Fall 2017 GLS Course Descriptions

Please note that course descriptions are for reference only and are subject to change.

Advanced Writing Studio

Approaches

Cultural Foundations I

Electives

Global Cultures

Global Topics

Global Writing Seminar

Senior Colloquium I

Senior Seminars

Social Foundations I


Advanced Writing Studio

AWS-UF 201.001 | TR 12:30pm-1:45pm | Chris Packard

International Shorts

Students in this course will examine short works (stories, essays, poems, films) in their historical and material contexts.  Students will also produce their own short works (stories, essays, poems, film scripts) and will seek publication or other appropriate public venues for them. What can be read in one sitting, looked at in a glance, or absorbed during a lunchbreak differs from longer works in form, obviously, but does it also differ in lastingness? Does shorter mean more ephemeral?  Magazines, not books, feature them; film festivals, not mainline cinema distributors, feature them. They are collected and bound together, rarely standing alone on a bookshelf or in a DVD case.  In formal citations, they get jailed in quotation marks, not emphasized in italics.  By design and distribution, shorts don’t live long, yet regions claim them as expressions of fixed national identities in a given moment of time, and literary histories elevate them to gems of an epoch. What correlations can be made between regional expressions of a local culture and international forms of compressed writing and short-duration films?  How has web publishing and streaming video changed the marketplace for short pieces of writing and film?


Approaches

APR-UF 201.001 | MW 9:30pm-10:45pm | Patricio Navia

Reform and Revolution: Social and Political Change in Developing Countries

This course analyzes theories of social and political change and applies them to 20th century experiences of reform and revolution in developing countries. Most developing nations have been historically marked by inequality. Political developments have been defined by the efforts to reduce inequality and bring about a better distribution of income and wealth. By focusing on the tension between revolution and reform, we will study existing theories of social, political and economic change and how the efforts to bring about change have played out in developing nations since the early 20th Students will be able to acquire additional analytical skills and comparative methodology that will be useful for their junior year experiences and for their fourth-year seminars. We will study theoretical contributions and analyze them in light of ongoing debates on the qualities and attributes of democracy and policies that foster economic development and social inclusion. As we apply those theories to understanding the social and political evolution in developing countries, students will strengthen their historical background and will be familiarized with the social and political evolution of that region since the early 20th century. Students will also learn to understand theories, develop testable hypotheses and actually test those hypotheses using historical data. Analyzing critically requires students to first understand how theories are built and how they are continuously tested as scholars apply them to real cases. The class will be of interest to those who want to understand what brings about social and political change and under what conditions the push for change takes the form of reform and under what circumstances it evolves into

revolution.


 Cultural Foundations I

CFI-UF 101.005 | MW 12:30-1:45 | Molly Martin

Course Description TBA

CFI-UF 101.013 | MW 2:00-3:15 | Lindsay Davies

Course Description TBA

CFI-UF 101.018 | TR 11:00-12:15 |  Nancy Reale

Course Description TBA

CFI-UF 101.021 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Afrodesia McCannon

Course Description TBA


Electives

Understanding Global Studies

INTGS-UF 101.001 |TR 11:00-12:15 | Afrodesia McCannon

Your Place in the Network: Theories of Globalization and Global Studies

This course introduces some of the most influential thinkers and key-concepts of  Global Studies.  “Global Studies” names the multi-disciplinary academic study of globalization. In its least   contentious sense, “globalization” refers to the rapidly developing and ever-deepening network   of interconnections and interdependencies that characterize contemporary life. What is hotly debated in Global Studies is less the empirical reality of globalization than its drivers, outcomes, and historical origins. Is globalization essentially an economic process or set of processes that has political and cultural implications, or a multi-dimensional set of processes for which no single social domain holds causal priority? Is “globalization” simply another word for “Westernization,” “Americanization,” or capitalism and its attendant ideologies? Did globalization begin in the last quarter century or several centuries ago or even several millennia? This course will examine answers made to these questions by such thinkers as Immanuel  Wallerstein, Anthony Giddens, Arjun Appaduria, Roland Roberston, Joseph Stiglitz, John Tomlinson, and Jan Nederveen Pieterse, and introduce such key-concepts as World-Systems  Analysis, Neoliberalism, Cosmopolitanism, Postnationalism, Deterriorialization, Glocalization, and Hybridity.


Global Cultures

AFRICAN GLOBAL CULTURES

AFGC-UF 101.001 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Ifeona Fulani

AFGC-UF 101.002 | TR 11:00-12:15 |  Ifeona Fulani

An Introduction to African Cultures: Questions of Representation

This course will introduce students to literature and film from Sub-Saharan Africa and, through our readings of the selected texts, to the social, cultural and political issues they reflect.  Our readings of fiction, non-fiction and films will be the starting point of our study of three main topics: (a) colonialism and the struggle of Africans for self-representation, (b) representations of contemporary socio-cultural developments and political conflicts and (c) contemporary issues of gender, sexuality and sexual politics. Throughout the course our discussions will also address two pervasive questions: how do African artists – writers and film-makers – effectively contest disparaging Western beliefs about, and portrayals of the continent? And how, if at all, do the texts we will consider negotiate differences between African and Western values?

CARIBBEAN GLOBAL CULTURES

CAGC-UF 101.001 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Ifeona Fulani

Islands in the Caribbean archipelago have been variously characterized as paradisical, the sites of wealth-producing plantations, the ideal Spring Break destination, even as staging posts for narcotics traders. Caribbean landscapes function as metaphor, emblem, symbol, or even characters. Landscape – and geography - is implicated in the ways the identities
of Caribbean states have been influenced by an accumulation of images, cultivated primarily by non-Caribbean individuals and agencies, including Columbus’ journal entries, the documentation of European colonial governments and settlers, the brochures travel agents and the fantasies of tourists. Often in conflict with the fantasy projections of others, Caribbean peoples face the ongoing challenge of reclaiming their islands and building their societies, still haunted by histories of slavery and colonialism, while still subjected to multiple forms of commodification, consumption and economic domination. Based on readings from literature, history and cultural studies, this course takes an interdisciplinary, transnational approach to unpacking connections between the histories of slavery, indentureship and European colonialism and the Caribbean’s current realities of inequality, internally – in particular inequalities of race and gender - and in its economic relations with the West. Questions addressed include: How have the residual legacies of slavery and colonization facilitated consumption in and of the Caribbean?  And what cultural resources and strengths are deployed or lost to migration?

LATIN AMERICAN GLOBAL CULTURES

LAGC-UF 101.002 | MW 9:30-10:45 | Patricio Navia

This course provides students with a general view of Latin American and the Caribbean. We study the region’s history, culture, arts, society, economy and recent political developments. Prior knowledge of Latin America is not required. In fact, because of the diversity within the region, some students familiar with one country will learn plenty about other countries. Latin America and the Caribbean is a diverse region with a wealth of different cultures, societies, economies and political systems. By providing a historical overview of the region during the first weeks, the class will build on that foundation to quickly reach 20 th -century and 21 st -century Latin America. We will also discuss Latinos in the U.S. The focus is generally historical, sociological, political and economic, but culture and the arts are also widely discussed.

LATIN AMERICAN GLOBAL CULTURES

LAGC-UF 101.003 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Luis Ramos

LAGC-UF 101.004 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Luis Ramos

It is often said that literature and politics are inextricably linked in Latin America. But how has literature helped shape political discourse in the region and how has politics, in turn, informed its literature and art? Drawing from a wide range of disciplines (literary criticism, history and political theory) and genres (poetry, fiction and the visual arts), in this course we will closely examine works that probe the boundary between politics and art under shifting historical conditions. We will begin by considering the origins of Latin American literature’s intimate relation to politics through works that recall the pre-colonial past or record indigenous rebellions against Spanish authorities. We will then turn to artists and writers who were instrumental in redefining the role of literature and art as revolutionary weapons or as instruments of nation-building in the independence era. Finally, we will examine works that probe the boundaries of the national body by casting a critical light on state violence in the twentieth-century. Among the leading questions that will inform class discussion: How has the political and aesthetic function of literature in Latin America changed over time? How has the intellectual historically assumed the role of agent or critic of the state? What do literature and art suggest about the relation between the state and its margins, between history and memory, and between elite and subaltern subjects?

MIDDLE EASTERN GLOBAL CULTURES

MEGC-UF 101.001 | MW 2:00-3:15 | Peter Valenti

MEGC-UF 101.002 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Peter Valenti

Course Description TBA

MIDDLE EASTERN GLOBAL CULTURES

MEGC-UF 101.002 | MW 12:30-1:45 | Shouleh Vatanabadi

This interdisciplinary course explores cultures, social institutions, political economies, and social change in contemporary Middle Eastern and North African societies. Using cultural studies as our critical framework we will examine historical and literary texts, as well as films and other artistic expressions to gain an understanding of the cultures and socio-political relations in this diverse region. We will begin with an examination of the early history of the region, starting with the rise of Islam and the pre-modern empires, moving on to discuss the complexities of the modern Middle East with a focus on such topics as colonialism, modernity and nationalism and the subsequent postcolonial complications. The course will incorporate contemporary media and popular culture of the region to provide a widespread perspective of the Middle East in a globalized and transnational world.

SOUTH ASIAN GLOBAL CULTURES

SAGC-UF 101.002 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Rochelle Almeida

SAGC-UF 101.003 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Rochelle Almeida

The goal of this course is to achieve a broad understanding of the contemporary politics, history, and culture of the Indian sub-continent (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka). Using a variety of literary texts, the dynamic relationship between tradition and modernity in the countries of South Asia will be examined. This course will take the pattern of lectures at each class that will introduce the historical and sociological contexts for the prescribed texts. This will be followed by a detailed discussion of the texts under consideration. Where possible and relevant, we will intersperse this pattern of classes with the viewing of films, video cassettes, news-clips, etc. Students are strongly urged to watch at least some of the films from the list below, in their own time, to enhance their understanding of the contemporary state of the Indian sub-continent.


Global Topics

GT-UF 201.001 | TR 9:30-11:00 |  Emily Bauman

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

NGO Narratives: Global Humanitarianism: From Development to Disaster

Starting in the late twentieth century the world began to see an explosion of what are categorized as non-governmental organizations. Fueled by the collapse of the Cold War, NGO's have emerged as a major third player in an international scene dominated by governmental and corporate bodies. Now, with the UN listing 40,000 registered and with unlisted NGOs numbering in the millions, we might say that we are living in the age of the NGO. Often thought of as “shadow governments,” NGOs address some of the key issues on the global arena: uneven development, refugees and internally displaced peoples, disaster relief, war, and famine, influencing international policy as well as directly impacting how nations manage these crises. They are at the heart of an expanding transnational civil society. This course looks at the literature associated with NGOs and the NGO experience, tracing the imagined and real encounters between disparate worlds that illuminate both the NGO mission and its allure. If in the nineteenth century the protest novel was one of the primary forms of aesthetic activism, today the forms that dominate include documentary, photojournalism, benefit concerts, and above all life writing. What lies behind the humanitarian impulse and project? How does humanitarian activism impact the peoples it aims to serve? What can we learn about global inequality from the stories associated with it, both in what they mean to say and what they don’t? These are some of the questions that will focus the conversation between politics and literature that we'll engage in investigating one of the most controversial sectors in the international order today.

GT-UF 201.004 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Ascension Mejorado

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Economic Development and Historical Patterns of Industrialization
The course will explore industrialization patterns throughout history and on a global scale. We will pay special attention to the roots of industrialization in changing social relations and the role played by new inventions and international trade in the widening of the market and the division of labor. The social and political institutions that constitute the background of industrialization will be highlighted. The transformation of the labor force from peasantry to industrial labor and the attendant hardships endured by the new industrial workers as a result will be considered. We will examine the structural features of the first industrial revolution in Britain in late XVIII century and its legacy not just for England but for the world as a whole. We will analyze the role of the colonies in the expansion of British industrial might and its offshoots in the patterns of industrialization adopted by the colonies themselves, and their potential for further development, focusing on India and South Africa. The experience of Japan and South Korea will provide a contrasting reference to the classical experience of Britain and Continental Europe. In such cases of late industrialization, the role of the government in promoting the expansion of industry and trade, transformed these countries into industrial powers in a shorter period of times than their European predecessors. The political economy of import-substitution industrialization in Latin America will be examined and its impact assessed relative to the export-led growth followed by the East Asian countries. The industrialization experience of the Soviet Union and other centrally planned economies will be included as well in order to offer students a well-rounded view of the industrialization processes that emerged over the last two hundred years. Among other topics students will explore the historical and social factors that led to the establishment of state-owned industries and the structural obstacles to development. We will end the course with a class debate where students will evaluate the different models of development studied throughout the course and consider their application to currently developing nations.

GT-UF 201.005 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Regina Gramer

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

A World At War

War is all around us, all the time. War shapes us, even when we live in peace. For better or for worse, war affects every aspect of our globalized world today. Modern war has changed military strategies, societies, economies, and cultures around the world. Civilians have become the purposeful targets of war, whether in mass murder, bombings, rapes, or forced removals. Civilians have also contributed to the mobilizations for total wars, at times reaping significant benefits. In this class, we will focus in particular on World War II, the deadliest military conflict in human history. During World War II between 40 and 70 million people were killed worldwide, many more civilians than soldiers. This course will revisit World War II from a global studies perspective, exploring its most significant facets and contemporary relevance in interdisciplinary ways. We will study how and why we tell so many different stories about World War II, even the same event such as the liberation of Buchenwald. We will explore why Americans view World War II as the “Good War” while most others do not. We will look at ‘old’ topics in ‘new’ ways and discuss how our view of war crimes and perpetrators changes when we connect topics such as strategic bombing and colonialism, or colonialism and genocide. We will analyze the ways in which World War II intersected with decolonization both in terms of the soldiers who fought in the war (whether African Americans, Indians, or Frantz Fanon, for instance) and the high politics of military strategy. We will also examine those who benefitted economically from World War II and those who paid the price with slave labor and prostitution. Can justice be done? We will also learn about the legacy of World War II, in particular the ways in which civilians cope with the trauma of total war, but also the ways in which postwar states have adjusted their politics. Was World War II progressive in some aspects? We will look at both sides of this debate in relation to women, decolonization, and the environment. Last, but not least, we will revisit various different philosophical and religious justifications for “just” wars and ask what types of modifications these rationales might need after World War II. In addition, you will have a chance to study how World War II played out in your junior-year site and learn to trace the impact of World War II on your junior-year site until today.



Global Writing Seminar

GWS-UF 101.001 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Matt Longabucco

Course Description TBA

GWS-UF 101.003 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Suzanne Menghraj

Course Description TBA

GWS-UF 101.005 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Sean Eve

Course Description TBA

GWS-UF 101.007 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Jennifer Zoble

Writing in Place
Where have you been, as a resident, a visitor, a daydreamer? How have the places you’ve known helped to shape the way you see, hear, speak, write? In this course, we’ll examine texts from a variety of authors, cultures, and media that explore places both real and imagined. We’ll consider the techniques used by these artists to render the places they’ve known in all their complexity and specificity, and we’ll use their works as formal and inspirational models in crafting our own personal essays. We’ll also learn about ethnographic research, and students will undertake place-based individual projects. Authors will include Zadie Smith, Virginia Woolf, Pico Iyer, Russell Banks, James Baldwin, Luc Sante, Joan Didion, Valeria Luiselli, and Richard Rodriguez, among others.

GWS-UF 101.008 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Jacqueline Bishop

Course Description TBA


Senior Colloquium I

SCOI-UF 401.001 | MW 12:30-1:45 | Elayne Tobin

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401.002 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Emily Bauman

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401.003 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Tamuira Reid

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401.004 | TR 3:30-4:45 |  Johann Jaeckel

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401.005 | MW 2:00-3:15 | Martin Reichert

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401.006 | TR 4:45-6:10 | Luis Ramos

ARTS AND LITERATURES

SCOI-UF 401.007 | MW 9:30-10:45 | Matt Longabucco

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401.008 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Regina Gramer

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

SCOI-UF 401.009 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Patricio Navia

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401.004 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Rochelle Almeida

IDENTITIES AND REPRESENTATIONS

SCOI-UF 401.0011 | TR 3:30pm-4:45pm | Phillip Washburn

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT


Senior Seminars

SCAI-UF 401.001 | MW 12:30-1:45 | Jim McBride

Ethics, Law and Global Finance Capital

Finance capital washes across the face of the globe, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Although many people wrongly assume that finance capital is limited to large institutional investors, such as investment banks, hedge funds, pension funds, or private equity funds, commercial banks sweep the accounts of all of their customers nightly, invest these funds in government securities (an investment vehicle called a “repo”), sold on the secondary market by other investors, who then use the proceeds of these sales to invest capital in a wide range of other investment vehicles, e.g., stocks in developing countries (emerging markets), distressed debt in industrialized nations, real estate in China, etc. Hence, Main Street is inextricably linked to Wall Street, not only through pension funds and 401ks but also through everyday checking and savings accounts. This interdisciplinary seminar introduces students to the circulation of finance capital. Students will study the rise of capitalist institutions, types of global financial products, the regulation of capital markets by government and industry SROs (self-regulatory organizations), and the social ethics of institutions and personnel (social capital) involved in global finance. In particular, the seminar will discuss the cause and consequences of the financial collapse of 2008. The seminar will draw upon the disciplines of economics, philosophy, politics, sociology, and social psychology to explain the rarified world of finance. Special attention will be paid to abuses in the market, such as financial fraud and market manipulation, insider trading, money laundering, bribery, Ponzi schemes, and the like. In addition to Western models of the free market, the seminar will also explore the principles of Islamic finance and the “market socialism” practiced in the Communist People’s Republic of China.

SCAI-UF 401.002 | MW 3:30-4:45 | Roberta Newman

Advertising: Selling to the Global Village

In 1964, Marshall McLuhan posited the idea that the world was fast becoming a “global village,” writing that “we have extended our central nervous system in a global embrace, abolishing both space and time as far as our planet is concerned.” At the time, these statements seemed futuristic. Today, we read them as prophetic. Indeed, in this age of new media, it is difficult to deny the fact that we are all linked, in virtually real time, in what is quite literally a world wide web. It is also difficult to ignore that central to the global village is its marketplace Indeed, one of primary uses of media, both new and old, is to sell things. To a great extent, both the things we are sold and the ways in which they are sold to us reflect the ways in which we live: our cultures, both local and global. And not only does advertising—the art and business of selling—reflect culture, it also creates it. In this seminar, we will examine global advertising both as a reflector and creator of culture. Focusing on content and context, we will explore the ways in which advertising functions within the global village, on a number of different levels. Over the course of the semester, we will utilize concepts and techniques from the fields of media studies, art history, anthropology, sociology, psychology and marketing as well as our own first-hand observation and anecdotal evidence, gathered in New York, abroad sites, and home towns and countries, as tools to help with our in-depth study of advertising. We will begin the semester with an examination of theoretical works, followed by a historic overview of the development of the business and art of advertising. Specifically, we will look at the ways in which global advertising functions as a unifier and as a divider. In order to do so, we will examine the marketing of global brands such as Coca Cola, Subaru, and New York University, to understand how advertising responds to cultural differences at the same time in promotes homogeneity. We will also pay some attention to the way in which ethnic and national identities may be informed, at least in part, by the world of advertising.

SCAI-UF 401.003 | TR 9:30am-10:45am | Robert Squillace

The World Heritage Course

A few nails and an iron pin excavated from a Viking shelter at Lance aux Meadows, a fishing village of 38 souls on the northern tip of Newfoundland, are enough to get it on the list. Four enormous sculptures of former presidents at Mount Rushmore are not.  New York’s Museum Mile is not on the list, though Berlin’s Museum Island is.  Independence Hall?  In.  Washington Monument?  Out.

The list in question is UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage roster, a collection of 780 sites around the world that have received the UN’s imprimatur as being of enduring cultural interest, part of the cultural inheritance of every human on earth.  From its origins in the 1970s, the UN’s efforts to identify, preserve, and publicize a common human cultural heritage have grown to proportions hardly imagined when a modest dozen sites were first approved in 1978.  This course will focus on the UNESCO-designated World Cultural Heritage sites, raising such questions as: how does the UN define “world cultural heritage”?  What, by its guidelines, constitutes “culture,” and how has that definition been put into practice at the actual cultural heritage sites themselves?  To what extent and in what ways does the UNESCO designation affect the way a site is managed and publicized?  How do we regard the idea of “world cultural heritage” - who owns the past, and what responsibility do we have toward it?  What are the politics involved in winning approval for a site?  If sites are indeed part of a “world heritage” rather than a national or local patrimony, who truly owns them - does our responsibility to protect and preserve them override national sovereignty when monuments are endangered by war or poverty?   Students will actively shape the course content, as the second half of the semester will focus on the sites that students choose for their major projects after a few weeks of general background texts.

SCAI-UF 401.004 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Peter Diamond

Nationalism and Democracy in an Age of Globalization

This course will examine the challenges posed by the rise of nationalist conflict since the end of the Cold War, as governments around the world are confronted by demands from ethnic groups for recognition, protection, or autonomy within the boundaries of the state. We begin by examining the meaning of nationalism, which remains a complex and much contested concept. While the resurgence of nationalism is not in dispute, its origin and its meaning are subjects of deep debate among contemporary social scientists and historians. Did the collapse of the bipolar balance of power in the 1990s simply allow ancient cultural hatreds to resurface? Or is nationalism largely a reaction to democratization, economic development, and a revolution in the means of communication? We will attempt to answer these questions in the context of the recent increase in international migration as a result of global economic and political developments. In addition to these empirical questions, we will also examine debates among political theorists over the justifiability of nationalism. Some liberal theorists tend to view nationalism with suspicion, since its emphasis on community and belonging, as well as the desire to seek political support and protection for these feelings, puts it at odds with liberal commitments to individual rights and to freedom and equality as universal values. But others argue that recognition and protection of national minorities is a precondition for a just society, particularly when the viability of such groups may be undermined by economic and political decisions taken by the majority. We will think through these normative debates by examining several recent or on-going controversies occasioned by nationalist conflict. Should ethnic or national groups have publicly funded education in their native language? Should the traditional homelands of indigenous peoples be reserved for their benefit, and so protected from settlement or development by “outsiders”? What are the obligations of liberal democracies with respect to religious or cultural practices of national groups that are deemed “illiberal” by mainstream society?

SCAI-UF 401.005 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Adedamola Osinulu

Africa, New York: Discovering a Continent in the City

This course makes a proposition that Africa is not just a continent across the Atlantic but is a place in New York. Indeed, the sons and daughters of that immense and diverse landmass have carried the ideas that collectively constitute “Africa” across the ocean and re-planted them in the Americas for centuries. Further, the conceptualization of the continent as a place has happened beyond its geography as much as within it. Therefore, in this course, students will be asked to examine the cultural production of Africans and their descendants in New York, the pre-eminent global cosmopolis. By engaging with contemporary communities and extant places, students will be asked to cast a glance back towards the long history of interaction between the people of Africa and the city of New York. Along the way, students will systematically encounter the cultural production of Africans and African-Americans in the areas of Religion, Visual Culture, Performance, Literature, Science, and Commerce. The course will treat the city as a learning resource as valuable as any that can be encountered in the classroom. As such, course participants will frequent the city’s many cultural spaces during the semester.


Social Foundations I

SFI-UF 101.005 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Heidi White

Course Description TBA

SFI-UF 101.009 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Michael Shenefelt

Course Description TBA

SFI-UF 101.013 | MW 9:30-10:45 | Farzad Mahootian

Course Description TBA

SFI-UF 101.017 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Joseph Portanova

Course Description TBA