EDUCATION

2011

Ed.D. in English Education. Teachers College, Columbia University. New York, New York.

2003

M.A. in the Teaching of English. Teachers College, Columbia University.  New York, New York.

Permanent New York State Teaching Certification, 7-12 English.

2002

B.A. in Philosophy and English. Fordham University. New York, New York. Summa Cum Laude. Honors in Philosophy.

1998 to 1999

Transferred. The Catholic University of America. Washington, D.C.

EXPERIENCE

2018 to Present

Associate Professor of Educational Technology, Pace University, School of Education. Securing contracts for books on digital research methods and computer science education in K-12 settings. Building a community of English educators and teachers to support the exploration of computer science in ELA classrooms and teacher preparation. Teaching courses in English methods, educational technology, content-area literacy, the foundations of education, and computer science education. Serving on Steering Committee.

2018 to Present

Faculty Lead for Innovation, Pace University, School of Education. Led visioning and strategic planning with faculty and leadership. Implementing technology infrastructure for recruitment, retention, and ongoing relationship building with field, including CRM and cloud-based solutions. Integrating computer science education into all programs in collaboration with faculty. Representing faculty perspective at senior-level meetings as needed.

2016 to Present

Co-director, Babble Lab: A Center for Digital Humanities Pedagogy and Research, Pace University. Secured $20,000 in internal funding to establish a digital humanities pedagogy hub within the university. Designed K-12 prototype assignments called mixed literary analyses and Bardbots. Co-organized 25 events, engaged 350 undergraduates, collaborated with 16 courses, worked with 24 faculty, exchanged ideas with 13 external institutions, and submitted 6 external funding applications.

2012 to 2018

Assistant Professor of Educational Technology, Pace University, School of Education. Researched the application of software theory to educational research, with emphasis on literacy practices, education reform, teacher education, and K-12 computer science education. Produced 8 double-blind peer review articles, 21 unblinded peer review publications, 3 book chapters, 1 book published by Routledge, 23 double-blind peer review presentations and workshops, and 17 invited presentations and workshops. Coordinated Educational Technology Specialist program.

2017 to Present

Co-founder, Room 7. Created an international consortium of over one dozen coding schools throughout Europe and the Middle East committed to sharing best practices. Facilitated the creation and finalizing of a Memorandum of Understanding. Established a website to communicate the work more broadly and to support fundraising.

2012 to Present

Consultant. Working with leading educational organizations to identify literacy and technology needs areas in order to strategize and implement solutions that honor the complexity of teaching and learning. Clients include the New York City Department of Education, New Visions for Public Schools, Institute of Play, and Intel.

2012 to 2015

Adviser, New York City Department of Education (Division of Teaching and Learning). Strategized, designed, and supported the implementation of a large-scale online/blended professional development ecosystem for the district’s 80,000 teachers. Secured $5M in philanthropic funding.

2012

Innovative Literacies Specialist, New York City Department of Education (Division of Academics and Performance). Supported the city’s teachers in understanding and integrating the Common Core literacy standards. Designed and piloted technology-supported approaches to large-scale online professional development. Secured $1.8M in philanthropic funding.

2010 to 2011

Director of Implementation, New York City Department of Education (Division of Talent, Labor, and Innovation). Led a team of 10 implementation managers in supporting over 100 schools implement online learning models with K-12 students as part of iLearnNYC, an initiative in the district’s Innovation Zone (iZone). Brokered conversations between IT teams and educational business owners.

2009 to 2010

Implementation Manager, New York City Department of Education (Division of Talent, Labor, and Innovation). Supported a dozen schools in identifying meaningful ways to integrate online learning into their curriculum, working closely with school leadership, teachers, and students.

 2003 to 2009

English Teacher and Educational Technology Coordinator, New York City Lab School for Collaborative Studies. Designed project-based learning experiences for and with 9th and 12th grade students.  Coached colleagues in the use of instructional technologies and advised school leadership on technology strategy for instruction, operations, and communications.

PUBLICATIONS

Books

1

Lynch, T.L. (2015). The hidden role of software in educational research: Policy to practice.  New York: Routledge.

Articles

Double-Blind Review

 

12

Lynch, T. L. & Gerber, H. R. (2018). The ontological imperative when researching in the digital age.  International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 10(1), 1-12.

11

Lynch, T.L. (2017). How English teachers will save the future: Re-imagining computer science as the language art it is. STEM Journal, 18(4), 163-179.

10

Behizadeh, N. & Lynch, T.L. (2017). Righting technology: How large-scale assessments can foster a more equitable education system through epistemological negotiation. Berkeley Review of Education, 7(1), 25-47.

9

Gerber, H. & Lynch, T.L.  (2016). Into the meta: Research methods for moving beyond social media surfacing. Tech Trends, DOI: 10.1007/s11528-016-0140-6.

8

Lynch, T. L. (2015). Where the machine stops: Software as reader and the rise of new literatures. Research in the Teaching of English, 49(3), 297-304.

7

Lynch, T. L. (2015). Software's smile: A critical software analysis of an educational technology specialist program. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 15(4), 600-616.

6

Musti-Rao, S., Lynch, T.L., & Plati, E.  (2015). Training for fluency and generalization of math facts using technology.  Intervention in School and Clinic, 51(2), 112-117.

5

Lynch, T. L. (2014). The imponderable bloom: A multimodal social semiotic study of the role of software in teaching literature in a secondary online English course.  Changing English, 21(1), 42-52.

4

Lynch, T. L. (2009). The uselessness of literature: Why new literacies will end the teaching of literature. California English, 14(5), 12-15.

3

Lynch, T. L. (2009). Re-reader response: The illusion of teaching literature. The English Record, 59(2), 40-47.

2

Lynch, T. L. (2008). Re-readings and literacy: How second readings might open third spaces. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 52(4), 334-341.

1

Lynch, T. L. (2007). Illuminating Chaucer through poetry, manuscript illuminations and a critical rap album. English Journal, 96(6), 43-49.

Articles

Unblinded Peer Review & Invited

21

Lynch, T. L. & Gerber, H. R. (2017). Introduction to the special issue.  Educational Media International, 54(4), 1-6.

20

Lynch, T.L. (2017). Mr. Browne’s final lesson is on infinity. English Journal, 107(1), 91-92.

19

Lynch, T.L. (2017). Babble labs: Reimagining English class for a multimodal world. English Journal, 107(1), 96-98.

18

Lynch, T.L. (2017). Below the screen: Why multiliteracies research needs to embrace software. English Journal, 106(3), 92-94.

17

Lynch, T.L. (2016). Pedagogy’s patents: Opening the door on technology’s history in our classrooms. English Journal, 106(2), 105-106.

16

Lynch, T.L. (2016). Woodless and wired: How digital learning scars the earth and what to do. English Journal, 106(1), 73-75.

15

Lynch, T.L. (2016). Saving computer science education from itself. English Journal, 105(6), 101-103.

14

Lynch, T.L. (2016). Letters to the machine: Why computer programming belongs in the English classroom. English Journal, 105(5), 95-97.

13

Lynch, T.L. (2016). Readers of ones and zeros: A case for K-12 digital humanities education. English Journal, 105(4), 111-113.

12

Lynch, T.L. (2016). As blankness falls: How data shape the relationships between students, teachers, and the public. English Journal, 105(3), 98-100.

11

Lynch, T.L. (2015). Inquiry in an age of query. English Journal, 105(2), 126-128.  

10

Lynch, T.L. (2015).  Mustard seeds and information feeds: A short history of students as data. English Journal, 105(1), 96-98.

9

Lynch, T.L. (2015).  Counting characters: Quantitative approaches to literary study. English Journal, 104(6), 71-74.

8

Lynch, T.L. (2015). Spreadsheets and sinners: How and why English teachers can claim their rightful place in STEM education.  English Journal, 104(5), 98-101.  

7

Lynch, T. L. (2015). Feeling Walt Whitman: Introducing new literatures and the use of data visualization to interpret poetry. English Journal, 104(4), 100-102. 

6

Lynch, T.L. (2015). Reassessing how we “see” students: The blessing and blight of rubrics (and software) in education.  English Journal, 104(3), 88-90.

5

Lynch, T.L. (2014). Bards at bat: The sport of quantitative literary analysis. English Journal, 104(1), 89-91.  

4

Lynch, T. L. (2014). Book review: Software takes command by Lev Manovich. Research in Review Blog (online), International Association of K-12 Online Learning Research (iNACOL).  Retrieved from http://www.inacol.org/news/guest-blogger-tom-lynch-reviews-software-takes-command-by-lev-manovich/

3

Lynch, T.L. (2014.) Readers and writers rebooted: Teaching software to read the world. English Journal, 103(5), 86-88.

2

Lynch, T.L. (2013). …er than they are. Adventures in space with Henri Lefebvre. Philosophy Now, May/June, 27-30.  

1

Lynch, T. L. (2013). Pecs Soviet and the red underscore: Raising awareness of software’s role in our schools. English Journal, 103(1), 128–130.

Book Chapters

4

Lynch, T.L. (2017). (Un)Just lists: How to understand and communicate the problems of data-driven education. In Abrams, S.S., Chen, X., and Downton, M.P. (Eds.), Managing Educational Technology: School Partnerships & Technology Integration.

3

Lynch, T.L. (2015). Holy interfaces and the sanctity of software: A critical software analysis of rubrics as vehicles of reform.  In M. Tenam-Zemach & J. Flynn (Eds.), A rubric nation: A reader on the utility and impact of rubrics in education (pp. 125-141). Charlotte, North Carolina: Information Age Publishing.

2

Lynch, T. L. (2013). The secretary and the software: On the need for integrating software analysis into educational spaces. In J. Gorlewski & B. Porfilio (Eds.), Left behind in the race to the top (pp. 129-142). Charlotte, North Carolina: Information Age Publishing.

1

Lynch, T. L., & McKibbin, K. (2010). When writers imagine readers: How writing for publication affects students' sense of responsibility to readers. In P. Sullivan, H. Tinberg, & S. Blau (Eds.), What is “college-level” writing? volume 2: Assignments, readings, and student writing samples (online). Urbana, Illinois: NCTE.

Works in Progress

5

Brass, J. & Lynch, T.L. (under preparation). A critical-historical analysis of personalized learning in the United States.

4

Mayorga, E. & Lynch, T.L. (under revision). Feeding souls: A critical analysis of how accountability data structures the life out of children, community, and cultures.

3

Lynch, T.L. (under revision). Telltale languages resound: A narrative inquiry into using software to teach literature. 

2

Lynch, T.L & Musti, S. (under review). The opportunity gap app: Why addressing technological inequity is essential to supporting learning and social inclusion.

1

Musti-Rao, S. & Lynch, T.L. (under revision). Culturally responsive literacy instruction for students with special needs: Implications for best practice.  In S. Kim (Ed.), ESL education: Current issues and research-based teaching practices.

Dissertation

Lynch, T.L. (2011). The Tweed effect: Theorizing the rise of online learning in New York City public schools (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Teachers College, Columbia University. New York, New York.

PRESENTATIONS

Double-Blind Review Conferences

31

Lynch, T.L. (2018, November). Fostering Computational Literacy for Student Empowerment: Why computer science belongs in the English classroom and how to get started. Presenter. National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. Houston, Texas.

30

Lynch, T.L. & Amendola, P. (2018, November). Is This a Robot Which I See Before Me? Shakespeare, Coding, and Raising Students' Computational Voices. Presenter. In Raising the Voices of Teacher Educators through Digital Literacies. National Council of Teachers of English Annual Conference. Houston, Texas.

29

Lynch, T.L. (2017, June). (Re)Envisoning our beliefs about technology and the preparation of English teachers, Part 2.  Presenter. Conference on English Education Biennial Conference. Columbus, Ohio.

28

Lynch, T.L. (2017, June). Cultivating equity across contexts: Social justice with teacher candidates, secondary students, and inservice teachers.  Presenter. Conference on English Education Biennial Conference. Columbus, Ohio.

27

Lynch, T.L. (2017, April). Literacies unseen: Why the sub-screenic world of computer code, data, and algorithms demands literacy researchers’ attention. Presenter. In Interrogating the Multiple Meanings of Digital Literacies. American Educational Research Association Annual Conference. San Antonio, Texas.

26

Lynch, T.L., Weinraub, M., Kamdar, V., & Frumin, K. (2017, March). Wired for job-embedded online learning. SXSWedu. Austin, Texas.

25

Gerber, H. & Lynch, T.L. (2017, March). New research methods for new times: Mixing social media analytics with qualitative methods. Workshop presenter. Mixed Methods International Research Association Annual Conference. Montego Bay, Jamaica.  

24

Lynch, T.L. (2016, November). How teachers learn to code: What the teaching of coding can learn from the teaching of writing. Presenter. In Advocating for New Literacies and Technology in Classrooms and Communities. Roundtable presenter. National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. Atlanta, Georgia.

23

Behizadeh, N. & Lynch, T.L. (2016, November). Reforming high-stakes, large-scale assessment practices though a policy of negotiated control.  Presenter. International Conference on Urban Education. San Juan, Puerto Rico.

22

Lynch, T.L. (2016, April). Click to submit: The problems of “technology” in educational research and a case for critical software studies. Presenter. American Educational Research Association Annual Conference. Washington, D.C.

21

Lynch, T.L. (2015, November). Introducing new literatures: Quantitative analysis and data visualization in the teaching of literature. Presenter. National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. Minneapolis, Minnesota.

20

Lynch, T.L. & Behizadeh, N. (2015, July). Befriending the machine: The historical and future impact of technology on large-scale writing assessment in Re-thinking high stakes assessment in writing and teacher education.  Presenter. Conference on English Education Biennial Conference. New York, New York.

19

Lynch, T.L. (2015, July). Using data visualization to teach (the teaching of) content-area literacy in Reaching beyond traditional methods: New literacies and meaningful technology use in teacher education.  Presenter. Conference on English Education Biennial Conference. New York, New York.

18

Lynch, T.L. (2015, April). The sanctity of software in A rubric nation: Critical inquiries into the of rubrics on education. Presenter. American Educational Research Association Annual Convention. Chicago, Illinois.

17

Lynch, T.L. (2015, April). Righting technology: Theoretical misalignment and technological underperformance of large-scale writing assessment. Presenter. American Educational Research Association Annual Convention. Chicago, Illinois.

16

Lynch, T.L. (2014, December). Dialogic literacy practices. Chair. Literacy Research Association Annual Conference.  Marco Island, Florida.

15

Lynch, T.L. (2014, December). Click to submit: Introducing theory and methods from software studies to literacy research education. Presenter. Literacy Research Association Annual Conference.  Marco Island, Florida.  

14

Lynch, T.L. (2014, April). The power of “innovation” in education in the United States. Presenter. Global Learning Alliance Summit.  Teachers College, Columbia University. New York, New York.

13

Lynch, T.L. (2014, April). Multimodal miracles: The kinds of learning experiences videogames (and their developers) enable and inhibit. Panel presentation.  American Educational Research Association Annual Convention. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  

12

Lynch, T.L. (2014, April). A critical software analysis of rubrics as vehicles of conservative reform.  American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies Annual Convention. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

11

Lynch, T.L. (2013, December). Videogame communities, affinity spaces, and transformative learning: Fluid and connective literacy practices in online and offline spaces. Co-Chair.  Literacy Research Association Annual Conference.  Dallas, Texas.

10

Lynch, T.L. (2013, November). How software can and cannot help you teach English. In New Tools or New Practices?: (Re) Inventing the Future of English Classroom Spaces.  Roundtable Leader.  National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. Boston, Massachusetts.

9

Lynch, T.L. (2013, November). (Language) Arts and sciences: Strategies and concepts for enhancing our English curricula while supporting students’ science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) needs in an era of Common Core. Panel presentation.  National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. Boston, Massachusetts.

8

Lynch, T.L. (2013, July). The simple beauty of quantitative literary analysis through software. Presentation. Conference on English Education Biennial Conference.  Fort Collins, Colorado.

7

Lynch, T.L. (2013, April). Becoming soft(a)ware: A framework for the critical analysis of educational software.  Panel presentation.  American Educational Research Association Annual Convention. San Francisco, California.  

6

Lynch, T.L. (2010, November).  English Companion Ning and the rise of professional development 2.0.  Panel presentation.  National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. Orlando, Florida.

5

Lynch, T.L. (2009, April). The Uselessness of literature: How new literacies will end the teaching of literature. Paper presentation, Teachers College Educational Technology Conference. New York, New York.

4

Lynch, T.L. (2009, November). Re-reading as a method: Why some students don’t really read. Presenter.  National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

3

Lynch, T.L. (2009, November). Embedding publication: The crucial link between reading and writing processes.  Respondent.  National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

2

Lynch, T.L. (2008, November). New definitions of text and new ways of publishing: Rap, podcasts, and online publishing.  Presenter. National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention.  San Antonio, Texas.

1

Lynch, T.L. (2008, November). The new autobiographic genre. Panelist. National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention.  San Antonio, Texas.

Invited Talks and Workshops

21

Lynch, T.L. (2018, September). Reading between the lines (of code): Why and how to teach coding in the humanities. e-Learning Korea 2018. Korean Ministry of Education/KERIS. COEX, Seoul, Korea.

20

Kreitz, K. & Lynch, T.L. (2017, December). Read against the machine: Literary study in the computational age. Invited presentation in LIT205: Introduction to Literature, Culture, and Media. Pace University. New York, New York.

19

Lynch, T.L. (2017, November). A conversation about embedding computer science into the humanities. Virtual presenter. Doctoral seminar, Sam Houston State University. Houston, Texas.

18

Lynch, T.L. (2017, September). How English teachers will save the future: Re-imagining computer science as the literacy practice it is. Media, Multimedia, and Secondary English Education (MMSEE) Joint International Conference. Gyeongin National University of Education, Incheon, South Korea.

17

Gerber, H. & Lynch, T.L. (2017, August). Qualitative research in computational times: Dilemmas of data gone digital. Virtual presenter. International Institute for Qualitative Methodology, University of Alberta. Alberta, Canada.  

16

Lynch, T.L. (2017, March). Moby data: Using computer science to study literature. Undergraduate Community Meeting. Pace University. New York, New York.

15

Lynch, T.L. (2016, February). 3X3s: A blended model for giving & getting efficient feedback. Best Practices Conference. Pace University. New York, New York.

14

Lynch, T.L. (2016, February). Seeing red: Hi- and low-tech methods for giving better feedback to student writing.  Collaborative Inquiry for Teaching and Learning Network Day. Teacher Leader Quality Partnership Grant. Pace University. Pleasantville, New York.

13

Lynch, T.L. (2016, February/March). We don't know what our writing does: Why we should teach and learn about languages, not technology. Pace Path 4PD Lecture Series. Pace University. New York, New York.

12

Lynch, T.L. (2015, October). Dis/embodied language/s: A critical software analysis of U.S. education reform. Code Acts in Education Conference. University of Bristol.  Bristol, United Kingdom.

11

Lynch, T. L. (2015, August). What distance makes us see: A critical software analysis of current large-scale assessment practices in the United States. Global Capacities Summer Institute, Center for the Professional Education of Teachers.  Teachers College, Columbia University. New York, New York.

10

Lynch, T.L. (2014, May). Data governance: The foundation for data quality and effective data use. Panelist. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Conference on using data and technology to improve teaching. Denver, Colorado.

9

Lynch, T.L. (2014, February). Distant writing methods and inquiry.  Collaborative Inquiry for Teaching and Learning Network Day.  Teacher Leader Quality Partnership Grant. Pace University. White Plains, New York.

8

Lynch, T.L. (2013, September). A standards story: An informative and critical look at the Common Core Standards, Danielson Framework, and the future of teaching English in our public schools. Invited talk and workshop. Teachers College, Columbia University. New York, New York.

7

Lynch, T.L. (2013, June). Strategies for deepening reading and writing across content-areas through technology. Talk and workshop. Institute for Student Achievement Annual Summer Institute. Uniondale, New York.

6

Lynch, T.L. (2012, December). Multimodal composition: Leveraging software in teaching writing. Invited talk and workshop. Teachers College, Columbia University. New York, New York.

5

Lynch, T.L. (2012, November). Content-based arguments in ELA, LOTE, and the arts. Collaborative Inquiry for Teaching and Learning Network Day.  Teacher Leader Quality Partnership Grant. Pace University. White Plains, New York.

4

Lynch, T.L. (2012, November). The Common Core Standards and teaching English. Invited talk and workshop. Teachers College, Columbia University. New York, New York.

3

Lynch, T.L. (2011, July). Reading bytes: Reconsidering what it means to read literary and informational texts in online and blended environments. Invited talk. English Companion Ning Webstitute. Virtual.

2

Lynch, T.L. (2011, July).  The Tweed effect: A theory of action for implementing online learning in our schools. Invited talk.  Principals Conference, Grampians Region, Department of Education. Victoria, Australia.

1

Frumin, K. and Lynch, T.L. (2010, March). A blended learning model case study [in New York City].  Panel presentation. WNET’s Celebration of Teaching and Learning. New York, New York.

EXTERNAL FUNDING

Awarded Grants and Contracts

9/1/2016 to 6/30/2016

$20,000. Grant | Co-PI. Awarded to Drs. Kelley Kreitz and Tom Liam Lynch by Pace University for establishment of Babble Lab, which examines models for digital humanities pedagogy at both the university and K-12 levels.  

9/1/2014 to 5/31/2015

$20,000. Contract | Lead investigator. Awarded to the Pace University School of Education by the NYC Department of Education to evaluate the impact of WeTeachNYC online/blended professional development program on participants’ classroom practice.

1/1/2014 to 12/31/2016

$5,000,000. Innovative Professional Development (iPD). Grant | Grant writer. Awarded to the Office of Achievement Resources, NYC Department of Education by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.  My role was to design and co-author a proposal and budget to scale citywide the previous iPD grant while integrating teacher quality data and partnerships with national professional organizations.  

4/14/2013 to 12/15/2013

$4,421. Provost Grants for the Thinkfinity Initiative. Grant | Co-PI (with Dr. Shobana Musti-Rao). Awarded by Pace University in order to study the effects of supplemental math instruction delivered via iPad on second-grade students’ computation and problem-solving skills.

9/1/2012 to 12/31/2013

$1,815,810.  Innovative Professional Development (iPD). Grant | Grant writer. Awarded to the Fund for Public Schools, NYC Department of Education by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.  My role was to design and co-author a pilot-scale professional development strategy that leveraged the district’s learning management system, preexistent data systems (at the local, state, and national level), and multiple learning object repositories in a manner that complemented national reform efforts.

Pending and Unfunded

$891,036. National Science Foundation STEM+C. Unfunded. Principal Investigator. Proposal entitled, “Babble Labs: Expanding Access to Middle School Computer Science through English Language Arts Class.”

$30,000. NEH Digital Humanities Start-Up. Unfunded. Project Co-Director.  Proposal to create a detailed functionality specifications document to frame the feasibility of an open-source enterprise-level document management system to facilitate district-level writing process assessment.

$1,183,460. Pace ITEST. Unfunded.  Proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the creation of an after-school and summer series for middle school science students and teachers to immerse them in STEM learning, including Scratch software, robotics, and community-driven app development.

$100,000.  Blended Learning Institute. Unfunded. Proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF) for funding to host summer and intersession conferences for regional alternative certification science teachers to explore blended learning techniques and curriculum development.

$2,796,274. Pathways in Technology Early College High Schools (P-Tech).  Unfunded.  Proposal to the State of New York for funding to partner with a regional school district and business to create a 9-14 program from which students would graduate with an Associate’s degree from Pace University in a technology field.  

SERVICE, INVOLVEMENT, and HONORS

Service

2017

Guest Editor. Special Issue of Educational Media International, 54(4). With Dr. Hannah R. Gerber.

2017 to Present

Member. Student Engagement and Retention Committee. Pace University.

2017 to Present

Member. Faculty Center Advisory Board. Pace University.

2017

Expert Contributor. UNESCO Mobile Learning Week: ICEM-UNESCO Strategy Lab. Paris, France.

2016 to Present

Member. Steering Committee. Pace University, School of Education.

2016 to Present

Member. Online Learning Planning Committee. Pace University, Cross-Departmental.

2013 to Present

Informal mentor to doctoral students in educational technology, critical literacy studies, and English education.

2013 to Present

Chair. Curriculum Committee. Pace University, School of Education.  Establishing clear processes for course and program change approval.

2013 to Present

Member. University Curriculum Committee. Pace University.

2013 to Present

Member. Dean’s Scholarly Research Committee.  2013 to Present

2012 to 2013

Search Chair. Pace University, School of Education.  National search for tenure-track STEM professor.

2012 to Present

Member. Adolescent Education Committee. Pace University, School of Education.

2013

Member. Curriculum Committee. Pace University, School of Education.

2012 to Present

Program Coordinator. Education Technology Program. Pace University, School of Education. Refined and led a Master’s & Certification program with forty students, including updating of courses, establishment of a student-driven eCommunity, and offering of new revenue streams for the program.

2013

Field Research Lead. Pace University, School of Education.  Served as university lead for national study of the use of avatar software for professional development of teachers. University of Central Florida (PI) funded through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Involvement

Academic

2018 to Present

Elected Representative. Nominating Committee, Conference for English Education (CEE), National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

2017 to Present

Editorial Board. International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches.

2017 to Present

Member. Editorial Board for Gaming Ecologies and Pedagogies book series published by Sense Publishing.

2015

Guest Reviewer. Teachers College Record: Special Issue of Virtual Convergence.

2015 to Present

Conference Proposal Reviewer. American Educational Research Association, Division K.

2014 to Present

Reviewer. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education.

2014 to Present

Reviewer. English Education.

2014 to Present

Reviewer. Research in the Teaching of English.

2014 to Present

Reviewer. Asia Pacific Journal of Education.  

2012 to Present

Reviewer. English Journal.  

2013 to 2018

Column Editor, English Journal. “Soft(a)ware: Instructional technologies in the English classroom.”

2012 to Present

Member. Commission on Digital Literacies and Teacher Education.  NCTE, CEE.

Involvement

Public

July, 2017

“States of Education,” an interactive mapping visualization that allows the public to see how their state constitutions frame the purpose of public education. www.gradgrinds.com/states-of-education

2017

Room 7, a consortium of international organizations that provide computer science training to refugees, which I initiated at Mobile Learning Week at UNESCO in Paris and that is managed in partnership with Josephine Goube of TechFugees. www.room7.org

2016 to Present

Babble Lab, a center for digital humanities pedagogy and research at Pace University, co-founded with Dr. Kelley Kreitz, which systematically explores approaches to improving and expanding the use of computational and digital methods in the service of humanistic inquiry. www.babblelab.org

2016 to Present

Gradgrind’s, a website I created and maintain, which is devoted to “making education public” by curating digital artifacts about education’s history, culture, and scholarship. www.gradgrinds.com

March, 2016

Interview on Fox 5 about the place of technology in American education.

July, 2015

“Are We Investing in History Repeating Itself?” an analysis of trends in educational technology investment commissioned by Medium.com.

Honors

2018

Recipient. National Technology Leadership Initiative (NTLI) Award. English Language Arts Teacher Educators (ELATE), National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

2007

Honorable Mention for the Paul & Kate Farmer Award. Given for outstanding article in English Journal, National Council of the Teachers of English.

2007

Recipient of the Walter Sindlinger Writing Award, Teachers College, Columbia University.

2006

National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute Fellow. “Paradise Lost and the Contemporary Reader.”

2005

New Visions Fellow. Awarded grant to study oral history in Ireland and Northern Ireland.

COURSES TAUGHT/DESIGNED

EDG 610: General Methods in Inclusive Adolescent Classrooms. Pace University.

EDU 696M: Computer Science for Teachers. Pace University.

EDU 696H: Quantitative Text Analysis and Data Visualization for Teachers and Students. Pace University.

EDU 696K: Critical Approaches to Educational Technology. Pace University.

ED 641: Secondary Methods: Making English Meaningful, 7-12. Pace University.

ED 616: Learning Online: Curriculum, Instruction, and Implementation Design. Pace University.

ED 656: Literacy in the Content-Areas. Pace University.

ED 616: Curriculum Development & Planning with Technology. Pace University.

ED 690: Teacher as Researcher. Pace University.

ED 633: Foundations of Education. Pace University.

A&HE 4151: Teaching of Writing. Teachers College, Columbia University.

A&HE 4051: Critical Approaches to Literature. Teachers College, Columbia University.

A&HE 4557: Seminar on Student Teaching. Teachers College, Columbia University.