Nendoroid General Information Guide

"Nendoroids are proof of popularity ... I want to be a Nendoroid." — Miss Monochrome

Welcome to the unofficial /toy/ Nendoroid information document! This is an in-progress guide for allocating various kinds of information, from care, to where to purchase, to release dates. If you would like to request an addition to the guide please email me at temporaltactician@gmail.com.

Table of Contents:

  1. What is a Nendoroid?
  2. What is a Nendoroid Petite?
  3. Where do I buy them?
  4. How do I tell if I have a bootleg?
  5. Announced figures and release info
  6. External sources/Links to more Nendo info
  7. Joint/peg tightening tutorial

What is a Nendoroid?

Well, if you ask Google you will get:

The Nendoroid (ねんどろいど, nendoroido) series is a brand of plastic figures, 10 cm tall, created by the Japanese Good Smile Company in 2006. Nendoroid figures are usually based on the characters from anime, manga or video games and designed with a large head and smaller body to give them a cute appearance.”

This is a good starting place. Nendoroids are made of PVC/ABS and are painted- not cast in the various different colors. Each figure typically has at least a small level of detail hand-painted, so there may be slight variations. The only real joints are located in the neck and hips. This means that the articulation is incredibly limited, but most kits come with TONS of extra parts to swap out for creating a variety of poses. Most Nendoroids cannot stand on their own due to their proportions, but the figures are bundled with some kind of support system, whether it’s a clear acrylic base or a multi-jointed arm. A regular Nendo will run you between 3500 and 4000 yen before shipping and other charges. Some have extra parts (Elise from Fire Emblem Fates comes with a horse) which can raise the price, and others have less face plates (Love live Nendoroids are like this to lower the cost of completing the set) and other accessories to keep the price low.

What is a Nendoroid Petite?

As the name infers it is indeed a smaller version of a Nendoroid. Clocking in at about 6 cm (just over two inches) tall they are figures that are scaled down Nendoroids in every aspect (detail, number of accessories, articulation, price, etc.). They are also often released in sets so that they can fill out the entire cast of a series.

Where do I buy Nendoroids?

The short answer is anywhere you would buy other figures from the East. Here is a small list of frequently used vendors:

http://www.amiami.com/

http://www.hlj.com/

http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/

http://goodsmile-global.ecq.sc/

http://biginjap.com/

http://www.nippon-yasan.com/

http://ekizo.mandarake.co.jp/shop/en/

http://global.rakuten.com/en/

GSC also has several "partner" shops. They have a list at http://partner.goodsmile.info/support/eng/partnershops/ so you can find a place to shop in your region. If you live in the US I have some personal recommendations:

http://www.kirinhobby.com/shop/

http://otakumode.com

http://www.rightstufanime.com

http://www.anime-island.com

How do I tell if I have a fake/bootleg?

This is a somewhat difficult question to answer as there are many ways, but just because  you have one sign that may point to it being fake does not make it so. Good Smile Company has a list of known counterfeits, but if you're questioning a purchase this guide might help:

http://nyotaku.com/2012/11/25/how-to-spot-a-fake-nendoroid/

Preorder info and announced kits

The people that start these threads apparently never look at this, and they keep labeling this doc as having “product release info” despite there being no such information here. I’ve given up on updating this section, because I just can’t keep up with all of the announcements, releases, push-backs, re-releases, etc. so here is the official running list of releases direct from GSC. Also, lots of people in the thread post this info so you have a couple of options.

http://www.goodsmile.info/en/products/category/nendoroid_series/released/2015

Other links/misc. stuff

If you want any websites to follow there are a few I check regularly:

http://myfigurecollection.net/ obviously a bit more broad than just Nendoroids, but the galleries can be useful on deciding on a kit if you’re deliberating

http://nendonesia.com/ is a fun little nendo blog

http://goodsmilecompanyus.tumblr.com/ is GSC’s “offical” english speaking correspondance hub. It’s basically a place for asking them questions, and getting the occasional news update

http://mikatan.goodsmile.info/en/ another official GSC blog, but this one is aimed toward featuring new products. It gets translated to English by hand so that isn't just a bunch of mangled thoughts.

Joint tightening tutorial

I’ve noticed a ton of people complaining about loose back pegs, arm joints, and the entire CCS Nendo. There are dozens of guides that will say the exact same thing in other generals, but why not have it here too?

Okay, so the goal is to:

  1. Increase the outer diameter of the male side of the connection

AND/OR

     2.  Decrease the inner diameter of the female side of the connection

This process is way more simple than it seems. The only things you will need are:

Future is a clear acrylic polish. Being acrylic it is entirely safe on other paints and materials, as well as being completely harmless on skin and to smell. The “fumes” are from the added perfume. (the smell goes away in a few days) It looks something like this nowadays:

Getting the supplies is the hardest part. Future can be tricky to find depending on where you live, but if all else fails just get it online. It should run you less than 10 USD.

Steps for actually fixing loose joints and connections:

  1. Soak the tip of a cotton bud in future, or use the aforementioned paint brush if you want to be fancy.
  2. Apply Future liberally to both the male and female sides of the connection.
  3. Connect both sides of the joint and wiggle that shit around in socket. You should see some excess Future being pushed out if you added enough. If you don’t see any then you didn’t add enough, and you likely have dry pockets inside the joint. Just add some more and repeat.
  4. Separate the joints.
  5. Using another cotton bud, a tissue, or a paper towel clean up the excess Future that overflowed. It will wipe up easily, and will not harm the paint if it makes contact, so don’t worry about not being gentle when wiping.
  6. Let the parts dry separately. There is a bit of dispute on how long you should wait. The parts should be dry to the touch in a few hours, I personally wait 24 hours, and other people say you should wait the full acrylic curing time (3-5 days). Do what you want, if you ruin anything you can just do it over again.
  7. Voila, enjoy your snug fitting and flowery scented parts!