Emails (excerpted), Ted Burton, director of communications, Central Health, May 26, 2017 and June 1-2, 2017

1:20 p.m.

May 26, 2017

Museitif was referring to CommUnityCare’s patient population – meaning patients in our community that Central Health serves.

The data comes from CommUnityCare’s Next Gen database, which is from self-reported data from patients.

 

I hope this clarifies her comment.  

 

Best,

Ted

 

Here’s the chart:

 

Top 10 Languages spoken by CUC patients, FY15

(excluding unknown or other)

Language

%

1

English

51.9%

2

Spanish

43.5%

3

Arabic

1.1%

4

Burmese

0.4%

5

Nepali

0.4%

6

Vietnamese

0.3%

7

Persian

0.2%

8

American Sign Language

0.2%

9

Swahili

0.1%

10

Amharic

0.1%

Total

98.1%

 CommUnityCare’s Next Gen data base

 

 

 

Ted Burton

Director of Communications

 

5:05 p.m.

May 26, 2017

Here is a clarification regarding Maram Museitif’s quote. Please note we are updating the press release as well (which is on our website).

 

“I’m very familiar with Central Health’s mission and the needs of the people we serve,” said Museitif. “I bring a broader representation to the board. Austin has a growing Muslim, Arab, and refugee community and they need a voice at the table. I can be that voice. I’m a Muslim and speak fluent Arabic, which is the third most common language in the CommUnityCare patient population. The passion and diversity I bring is important for now and for future generations. It is vital we close the gap of health inequities for all our underserved populations. I understand the health disparities our community faces and can make a significant difference in improving their health outcomes.”

 

I have also asked our data analyst about these two questions:

What are the raw numbers behind the percentages?

What question was asked that generated the results? How did this breakdown compare to 2014 and earlier years?

5:25 p.m.

June 1, 2017

 

 

 

 

Best,

Ted

 

 

 

 

 

Ted Burton

Director of Communications

10:46 a.m.

June 2, 2017

Board Member Museitif and I can call you after 2 p.m. today. She informs me that’s when her meetings conclude. What’s the best number to reach you?

 

As for your second inquiry – we don’t have data analysis on why Arabic has proved to be the third most common language. One of the main reasons we collect language data (other than for reporting purposes required of FQHCs) is so that we can be responsive to the needs of our patients. CommUnityCare cares for everyone who walks through the clinic doors regardless of what language they speak, where they’re from and whether or not they have insurance.

 

Matt Balthazar, CommUnityCare’s Director of Strategic Planning and Development (copied on this email) is asking an Arabic-speaking provider if they’re willing to speak with you and talk about their experience serving this community. Let me know if this would be helpful to you.

 

Best,

Ted

 

 

Ted Burton

11:54 a.m.

June 2, 2017

In my previous email, I mentioned Matt Balthazar was trying to secure an Arabic-speaking provider willing to speak with you and he’s done that.

Her name is Amneh Amro and she’s a physician assistant. In the past, she has had one of the larger Arabic speaking panels within CommUnityCare and can help provide a provider’s perspective as to why – in her opinion - Arabic is third most identified language of patients seeking care at CommUnityCare health centers.

5:02 p.m.

CommUnityCare does not have statistics about countries of origin.

 

Thanks,

Ted

 

 

 

Ted Burton

Director of Communications