their implications for the socioeconomic mobility of under resourced youth.

M) Hip Hop Tech (REASSIGNED TO BE AN ELEMENTARY WORKSHOP)

Tesfai Mengesha, Sam Tecle, SBL Youth, Success Beyond Limits

This workshop will explore the history of Hip Hop culture with a focus on its humble beginnings. Connections will be made between the resources needed to participate in Hip Hop culture and the decades of the 1970s and 1980s. The history of DJing and MCing will be explored with a focus on the role technology has played in shaping Hip Hop culture. This presentation will highlight the creative, technical innovations ushered in by Hip Hop practitioners with respect to scratching, mixing and sampling. The technology used to create Hip Hop music has been novel and innovative. The wide ranging accessibility of hip hop both in content and culture as a genre speaks to its intrinsic appeal for social justice.  Attendees will be called on to interact and contribute throughout the presentation.

N) The Art of Resistance with Canada's Krump and Hip Hop Dance Team BUCC N FLVR (Flavor)

Lyn Rose Santos, Sandra Perez, Ben Santos, Ryan Dela Cruz, Bucc N Flvr Dance

Krump and Hip Hop dance can be used as a medium to free ourselves from oppression. With a popular education approach, our facilitators will engage our participants in an artistic developmental laboratory, where applying theory into action takes the form of Krump and Hip Hop Dance. Students will learn about Toronto's Krump and Hip-Hop Dance movement. They will have the opportunity to perform and enquire the relationship between the 'Resistance' in mind and body awareness, and 'Resisting' hegemonic culture.

From CBC to Much Music, working with indigenous youth and communities nationally and internationally , it is our responsibility to utilize art to foster social consciousness and move toward more collective actions with the intent to nurture social change.

O) Beats, Records, and Social Justice

Joseph Galiwango, TDSB

This workshop , for secondary students, will turn the classroom into a studio and think tank.  This workshop will combine 21st century music production skills, which students currently engage in, with analog records that contain messages of social justice from past eras.  In the lesson, the students will be forced to critically deconstruct social justice songs from artists past artist such Lillian Allen, Bob Marley, Gil Scott Heron, and Mutabaruka.  They will then use music production skills to write and record a new remix to the songs they have critically listened to in the class.

This workshop uses hip-hop pedagogy to teach students about technology that connects current music production with critical thinking about social justice in music from past generations.  This workshop goes beyond just beat making and DJing because each step is based on critical thinking, writing, and analysis of classic social justice narratives,

P) Hip Hop / STEM Fair (open to elementary and secondary students)

Various Artists/Educators

The STEM Fair is an open space marketplace where students will have access to various STEM activities that explore the use of technology as it relates to Hip Hop music and culture.

Station

Facilitator

Location

I

Words, Rhymes, Flows

Motion

Front Hallway left of auditorium

II

Robotics

Kidder

Front Hallway right of auditorium

III

Live Graffiti Art

Danilo

Stage Right

IV

DJing

Power

Stage Left

V

Beatboxing

Unity Charity

Small Gym

VI

Breakdancing

Unity Charity

Small Gym

VII

Robotics

Moe Perera

Chris Johannesen

Small Gym