Section A - League and Team Administration

Regular Season

Playoffs

Overtime

Playing Requirements

Violating the Season Playing Requirements

Trades

Cages

Calendar Dates

Team Naming Conventions

Dissolving Teams

Expansion or Replacement General Managers

No Strat-O-Matic Hockey Cards

Rules, Change Management

Section B - The Draft and Related Activities

Summary of the Draft Procedure

Establishing the Available Player Pool

Establishing the Draft Pool

Conducting the Draft

Standing Incentives

Releasing Extra Players / Roster Sizes

The Waiver Draft

Expansion/Protection Draft Procedures

Section C - Player Designations

Enforcer

The Belt Holder

Shadow

Super Passers

Turtles

Section D - Game Duties and Components

Games Duties

Play Selectors

The Action & Split Decks

Possibilities in the Action Deck

Shifts

The Fatigued/Out of Position Handicap

The ‘Ready Rule’

The Penalty Timer

Determining Assists

Time of a Goal

Roll of the Dice (Rich Rule!)

Section E - Game Play

Face-Offs

Shooting

Determining the Primary Opponent

Deflections

Penetrations

Passing

Dump & Chase

Intimidations

Pass Interceptions

Loose Puck

Intentional Icing

Goalie Fatigue

Pulling the Goaltender

Injuries

Returning from Injury

Game Misconducts, Suspensions and the Discipline Committee

Section F - Types of Penalties

Minor Penalties

Major Penalties

Four Minute (Double-Minor) Penalties

Two Man Advantage Penalties

Penalty Shots

Out of Position Penalty

Delayed Penalties

Gamesheet Violations

Game Play Penalties

Secondary Penalty Charts

Goaltender Penalties

Fights

Challenging an Opponent to a Fight

Section G - Penalty Situations

Penalty Alignments

Actions by the Short-handed Team

Ending the Period with a Penalty

Ending Power Play Opportunities

Positioning Players On and After Penalty Situations

Section H - Definitions

All-Crappy Team

Consecutive Shot Rule

Convenient Opportunity

EPP (End of Powerplay) Shot

Goon Bonus

Hot Threshold Value

Natural Opponent

Penalty Parameter Line

Rookie

SEPP (Standard End of Powerplay) Options

Z-Chart Player Identifier Process

Section A - League and Team Administration

  1. Regular Season

  1. Based on a 7-team league, the regular-season schedule will see each team play 56 games:  28 as home and 28 as visitors, playing each opponent nine (9) occurrences (totaling 54 games), plus an additional 2 games based on the previous season’s standings, as follows:  2 vs 1; 1 vs 3; 4 vs 2; 3 vs 5; 6 vs 4; 7 vs 6; 5 vs 7
  2. Final season rankings are determined by total points.  Each team earns two points for every win and one point for every tie.
  3. If two or more teams are tied in points at the end of the season, use the following process to determine the final rankings:
  4. If at least one of the tied teams will not make the playoffs and at least one of the tied teams will make the playoffs, then rank the teams:
  1. First with a round robin tournament involving all the tied teams.  Home teams are to be decided by a coin toss, then by
  2. Goal plus-minus in the tournament, then by
  3. Head to Head records in Regular season amongst the tied teams, then by
  4. Total Wins in Regular season, then by
  5. Winning % against all established Playoff teams, then by
  6. Coin toss.
  1. If the tied teams are all in the playoffs or all the tied teams are out of the playoffs, then rank the teams:
  1. First by Won/Loss/Tie record in all games involving only the tied teams, then by
  2. Total wins in the current regular season, then by
  3. Winning % against all playoff teams, then by
  4. Coin toss.
  1. Playoffs

  1. Once the regular season games have been played and the standings are determined, the top four placed teams earn playoff positions. The playoff format is based upon the ‘Page’ playoff system.
  2. In Quarter-final #1, the 1st and 2nd place teams play each other.  The 1st place team has home-ice advantage.  The winner advances to the Benkocup Finals;
  3. In Quarter-final #2, the 3rd and 4th place teams play each other.  The 3rd place team has home-ice advantage.  The winner advances to the Semi-final;
  4. In the Semi-final, the loser of Quarter-final #1 has home-ice advantage over the winner of Quarter-final #2.  The winner advances to the Benkocup Final.
  5. The Benkocup final is played between the winner of Quarter-final #1 and the winner of the Semi-final.  The winner of Quarter-final #1 has home-ice advantage.
  6. ‘Byes’ during the playoff schedule allow healing time for injuries and rest time for goalies (as per consecutive starts)
  7. The most games played in any playoff round count as the number of games played for all remaining teams in regards to injuries.
  1. Overtime

  1. If a game is tied at the end of regulation time, then the game shall continue into overtime.
  2. Once a goal is scored in overtime, the game is immediately over.
  3. One 5-minute overtime period is played for regular season games.  The game is considered tied if neither team scores.
  4. For regular season games, overtime is played using eight Action Cards with line changes after the 2nd, 4th, and 6th Action Cards.
  5. For playoff games, each 20-minute overtime period is played using 30 Action cards with line changes after the 8th, 15th, and 22nd Action Cards.
  6. For playoff games, overtime continues indefinitely until one of the teams score.
  7. During each overtime period, only three forwards may play a maximum of two shifts.  All remaining forwards may only play one shift.
  8. During each overtime period, each defenseman may play a maximum of two shifts.
  9. During overtime, all references to Opponent Defense 8, 9, 10, 11 become:
  1. Opponent Defense 7, 8, 9, 10 respectively in the first overtime period;
  2. Opponent Defense 7, 7, 8, 9 respectively in the second overtime period;
  3. Opponent Defense 7, 7, 7, 8 respectively in the third overtime period;
  4. Opponent Defense 7, 7, 7, 7 respectively in all subsequent overtime periods.
  1. During overtime, all players’ Penalty ratings, except Enforcers, are reduced by 1 for each overtime period, to a minimum of ‘D’.  D10 defensemen are further reduced to D11 as appropriate.
  1. Playing Requirements

  1. Unless Caged or without the benefit of the 10-Game Min Incentive, all skaters must dress for a minimum of twelve (12) regular season games.
  2. There is no minimum playing requirements for the playoffs.
  3. During the regular season, every goaltender must make every effort to play a minimum of 180 minutes, and not exceed:
  4. The number of NHL games from the prior season, as determined from the current Strat-O-Matic card, and
  5. The minutes listed in the following chart, based the goaltender’s Consecutive Appearances Rating.

Consecutive Appearances Rating

Maximum Minutes

1

1180

2

1360

3

1540

4

1720

5

1900

6

2080

7

2260

8

2440

9

2620

10

2800

11

2980

12

3160

  1. During the entire playoffs, a goaltender may not play more than half of the NHL games reflected on his SHL card.  Any half games are rounded up. (i.e, 11 NHL games = 6 SHL playoff games)
  2. During any playoff series, a goaltender must not play more consecutive games than his Consecutive Appearances Rating unless the goaltender is considered ‘Hot’.  Furthermore, a goaltender that is considered ‘hot’ may not play more consecutive games than that of twice his Consecutive Appearances Rating.
  3. A goaltender is considered ‘Hot’ if, for every game during his last stretch of consecutive games, all of the following are true:
  1. The goaltender has started every game, and
  2. The goaltender has played at least 55 minutes in each game, and
  3. The goaltender has never been substituted for by another goaltender, and
  4. The goaltender’s G.A.A. is less than the Hot Threshold value.
  1. During a game in which a goaltender is playing ‘hot’, the goaltender becomes fatigued immediately after surrendering a goal that is greater than the Hot Threshold value.  The goaltender may complete the game fatigued, but must rest for at least one full game before being considered rested.
  2. A ‘hot’ goaltender that is lost to injury may return to the same game if possible, but is then considered fatigued and must rest for at least one full game before being considered rested.
  1.  Violating the Season Playing Requirements

  1. When a team violates the Playing Requirements results of their roster, they will lose 2 points in the season standings for each game it would take to undo the infraction.
  2. For example, if a team does not have the 10-Game Min incentive and a player from their roster only dresses for nine games (3 short of the 12 minimum), then that team will lose 6 points from their final season’s point totals.
  3. Any points lost in the standings due to Season Playing Requirements will not benefit the violating team in the following season’s drafting order. In other words, if a team drops in the standings, the drafting order is based upon the standings BEFORE the decrease in team points.
  1. Trades

  1. Trades are solely the responsibility of the teams involved.
  2. Draft selections may be traded.  However, only selections from the next two immediate annual drafts may be traded, effective the date of the trade transaction.  Draft selections traded during the draft festivities, up to and including the waiver draft, may only include the current and subsequent draft.
  3. Cages, Waiver picks and Incentives can be traded.
  4. Trades must be finalized.  Trades may not include future considerations for forthcoming results or data, etc.
  1. Exception:  A trade that consists of Draft selections may consist of alternative Draft selections.  The alternatives must be clearly defined; the team responsible for making the choice must be made clear; and a defining timeframe must be imposed.  None of these alternative Draft choices can be based on forthcoming conditions.
  2. Note:  The team that is receiving these draft selections holds a lien on ALL the said draft picks until one of the options has been chosen.  Subsequently, none of these draft selections can be further traded until the lien has been removed.
  1. Upon completion of a trade, a League announcement should be made to the remaining teams, and the transaction must be logged with the league.
  2. No trades are permitted after the Trade Deadline, which is established as the point in the regular season when all teams have played 44 games, or the point when all coaches agree that no further trading will occur – whichever is first.
  3. Trading may resume after the completion of the Benko Cup finals.
  1. Cages

  1. Unless traded away, each team is granted one Cage at the beginning of the season.
  2. Before the regular season begins, each team may fill their cage with either:
  3. Any player on their roster, or
  4. Any two uncarded players who were on their roster the previous season.
  5. Caged players do not need to play the minimum regular season playing requirements.
  6. Once the Cage is assigned to a player, it is non-transferable.
  7. Caged players are eligible to be traded.  However, the cage is still non-transferable.
  1. Calendar Dates

  1. In all situations, it is preferred that all General Managers try to schedule the following events on days that are in the best interest of all involved.  If these days are undeterminable, then the following events will occur on these default calendar dates:
  1. Annual Banquet & General Managers Meeting – The first Sunday in June
  2. The Draft Pool Selections – The second Wednesday after the Strat-O-Matic Hockey card previews are released.
  3. The Entry Draft – The last Wednesday in September.
  1. Team Naming Conventions

  1. The league board of General Managers must approve of all implementations or changes of team names, including both the city location and its moniker.
  1. Dissolving Teams

  1. If a General Manager is unavailable to manage and coach a team and no replacement can be found, then the team and its roster is held in suspension for one year. During this period, no trades involving this team may occur.
  2. The team can partake in only one Draft.  A committee, consisting of the remaining General Managers, will select the players drafted.
  3. If a replacement General Manager & Coach is found before the following Draft day, the team partakes in this Draft.  The team is granted the LAST draft selection in each round.
  4. If no replacement General Manager & Coach can be found before the following Draft, the team is dissolved.  The team does not partake during this draft.  Any existing draft selections become null and void.
  5. The existing roster of the dissolved team is placed into the Available Player Pool.
  1. Expansion or Replacement General Managers

  1. Any new expansion or replacement General Manger can only be inducted into the league after a unanimous, favourable vote by the existing General Managers.  This new General Manager will be on a one-year probation.  After the one-year probationary period, another unanimous, favourable vote of the existing General Managers will be required to permit the new General Manager to continue as members of the league.
  1. No Strat-O-Matic Hockey Cards

  1. During the rare occurrences when there are no new Strat-O-Matic Hockey cards for an entire season due to NHL lockouts, etc  - and there is a potential for new cards to be printed for future seasons – then our league will continue using the latest Strat-O-Matic Hockey cards available.  The Draft, Available Player pool, etc… will continue as usual, based on these cards.
  1. Rules, Change Management

  1. League voting can only proceed if there at least quorum in attendance (half the league General Managers + 1)
  2. To pass a new rule or change an existing one, a supporting vote of at least two-thirds of the voting General Managers are needed to successfully pass the proposed change.
  3. To clarify an existing rule, a majority vote decides the outcome of the clarification.
  4. Any new rule, change, or clarification must be recorded so that the Rules and Regulations document can be adjusted at a later date.
  5. Any new rule that affects the next Draft may delay the induction of the rule.  However, this delay will only last a maximum of one year.
  6. If, during game play, a topic is found that is not covered by this document, then resolve the topic:
  1. First by a vote of the General Managers, or
  2. If insufficient General Managers are available, then by rationalizing the most logical application that is consistent with our existing regulations.  The topic can be officially resolved at a later time once all General Managers can cast their vote.

Section B - The Draft and Related Activities

  1. Summary of the Draft Procedure

  1. The following is a summary of the events that make up the SHL Draft in their chronological order.  Further explanations of these events follow the summary.
  1. Establish the Available Player Pool
  2. Establish the Draft Pool
  3. Conduct the Draft
  4. Select Team Incentives
  5. Release Players into Waiver Pool
  6. Conduct the Waiver Draft
  1. Establishing the Available Player Pool

  1. The Available Player Pool consists of all the current Strat-O-Matic player cards that have not been on an SHL roster for the prior two seasons.
  1. Establishing the Draft Pool

  1. The Draft Pool consists of 56 players.  They are chosen from the Available Player Pool as follows:
  1. A Rookie Selection is chosen randomly from the NHL All-Rookie Team, by:
  1. Removing the cards for the NHL All Rookie Team from the Available Player Pool.  Some of these players may already reside on an SHL roster.  If this is the case, no substitutions are made.
  2. The team with the first overall selection blindly picks one card from the shuffled deck of NHL rookies.
  3. This player will be put into the Draft Pool.
  4. The remaining rookie cards are placed back into their respective positions in the Available Player Pool.  This is to be done by a neutral party or by the SHL team with the lowest first pick in the draft.
  1. The remaining 55 players are chosen by randomly selecting a fixed number of players from each position, as follows:
  1. 5 goaltenders;
  2. 12 from every forward position (LW, C, RW)
  3. 7 from both defenseman position (LD, RD)
  1. Conducting the Draft

  1. The Draft is limited to four rounds of selections.
  2. Round 1 is established as follows:

1st

Previous season’s 7th place team

2nd

Previous season’s 6th place team

3rd

Previous season’s 5th place team

4th

First team eliminated from the prior season’s playoffs

5th

Second team eliminated from the prior season’s playoffs

6th

Benko Cup Finalist of the previous playoffs

7th

Benko Cup Champion of the previous playoffs

  1. Establish Rounds 2, 3, and 4 as follows:
  1. All three rounds are made up of seven selections – one for each team.  Each round is ordered as follows:

Selection # in each round

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Last Year’s Final Standings

7th

6th

5th

4th

3rd

2nd

1st

  1. If any team’s draft selections are traded to another team, those selections are then chosen by the new team.
  2. Each selection in the Draft is limited to three (3) minutes.
  3. Each team is granted one, 5-minute, time-out.
  4. Not selecting a player in the allotted time results in a forced use of the time-out.  If the time-out has already been used, then the team forfeits their right to select a player for this selection.
  5. Once a team drafts a player, the name is announced and registered in the Draft Log.
  1. Standing Incentives

  1. There are two rounds of Incentives selections:
  1. In the first round, the team with the largest difference between their winning percentages of the last 12 games of the season compared to their first 44 games of the previous season gets first pick of the incentives.  The team with the second best difference gets second pick.  This continues through all teams in the league.
  2. In the second round, incentives are selected by the previous year’s non-playoff teams, awarded in the reverse order of the final standings.
  1. These 2nd round incentives cannot be traded until after the Benkocup series of the previous season.
  1. All Incentives are in effect for the current season ONLY.
  2. The following is a table of all the Incentives and their descriptions:

Incentive        

Description

Trainer

The team with this incentive may, for every Day-to-Day injury during the regular season and playoffs, attempt two rolls per column on the Day-to-Day Chart.  

Extra Cage

The team receives an extra Cage for the current season.

Goalie Endurance

The team with this incentive will, for each of its goaltenders with a Consecutive Appearances Rating of 2 or more,

  • Increase their Consecutive Appearances Rating by 1, and
  • Increase their NHL game totals by three (3) games.

10-Game Min

The minimum playing requirement for all skaters is reduced to 10 games for the current season.

Pugilist

For every fight during the season and playoffs, one designated player gets a bonus roll added to his total after every roll of “6”

Lawyer

All suspensions are eliminated for the current season and playoffs.

FO+

One designated player receives a +1 bonus for every face-off during the season and playoffs.

PP Specialist        

Each game for the season and playoffs, a player (which may be different each game) may be designated as a “Powerplay Specialist”.  A “PP” is marked by this player’s name on the score sheet.

If the player is a defenseman, he may play, at most, three even-strength shifts, but may play every powerplay situation at a defenseman’s position.

If the player is a forward, he must ‘stars’ (**).  He may play, at most, two even-strength shifts but may play every powerplay situation.  If the player has only one star (*), he must alternate between a forward and defensive position each successive powerplay opportunity played.

This player may play, at most, one even-strength shift during each overtime period.

PK Specialist

Each game for the season and playoffs, a player (which may be different each game) may be designated as a “Penalty Killing Specialist”.  A “PK” is marked by this player’s name on the score sheet.

If the player is a defenseman, he may play, at most, three even-strength shifts, but may play every short-handed situation at a defenseman’s position.

If the player is a forward, he may play, at most, two even-strength shifts, but may play every short-handed situation.

This player may play, at most, one even-strength shift during each overtime period.

Extended Roster

The team’s roster may include 29 players to start the season.

4-Goalies

The team’s roster may include four goaltenders to start the season.

This incentive does not permit the team to exceed the 27-player limit without the addition of the Extended Roster incentive.

Nobody Beats the Vis

Any “VIS” penalties from the Secondary Penalty Chart are ignored for the season and playoffs.  It also negates the X-Factor.

Nagging Injuries

Each player on their roster with nagging injuries from the previous season will have their Body Part Injury Accumulation Total reduced by 1.  This incentive takes effect once the season begins.

7-Forwards

The team with this incentive may have a maximum of seven forwards play four even-strength regulation shifts during the regular season and playoffs.

PP-16

For every game during the season and playoffs, one designated player, while intimidating in shorthanded situations, successfully takes away the puck when the result of the Split Deck Card is ‘PP-16’, in addition to their existing intimidation rating.

  1. Releasing Extra Players / Roster Sizes

  1. After the Incentive selections, players may be released from the team’s rosters.  This is done starting with the first place team from the previous season, and working through the standings.
  2. Any players that do not have cards and wish to remain on a team’s roster MUST be caged.  It follows that a team may not have more uncarded players on their roster than they do cages.  Any uncaged, uncarded players must be released into the Waiver Pool.
  3. After a team announces their released players, the team roster MUST have a maximum of 27 players.  These totals include all carded and uncarded players - including goaltenders.  The only exception to this rule is a roster that is increased due to the Extended Roster Incentive.
  4. After announcing their released players, a team may not have more than three goaltenders on their roster.  The only exception to this rule is a roster that is amended to by the 4-Goalie Incentive.
  1. The Waiver Draft

  1. The Waiver Pool consists of:
  1. Players released at the current draft
  2. Players in the current Draft Pool who were undrafted.
  3. Players who were on an SHL roster in any of the previous two seasons and are no longer property of an SHL team.
  1. Players in the Waiver Pool may be signed as free agents.
  2. Unless trades have been made, the Waiver Draft starts with the last place team, and works backwards through the standings.
  3. During each turn selection, a team may sign one free agent and/or release player(s) from their roster.
  4. Free agent signings may not permit a team to violate its roster limits.
  5. Players released into the Waiver Pool during the Waiver Draft may not be re-signed by another team until the beginning of a new round (i.e., beginning with the 8th, 15st, 22th …etc picks).
  6. If a team does not wish to sign a free agent or release players, they announce their intention to “Pass”.  The next team is then allowed to proceed.
  7. The Waiver Draft continues indefinitely until each team passes within the same round. 
  1. Expansion/Protection Draft Procedures

  1. In the event that the league expands by one additional team, the following process will be used to create the roster of the new team:
  1. The regular Draft Pool is selected;
  2. Each existing team protects 12 players from their current roster;
  3. For each player taken from a roster, that team may protect two additional players.
  4. No existing team may lose more than two players from their roster through the expansion draft;
  5. Through this method, the expansion team must select between 16 and 18 players.
  6. The expansion team must announce the number of picks of each position type (# of goalies, # of defenseman, # of forwards) to complete their roster.  The defensemen picks must be as evenly distributed as much as possible between the two positions.  Similarly, the forward picks must be as evenly distributed as much as possible between the three positions.
  7. The expansion team then must select nine (9) players using the '2-choose-1' method.  After this process, the expansion team must meet the following roster requirements (2 or 3 goalies, and at least 7 defenseman)
  8. The expansion team will be awarded the last selection during each round of the waiver draft.
  9. The expansion team will be given the last selection for the Standing Incentives draft.

Section C - Player Designations

  1. Enforcer

  1. At the start of each game, each coach may declare one or more players to be an Enforcer.
  2. To qualify as an Enforcer, this player:
  1. Must only play a forward position for the duration of the game, and
  2. Must have an “A” or “AA” Penalty rating, and
  3. Must not be a Turtle, and
  1. As an Enforcer, this player:
  1. Is to be indicated on the game sheet with an “E”.  If a team dresses multiple enforcers, they are to be indicated as Eo, E1, E2, etc, …where Eo is designated to have the highest priority.
  2. Has their Intimidation rating increased by a maximum of two (2).  Enforcers with an “A” Penalty rating are increased to a maximum of 12 or their current rating, whichever is higher; “AA” players to a maximum of 14.
  3. Is considered to have an “AA” penalty rating for all penalty chart references.
  4. Is considered the opponent for all references to the Penalty charts against the opposing team.  However, if a cheap shot occurs, the original puck handler is considered the recipient of the cheap shot.
  5. Is only effective during full strength, even strength situations.
  6. Cannot be designated as a ‘Shadow’
  1. The following is to be considered during game play:
  1. No Enforcer is on the ice
  1. No changes to regular game play
  1. One Enforcer is on the ice:
  1. This Enforcer MUST perform all intimidation opportunities for his team, and
  2. This Enforcer is considered for any conditional penalties.
  1. Each team has an equal number of Enforcers on the ice
  1. No change in game play except:
  1. For an initial penalty on a non-enforcer, consider the highest priority enforcer penalty rating for all conditional penalties that include five minute majors (i.e. +5 or +7 minutes)
  2. For an initial penalty on an enforcer, consider the opposing team’s highest priority enforcer for all conditional penalties.
  1. One team has more Enforcers on the ice than the other team:
  1. For the team with more Enforcers, the highest priority enforcer is considered the only Enforcer on the ice.  It follows that he:
  1. Must perform all intimidation opportunities, and
  2. Is considered for any conditional penalties.
  1.  The Belt Holder

  1. The player that is considered to be the “Fight Champion” is referred to as the Belt Holder.
  2. There can be only one Belt Holder.  Only players who can be Enforcers can the Belt Holder.
  3. Effects of the Belt Holder:
  1. While the Belt Holder is on the ice, the opposing team’s intimidation ratings are reduced by two.
  2. The Belt Holder is considered an Enforcer with the highest priority (E0).
  3. The Belt Holder is considered to have an AA Penalty Rating with their Intimidation rating increased by 3, to a maximum of 14.
  4. The Belt Holder’s Defense value on 7, 8, 9, 10 & 11 are considered to be “Penalty”.
  1. Effects of the Belt Holder are only valid during full and even strength situations (i.e., 5-on-5)
  2. The first Belt Holder of the season is awarded to the player with the first +2 fight record.
  3. The Belt Holder is stripped of the Belt when:
  1. That player is defeated in a fight.  The victor of the fight is now considered the Belt Holder if this fighter has a +2 fight record and can be an Enforcer.
  2. The player is a healthy scratch (not due to a suspension or injury).  In this situation, the player cannot be re-awarded the Belt until someone else has been the Belt Holder.
  3. Declining a challenge.  In this situation, the player cannot be re-awarded the Belt until someone else has been the Belt Holder.
  1. If a new Belt Holder has not been determined as a result of a fight, then the Belt is awarded to the top-ranked fighter at the beginning of their next game, based on the following priority:
  1. Best win/loss fight differential, (at least ‘+2’)
  2. Most fight wins,
  3. Highest fight score differential,
  4. Coin flip.
  1. If a player who loses the Belt is the next eligible player as per the fight ranking, then that player does not regain the Belt until the end of the game in which it was lost.
  2. If the Belt Holder’s team does not make or is eliminated in the playoffs, then the Belt remains with that player and no other player can earn it until the following season.
  1. Shadow

  1. At the start of each game, each coach may declare specific players to be a “Shadow” of a specific player on the opposing team (to be referred to as the “Target”).
  2. To qualify as a Shadow, a player:
  1. Must have a defense rating of 4 or 5, and
  2. Must have an offense rating lower than his defense rating, and
  3. Can only be effective while playing in the forward position, and
  4. Cannot be an Enforcer.
  1. An “S” must be marked on the gamesheet beside the Shadow’s name, and a “T” must be indicated beside the Target’s name.  If a team is dressing multiple Shadows, then they are to be marked as S1/T1, S2/T2, etc.
  2. Multiple Shadows pursuing the same Target is permitted, but not simultaneously.  If multiple Shadows are on the ice concurrently, then the coach must declare which Shadow is in effect at the beginning of their shift or during a stoppage.
  3. Any effects of the Shadow can only be effective during 5-on-5 situations when both the Shadow and Target are simultaneously on the ice.
  4. The Shadow effect can act concurrently with the Enforcer.
  5. Immediately after a line change or a stoppage in play, if both the Shadow and Target are on the ice, the Shadow’s coach may announce that the Shadow is “In Effect” AFTER both teams are deemed ‘Ready’.  If a team has multiple Shadows on the ice during any shift, then only one of them can be ‘In Effect’ at a time.
  6. If the Shadow is “In Effect”, then:
  1. The Shadow’s team MUST have their play selectors set to Offense 1, and
  2. The Shadow may not attempt to intimidate any players other than the Target, and
  3. If the Shadow and Target are natural opponents, then:
  1. Increase the Shadow’s defense rating by one,
  2. If the Shadow is intimidating the Target, then increase the Shadow’s intimidation rating by two,
  3. If one of the Shadow’s linemates is intimidating the Target, then add the Shadow’s intimidation rating to this player’s intimidation rating, and
  1. Provide the puck to the higher intimidator during successful intimidations.  If the ratings are the same, then the puck is recovered by the Shadow, and
  2. Any intimidation penalties are considered to be against the player with the higher penalty rating.  If the ratings are the same, then the possible penalty is considered to be against the Shadow.
  1. If the Shadow and Target are NOT natural opponents, then:
  1. Do not increase the Shadow’s defensive rating,
  2. If the Shadow is intimidating the Target, then increase the Shadow’s intimidation rating by two,
  3. If one of the Shadow’s linemates is intimidating the Target, then add the Shadow’s intimidation rating to this player’s intimidation rating, and
  1. Provide the puck to the higher intimidator during successful intimidations.  If the ratings are the same, then the puck is recovered by the Shadow, and
  2. Any intimidation penalties are considered to be against the player with the higher penalty rating.  If the ratings are the same, then the possible penalty is considered to be against the Shadow.
  1. During attempted penetrations by the Target, consider the greater defensive rating between the Shadow and Target’s natural opponent.  If they are the same, then consider the Shadow as the defensive opponent,
  2. During defensive rating references to the Target’s natural opponent, consider the higher defensive rating between the Shadow and the natural opponent.  If they are the same, then consider the Shadow’s defensive rating,
  3. Any defensive rebounds to the Shadow’s position are changed to offensive rebounds for the Shadow’s natural opponent,
  4. Any unsuccessful passes from the Target’s team that result in possession of the Shadow are considered to be Loose Pucks.
  1. If a Shadow is not “In Effect”, then game play resumes as normal.
  1. Super Passers

  1. The ten players, in the current Strat-O-Matic card set, with the highest assist rating are designated as Super Passers.  If there are multiple players tied for 10th then include all the tied players up to a maximum of 15 players.
  1. If all the tied players result in a pool of more than 15 Super Passers, then sort the tied players using their pro-rated assists from the NHL statistics to determine which 15 players become Super Passers.
  1. Super Passers are in effect during Even Strength and Power Play situations.
  2. Any attempted pass from a Super Passer that results in Passing J or Passing K, refer instead to the Passing L Chart.  However, the pass recipient remains the same.
  3. When, using a Split Deck card, a Super Passer makes an even-strength pass which results in “Against (E): Lose puck to Opponent”, then substitute this result with the pass from the “Against (SH)” section.
  4. In all other Even-Strength and Power Play situations that result in an incomplete pass, consider the result as “OUTSIDE SHOT ONLY FOR ANY PLAYER WITH OFFENSE 2 OR MORE”.
  1. Turtles

  1. Any player that declines a Fight Challenge is considered a ‘Turtle’
  2. Turtles may not challenge other players to fight until the Turtle participates in another fight, either through accepting subsequent challenges or by fighting in a natural fight.

Section D - Game Duties and Components

  1. Games Duties

  1. Each team must select two goaltenders and a maximum of 18 skaters from their roster to dress each game.  This line-up must be completed in such a manner that ensures that each coach can successfully plan to rotate through all 12-regulation shifts without a Fatigued/Out-of-Position infraction.  These selected players must be entered on the gamesheet.  
  1. If a coach submits a line-up that doesn’t meet this criterion, then each player that is played Fatigued/Out-of-Position is immediately suspended for that team’s following game.
  1. If a team cannot dress a complete line-up of 18 skaters and two goaltenders due to injuries, suspensions, etc… they can loan a player from the All-Crappy Team until such time as they can once again dress a complete line-up.
  2. The home team must provide a gamesheet and scorekeeper.  The scorekeeper must complete all sections of the gamesheet upon completion of the game.  This includes total goals, shots, powerplay totals, 3 stars selections, etc.
  3. The visiting team must provide a timekeeper, who is responsible for shuffling cards and calculating times.
  1. Play Selectors

  1. Each Coach must decide on the style of play that his team will use.  The style is indicated by Play Selectors found on the game board.
  2. For any offense that a coach selects, there are also two defenses that he may use.  These two possibilities are clearly indicated on the game board.
  3. The Coach may change his offense and/or defense selectors during any line change or during any stoppage of play.
  4. The visiting team must make their selections first, followed by the home team.
  5. Below are brief explanations of each selection:

Offense 1

A conservative offense with little offensive punch, but difficult to penetrate against.  This selection could be used late in the game to protect a lead.

Offense 2

Standard offensive setup.  This selection allows more scoring opportunities, but is not as protective defensively as Offense 1.

Offense 3

Maximum pressure offense.  This selection could be used late in the game when trying to come from behind, or early to build a lead.  However, this selection will allow more scoring opportunities for the opposing team.

Defense #

Denotes the number of forecheckers a coach uses to exert pressure.  No forecheckers on the ice will make it easier for the opposition to bring the puck out of their own end.  As the number of forecheckers increases, it will become increasingly harder for the offensive team to bring the puck up ice.  However, if the successfully bring the puck up ice, they will have greater scoring chances.

  1. The Action & Split Decks

  1. The Action Deck consists of 30 cards, randomly chosen and shuffled from two complete sets of Action Cards.
  2. The Split Deck consists of 80 cards, randomly shuffled from two complete sets of Split Decks.
  3. The use of these cards determines game play, regulates timing of the game and of shifts.
  4. Unless during a penalty, the period is over when a team requires an Action Card and there are none remaining in the deck.  Before this occurrence, if play can continue without an Action card and once the action from the last Action card is complete, move the Penalty timer for each action of the Offensive team (similar to a powerplay).  Once the timer moves six times, the period is considered over.
  5. Each Action Card is divided into four even-strength offensive sections.  Each section may be subdivided into segments depending on the defensive alignment of the opposition.
  6. There are also powerplay and short-handed sections.
  7. Each time the puck changes teams, and a shot is not indicated, a draw from this deck will determine the team’s next action.
  8. Once used, the Action Cards are discarded for the remainder of that period.
  1. Possibilities in the Action Deck

Reading

Action to be Taken

Opponent Defense #

The player with the puck is challenging his opponent’s defensive ability.  Referring to the number on the Action Deck, read the result from the defense column of the defensive player

If there is no opposing player, consider the result as an outside shot for the puck handler.

Special considerations may have to be made for a defensive Shadow.

Passing

Refer to the controlling player’s card under his passing column to the appropriate letter indicated on the Action Card.

Shot for Designated Player

The offensive player in control has completed a pass to the player designated on the action card.  If this position is empty or to himself, refer to the secondary designation on Action Card.

See the Passing Section for possible substitutions.

Shot for ANY player

The offensive player in control has completed a pass to one of his teammates.  To determine the player, the offensive coach must select one of the players with the highest offensive rating.  A player with a lower offense may take the shot if the instructions indicate so.

However, the coach must also abide by the Consecutive Shot Rule.

Lose puck, Shot for Defensive Team

The offensive player has turned over the puck in his own end.  Refer to the Action Card to determine which player has been awarded the shot.

If no player exists in the designated position, the result is a lose puck.

Lose to Opponent

The offensive player has turned over the puck to his natural opponent.

If no natural opponent exists, the result is a lose puck.

Possible Breakaway

The player in control of the puck started a breakaway attempt.  Pick a Split Deck Card and refer to the Breakaway Section for further instructions.

See the Passing Section for any possible substitutions.

Lose Puck, Possible Breakaway

The player in control has turned over the puck and created a possible breakaway for the opposition.  Pick a Split Deck Card and refer to the Breakaway Section for further instructions.

See the Passing Section for any possible substitutions.

  1. Shifts

  1. Line Change cards indicate a shift transition.  They are to be placed after the 8th, 15th, and 22nd cards in the Action Deck.
  2. Defensemen may play a maximum of five even strength shifts.
  3. A maximum of six forwards can play a maximum of four even-strength shifts.  All remaining forward may play a maximum of three even-strength shifts.  The team with the 7-Forwards incentive may play a maximum of seven forwards a maximum of four shifts.
  4. Any part of an even-strength shift is considered a full shift.
  5. Powerplay and short-handed shifts do not count towards even-strength shift limitations.
  6. If a player can play both forward and defense, he may play five even-strength shifts ONLY if used exclusively as a defenseman.  Otherwise he must adhere to shift rules for a forward position.  This holds true for specialists.
  7. Some forwards may play in the defensive position when their team is on the powerplay.  Refer to the player’s card to determine how often this is permitted.  Possibilities are:
  1. * - At most one power play per game
  2. ** - Any eligible powerplay opportunity.
  1. No skater may play two consecutive even-strength shifts in one period.  Any exceptions due to penalties and/or injuries would apply the Fatigued/Out of Position Handicap.
  2. No skater may play two consecutive powerplays or two consecutive short-handed shifts without:
  1. The PP Specialist Incentive, or the PK Specialist Incentive, or
  2. Applying the Fatigue/Out of Position Handicap due to penalties and/or injuries.
  1. During pulled goalie situations, each player may play a maximum of four Action Cards per game as the “Extra Attacker”.
  2. For every shift change or player substitution, the Ready Rule must be implemented.
  3. Shift changes occur during the following events:
  1. During an even-strength situation and there is no stoppage in play, both teams must make shift changes when the Action Card following the Line Change Card is needed.
  2. During a Powerplay situation and a Line Change Card is exposed, the specialty teams do not need to make changes.  However, an even-strength shift change must occur at the end of the powerplay.
  3. If during a stoppage in play during an even-strength situation:
  1. A Line Change card is exposed on the Action Deck and the face-off is at center ice, then whole shift changes must be made.
  2. A Line Change card is exposed of the Action Deck and the face-off is in one of the end zones, then the coaches may make player substitutions in whole, or in part. Any player substitutions may be recorded as current shift substitutions or recorded as players for the following shift.   However, once play begins and an Action card is needed, shift changes must occur.
  1. Exposed Line Change cards are to be placed at center ice and announcement must be made that there is a pending line change.  Failure to do so forfeits any team’s opportunity to call Out-or-Position penalties until the announcement is made.  Once the announcement is made, any team(s) unaware of the shift change may make their appropriate player changes without being penalized.
  2. If a coach must fill a position in which no proper player is available, the following procedure must be used to determine the best available player:
  1. A proper positioned player playing consecutive shifts but not exceeding shift limitations, then
  2. An out-or-position player who will not exceed any shift limitations.  However, only a forward may substitute for another forward, and a defenseman may only substitute for another defenseman.
  3. A proper positioned player may play an extra shift, thus exceeding the shift limitations.
  1. The Fatigued/Out of Position Handicap

  1. When a coach is forced to ice players fatigued or out of position, that coach must announce this at the beginning of the player’s shift, and the following handicaps are applied to the aforementioned player:
  1. The Offense rating is decreased by 1;
  2. The Defense rating is 1;
  3. The Penetration rating is 1;
  4. The Intimidation rating is -1;
  5. The Face-off rating is decreased by 1;
  6. The Tendency rating is decreased by 1;
  7. The Passing rating is decreased by 1;
  8. This player cannot attempt to skate short-handed;
  9. Inside shots are taken with reference to the Outside Shot column;
  10. Breakaway/Rebound shots are taken with reference to the Inside Shot column;
  11. During Opponent Defense Ratings 1 thru 6, the opposing coach has the choice of either:
  1. The result from the fatigued card or
  2. An outside shot for the puck carrier.
  1. Opponent Defense 7, 8, 9, 10 & 11 are now considered a penalty.
  2. Opponent Defense Ratings 12, 13 & 14 are now considered an outside shot for the puck carrier.
  3. The Passing Ratings are reduced as follows:
  1. Super Passers are no longer considered ‘Super’, but retain their Passing L.
  2. Passing L players become Passing K players and Passing {C, D, H I, L} are now considered ‘Lose to Opponent’.
  3. Passing K players become Passing J players and Passing {B, F-G, K} are now considered ‘Lose to Opponent’.
  4. Passing J players become zero passers and Passing {A, D, J} are now considered ‘Lose to Opponent’.
  5. Zero passers still suck.
  1. Any fatigued player remains fatigued until the intermission between periods, with the exception of the intermission before overtime of a regular season game.  
  1. The ‘Ready Rule’

  1. To indicate that game play may continue during shift changes and stoppages in play, the following procedure must occur in the given order:
  1. The visiting team ices their players and announces that they are ready,
  2. The home team ices their players and announces that they are ready,
  3. The visiting team chooses their Play Selectors, and announces their decision,
  4. The home team chooses their Play Selectors, and announces their decision,
  5.  Play can now continue with the flipping of Action or Split Deck cards.
  6. Once the first Action or Split Deck card is flipped, Out-of-Position penalties may be called.
  7. No player substitutions may be made until the next line change or stoppage in play.
  1. The Penalty Timer

  1. Face-offs won by the powerplay team move the timer one space.
  2. Face-offs won by the short-handed team move the timer:
  1. One space, if the face-off is in the end zone of the short-handed team, or
  2. Four (4) spaces, otherwise.
  1. A successful icing moves the timer five (5) spaces.
  2. A successful skating moves the timer three (3) spaces.
  3. Any other flip of the Split Deck during game play moves the timer one space.
  4. Any flip of an Action card moves the timer six (6) spaces.
  5. A Goalie Rating moves the timer one space.  However, do not move the timer for any resulting actions of a Goalie Rating.  (i.e., Rebounds, spreads, etc…)
  6. Anytime the Penalty Timer lands on or passes 7, 13 or 19+, an Action Card is flipped, but not read.
  7. Finish whatever action took the timer to 19 (or the end of the powerplay) as if it is on the powerplay.
  1. Determining Assists

  1. After a goal is scored, to determine the player(s) who will receive an assist, use the following procedure:
  1. Credit, to a maximum of two assists, any players who directly contributed to the goal by either:
  1. A pass (determined from the Split Deck card), and/or
  2. Any initial shots leading to rebounds, (if the goal was scored on a rebound), and/or
  3. Any player causing a turnover during a pass interception.  See the Pass Interception Section.
  1. If two assists have yet to be awarded on the goal, draw a Split Deck card, and refer to the Assist Section to determine the remaining assists.
  1. If the Assist Section states “One Assist Only”, then only determine a maximum of one assist for the goal.
  2. If provided, consider the “Any Player” condition identified in the Assist Section to determine the players who earn the remaining assist(s).   Any players that have an Assist Rating higher than the condition provided are rewarded with an assist.  
  3. If more players qualify then are required, award the assists to the players with the higher Assist ratings.   If some of the players have the same Assist Rating and a tie breaker is required, continue through the list provided in the Assist Section for the affected players only.
  4. If not enough players qualify using the “Any Player” condition, then continue through the list provided in the Assist Section until enough assists are determined.
  1. An asterisk (*) beside a player’s Assist Rating denotes that the Assist Rating is to be lowered by one during powerplay goals.
  1. Time of a Goal

  1. To determine the time that a goal is scored, refer to the Split Deck card used to determine the assists, and use the following formula:
  1. [Number of Action Cards discarded – 1] *40 + [2 * The top number of the Split Deck card]
  1. The earliest time to be recorded for a goal at the beginning of a period is 0:04.
  2. The latest time to be recorded for a goal in a period is 19:59.  (4:59 for regular season overtime period).
  3. The fastest time recorded between goals is 4 seconds.  Any times calculated that fall before this, should be adjusted to this limit.
  1. Roll of the Dice (Rich Rule!)

  1. A roll of the dice is considered valid if its final resting position is on the game board or playing table and it is easy to identify the 'Gravity-Bound Face’ (GBF).
  2. Any die or dice that does not rest under these conditions must be re-rolled.
  3. “Pat” rolls are generally frowned upon.

Section E - Game Play

  1. Face-Offs

  1. Face-off locations:
  1. Each game and period begins with a face-off at center ice.
  2. Face-offs that occur due to a goal are to be taken at center ice.
  3. Face-offs that occur due to a saved shot on goal are to be considered in the end zone of the defending goaltender.
  4. Face-offs that occur as a result of a goaltender penalty are considered to be in the end zone of the said goaltender.
  5. Face-offs that occur due to Opponent Defense Penalties are to be taken at center ice.
  6. Face-offs due to Intimidation Penalties are to be taken in the end zone where the penalty occurred.  If the opposing team receives a penalty (or penalties) that meets or exceeds the total minutes of the intimidating team, the face-off is to be moved to center ice.
  7. Face-offs due to an injury to the attacking team are to be taken at center ice.
  8. Face-offs due to an injury to the defending team are to be taken in the end zone of the defending team.
  9. Face-offs after a saved penalty shot are taken in the end zone of the goaltender that faced the penalty shot.
  10. Teams that are penalized during stoppages in play (Fight Challenges, etc) cannot begin their penalty-kill face-offs in the attacking zone.  These face-offs are moved to center ice, or remain in their team’s defending zone.
  1. Each team must declare which player is taking the face-off.  For center ice face-offs, any players filling the Center position are mandated to take the face off unless they have been removed as a result of the Face-Off Chart.
  2. Goaltenders may not take face-offs.
  3. Defensemen may not take face-offs at neutral ice nor in their defending zone unless all other forwards have been ejected from the face-off.
  4. Any player without a Center position on his card and has an original Face-off rating of zero has his Face-off rating decreased by one during all face-offs.
  5. Once the two centermen are determined, the Face-off Chart is used to determine the result of the face-off.  To use the chart,
  1. Determine the difference between the two centermen’s Face-off Ratings,
  2. Add any bonuses to the difference for man-advantages, Face-off Specialist, etc, then
  3. Take a Split Deck card and refer to the top number
  4. Using the Face-Off Chart, cross-reference the number from the Split Deck card with the difference calculated between the centermen to determine the result.
  1. If the natural centerman is not taking the face-off, then any other skater may take the face-off in his place.  Follow this procedure:
  1. Switch the natural centerman with the substitute centerman.  Placing the player cards several inches from the game board indicates this switch
  2. After the face-off, the switched centermen return to their natural positions unless the team using the switch loses the face-off in their own end zone.  These two players must apply the Fatigued/Out-of-Position Handicap if they are not eligible to play their current positions.  These two players may switch back to their natural positions once their team gains control of the puck, or during the next stoppage in play.
  1. If the center position is empty due to a penalty, the player chosen to take the face-off is not considered out of position.
  2. If the natural centerman is not taking the face-off, and one of the switched players recovers the puck once play begins, then the player with the puck retains possession of the puck when the players switch back to their natural positions.
  3. If the attacking team wins the face-off in their opposition’s end, then the player who gains control of the puck has an Outside Shot.  That player can choose to penetrate, pass, or shoot.
  4. The person taking the face-off can recover a face-off awarded to “any player”.
  5. A face-off awarded to a player-less position results in a ‘Loose puck’.
  1. Shooting

  1. There are three types of shots:  The Outside shot, the Inside shot, and the Breakaway/Rebound shot.  To attempt any shot, roll two dice and refer to the appropriate column on the shooter’s card for the result.  The following are the possible results and their explanations:

Result

Explanation

X – <player>

Indicates a shot that was saved by the goaltender.  The player indicated after the “X” is the defensive player who recovers the puck after the save.

If the said Defensive player’s position is empty, the result is a rebound.

X – any D-player

Indicates that a save was made and the puck was recovered by any defensive player

Lose Puck to <designated or any> player

Indicates that the attempted shot was unsuccessful.  The designated, or chosen, player has control of the puck and an Action Card is selected to continue play.

If the puck is awarded to an empty position, it is a “loose puck” situation.

X - Face-off

Indicates that the shot was saved and held by the goaltender. A face-off follows.

Goal

The player shooting the puck scores a goal.

Goal 1-?

The outcome is determined by the Split Deck.  Draw a Split Deck card and refer to the top number.  If the number is falls within, and including, the indicated range, the result is a goal.

Otherwise, there is no goal, and there is a face-off in the end zone of the same goaltender.

Goalie Rating

The outcome is determined by the goaltender’s card.

The attacking coach rolls two dice, and refers to the appropriate number on the goaltender’s card for the outcome.

Note:  When the result from the goalie card suggests a ‘Breakaway’, determine the player using the ‘Penalty Shot Chart’

Goal+, Goal 1-?+, and Goalie Rating+

Treated as a Goal, Goal 1-?, and Goalie Rating counterparts, but ONLY during powerplay opportunities.  During even-strength and short-handed opportunities, it is treated as an X–Face-off.

X - Reb

Indicates that the save was made by the goaltender, but the puck has bounced free with the potential for a rebound.  Unless a Deflection is attempted, draw a Split Deck card and refer to the Rebound section.  This may yield 4 results:

An unconditional rebound to an offensive player

An unconditional rebound recovery to a defensive player

A conditional rebound to an offensive player.  The offensive player’s Offensive rating must meet or exceed the value indicated on the Split Deck card to successfully recover the rebound.  If the condition isn’t met, this player’s Natural opponent recovers the rebound.

For all Even-Strength rebounds and offensive rebounds to a Short-Handed player, the offensive player’s Offense rating is reduced by one (1) if his natural opponent has an even-strength 5-defense rating.  The Offence rating is reduced by two (2) if the Natural opponent has a 6-defense rating.  Reduced by three (3) for a 7-defense rating.

A conditional rebound to a defensive player.  The defensive player’s Defensive rating must meet or exceed the value indicated on the Split Deck card to successfully recover the rebound.  If the condition isn’t met, this player’s Natural opponent takes the rebound shot.

Unless the original shot was an EPP shot, any rebounds that are awarded to an empty position are recovered by this position’s Natural opponent.  If the Natural opponent doesn’t exist, the result is a Loose puck.

  1. Determining the Primary Opponent

  1. When an offensive player has an Outside Shot, that player can choose to pass, penetrate or shot.  Some actions require the determination of a Primary Opponent.
  2. Use the chart below to determine the Primary Opponent.

Environment

Last Action Card Value

Primary Opponent

Even Strength, or 5-on-6

1-20

Natural Opponent

Even Strength, or 5-on-6

21-25

Left Defenseman

Even Strength, or 5-on-6

26-30

Right Defenseman

Powerplay,

6-on-5,

6-on-4,

6-on-3.

N/A

Natural Opponent

4-on-4,

3-on-3

N/A

Natural Opponent

Against Powerplay

N/A

Natural Opponent

  1. Deflections

  1. If an outside shot by a player in the defenseman’s position results in a “X-Reb”, the Offensive coach may choose to try for a deflection or allow the play to continue with the rebound.  If the coach elects to try a deflection, then:
  1. The Offensive coach rolls one die and refers to the Deflection Chart to determine which forward will attempt the deflection.
  2. The Offensive coach then rolls two dice and refers to that forward’s Inside Shot column to determine the result of the deflection.
  3. Any results of Goalie Rating or Goal <Spread> (and Goalie Rating+ and Goal <Spread>+ for powerplays) are treated as such with the deflector credited with the shot and (potential) goal.  All other outcomes are treated as a save by the goaltender, the shot is credited to the player in the defenseman’s position, and the save is recovered by any player of the Defensive coach’s choice.
  1. Penetrations

  1. When an offensive player has an outside shot (not only) and the Primary Opponent is determined, that player may try to penetrate to obtain an inside shot.  
  2. Once the declaration to penetrate has been announced, then flip the Secondary Action Deck and retrieve the number in the bottom right hand corner (ie 1 through 30)
  3. Using the Tendency Chart, cross reference this number with the offensive player’s Tendency rating to determine if the player proceeds with the penetration against the Primary Opponent, an alternative opponent, or is forced to pass against the Primary Opponent.
  4. Note the Breakaway/Penetration rating of the offensive player with the puck.
  1. Determine the Defensive Opponent and the Defensive rating (if necessary) from the chart below.

Environment

Defensive Rating

Even Strength or 5-on-6

Defense Rating of Defensive Opponent

5-on-4,

5-on-3,

6-on-5,

6-on-4,

6-on-3.

4-on-4,

3-on-3,

Against Powerplay

No Defensive Rating is required.  Refer to the Penetration Chart.

  1. Using (i) the Penetration rating of the offensive player, (ii) the defensive rating of the opponent (if applicable) and (iii) the game environment (Powerplay, etc…), refer to the Penetration Chart to determine the range needed to successfully penetrate.
  2. Draw a Split Deck card and refer to the top number.  If the number falls within the determined range, then the player is awarded with an inside shot.  Otherwise, the Defensive Opponent has taken control of the puck.  If there is no Defensive Opponent in this position, the result is a Loose-puck.
  1. Passing

  1. When a player has an outside shot (not only), he may attempt a pass to award one of his linemates by following this procedure:        
  1. The attacking coach announces that the player is attempting a pass,
  2. The defending team may attempt a Pass Interception at this stage.
  3. If no interception is attempted, or if the interception is unsuccessful, then draw a Split Deck card and refer to the Passing Section.  Below are the possible results:For any unsuccessful passes that result is a reading of ‘Lose to Opponent’, the puck is recovered by the passer’s natural opponent.

Result

Description

Lose puck.  Defensive player has control

The pass was unsuccessful and the puck was recovered by the opposition.

Note:  Special conditions for recovery by the Shadow

Inside shot for <designated player>

The pass was successful and an inside shot is awarded to the designated player.  The opposition may be awarded with an Intimidation opportunity.

Passing J or K

Refer to the passing column of the player with the puck for the result.

Passing L

Refer to the passing column of the player with the puck.  If the result is an Inside Shot, then cross-reference that player’s Assist Rating to the Passing L Chart to see if the successful pass is upgraded to a breakaway, or possibly reduced to an Outside shot.

On a powerplay, use the unadjusted Assist Rating when referring to the Passing L chart.

Passing Against E, SH, PP

Refer to the result defined under E, SH or PP if the pass is being attempted against even-strength, against Short-Handed, or against Powerplay respectively.  Special exceptions are made for the Super Passers.

  1. No player can complete a pass to himself. If a forward, whose team has five skaters on the ice, completes a pass to his current position then make the following substitutions:

RW to C

C to LW

LW to RW

  1. If a forward, whose team has 6 skaters on the ice, completes a pass to his current position then make the following substitutions:

RW to C

C to LW

LW to 6th skater

  1. If a player completes a pass or breakaway that would reward the puck to either (1) himself or (2) a playerless position, then reward the pass or breakaway to the next most logical player.  (i.e. another forward position)
  2. Whenever a pass substitution is made and there is a corresponding intimidation awarded to the opposition, then the intimidation will be substituted as well.  Make the following changes:

If the shot is now awarded to…

…And the intimidation was…

…Then change it to…

RW or RD

RD

LD

RW or RD

RW

LW

LW or LD

LD

RD

LW or LD

LW

RW

The 6th skater

Whomever

*No intimidation is awarded*

  1. Dump & Chase

  1. When a player has an outside shot (not only), he may attempt a ‘Dump & Chase’.
  2. The offensive coach announces “Dump & Chase” and indicates two things:
  1. Which corner to dump the puck into: “LD’s corner” or “RD’s corner”.  That respective defenseman is considered the ‘Defender’, and
  2. Which forward is going to be the ‘Chaser’.  (Note: RW can only go into the LD’s corner, LW can only go into the RD’s corner, C can go into either corner).   The offensive coach can also choose to send no forward into the corner and give control of the puck to the ‘Defender’.
  1. To determine what happens, the ‘Dump & Chase rating’ must be calculated.  The ‘Dump & Chase rating’ is calculated as follows:
  1. Chaser’s Intimidation rating – Defender’s Defensive rating + Dump & Chase Adjustment
  2. Dump & Chase Adjustment is calculated as:
  1. Chaser’s Intimidation minus Defender’s Intimidation (to a maximum of +2 or a minimum of –2)
  2. + 3, if the offensive team is on the power play
  3. - 4, if the offensive team is shorthanded.
  1. Once the ‘Dump & Chase’ rating is calculated, a Split Deck card is flipped and the Intimidation section is referred to.
  2. If the number in the Intimidation section is equal to or lower than the Dump & Chase rating, it is a successful Dump & Chase and an inside shot is awarded using the Penalty Shot / Possible Breakaway chart.  The Chaser cannot be awarded the inside shot, so use this chart with the appropriate number of eligible shooters/skaters.  If the chart awards the shot to the Chaser, then use the Extra Attacker as an alternative.
  3. If the number is greater than the Dump & Chase rating, the ‘Defender’ gains control of the puck.
  4. If the reading in the intimidation section reads ‘Takes away puck – possible penalty’, refer to the ‘Chaser’s’ Penalty rating and check for a possible penalty.  If there is no penalty, it is a successful Dump & Chase and an inside shot is awarded using the Penalty Shot / Possible Breakaway chart, as above.
  5. If the reading in the intimidation section reads ‘Fails to take away puck – possible penalty’, refer to the ‘Chaser’s’ Penalty rating and check for a possible penalty.  If there is no penalty, it is an unsuccessful Dump & Chase and the ‘Defender’ gains control of the puck.
  1. Intimidations

  1. When a pass resulting in an inside shot is followed by an intimidation reading, a member of the defending team has an opportunity to try and retrieve the puck from the player attempting the shot, thereby eliminating the inside shot.
  2. A player with a negative Intimidation rating may not attempt to intimidate a shooter. (TOM RULE)
  3. Procedure:        
  1. When provided with the opportunity to intimidate, the defending coach has the option to attempt the intimidation, or decline.
  1. Exception - Enforcers and Belt Holders must attempt ALL intimidation opportunities.
  1. Consider special conditions for intimidations that include the Shadow before continuing.
  2. Draw a Split Deck card and refer to the number in the Intimidation Section.
  3. If the number from the Intimidation Section is less than, or equal to, the Defender’s Intimidation Rating, then the intimidation is successful.
  1. Note - Some Split Deck cards have no number in the Intimidation Section.  Instead, they reveal if the intimidation was successful, or not.  They will also announce the possibility of a penalty.
  1. Some of these cards above will specify PP-16.  When the intimidator’s team is short-handed, ignore the possible penalty and consider the Intimidation number to be 16.
  2. If the number from the Intimidation section is 15, then the team that intimidated rolls two 6-sided dice and one 20-sided die.
  1. If all three dice show the same number (i.e. 1-1-1, 2-2-2, 3-3-3, etc.) then there will be a Z-Chart incident.  Roll the 20-sided die and refer to the Z-chart for the outcome.
  2. If both 6-sided dice are the same and there’s no Z-chart incident, then the result is the X-Factor!! For all remaining face-offs of that game, the home team earns a +1 bonus for each X-Factor.  This bonus is nullified if the visiting team has the Nobody-Beats-the-Vis incentive.
  3. If the result is not a Z-Chart, then proceed to the Injury Section to determine if a player is injured.
  4. Regardless of the outcome of the Intimidation-15, that Split Deck card is removed from the deck and randomly resubmitted during the next shuffle.
  1. If the intimidation is successful, the defender recovers the puck, and play continues with a draw of the next Action Deck card.
  2. If the intimidation is unsuccessful, the player with the puck is awarded an inside shot.
  1. Pass Interceptions

  1. When a team has an Outside shot (not only) and announces that they will be attempting a pass, the defending team may attempt to intercept the pass, under these conditions:
  1. The outside shot must occur during an Even-strength or 5-on-6 situation.
  2. The Defensive Opponent must have a 5 or 6 Defense Rating.
  1. Procedure:        
  1. After the offensive coach announces their intention to pass, the defensive coach must announce their intention to attempt or decline the interception.
  2. If attempting to intercept, the defensive coach rolls one die.
  3. The result of the roll and the Defensive Rating of the Defensive Opponent are cross-referenced on the Pass Interception Chart to determine if the interception was successful.
  4. Note:  The possibility of an interception is reduced if the player attempting to pass is a Super Passer.
  5. If the Interception was successful, the result is a loose puck.  Otherwise, the offensive team may continue with their pass attempt.
  6. If the successful interception causes a turnover that results in an outside shot and subsequent goal, then the interceptor shall be awarded an assist before assists are determined from the Passing Section on the Split Deck Card.
  1. Loose Puck

  1. A Loose Puck occurs as a:
  1. Result of a face-off to a playerless position;
  2. Result of a rebound to a mutually empty position;
  3. Result of an icing to a playerless position;
  4. Result of an unsuccessful penetration to a playerless position;
  5. Any other situation where a loose puck is granted explicitly;
  1. To determine the player that recovers the Loose Puck, draw a Split Deck card, and refer to the Loose Puck section.
  1. If the puck is recovered by a playerless position, then refer to the secondary reading on the same Split Deck card for an alternative position.
  1. Any player that initiates a loose puck cannot recover the puck.  Use the secondary reading on the same Split Deck card for an alternative position.  If the secondary position is also inappropriate, then make the same substitutions used for passing to determine the resulting position.
  1. Intentional Icing

  1. During an even-strength situation and a team wants a stoppage in play, they may obtain this result by icing the puck.
  2. Procedure:
  1. Once a team has possession of the puck and game play is waiting for a card from the Action Deck, the coach must announce they are attempting to ice the puck.
  2. Draw a Split Deck card and refer to the Icing Section.
  3. If the result is “Puck iced…” then the icing is successful.  Play stops and a face-off occurs in the end zone of the team who iced the puck.
  4. If the result is “Puck intercepted….”, then the icing is unsuccessful.  Play continues with the resulting inside shot.
  5. For every two successful icings in the same period, an Action card must be flipped to compensate for the time lost to normal game play.  No action is read from the Action card.
  1. Goalie Fatigue

  1. All goaltenders begin each game Rested.  However, some circumstances can cause a goaltender to “tire” which leads to a deterioration of the goaltender’s ability.   There are four levels of fatigue.  Any time a goaltender tires, that goaltender advances to the next fatigue level.

Level

Description

Effects on Goaltender Card

1

Rested

No changes

2

Fatigued

All references of “Face-off •” are changed to “Goal”

3

Exhausted

All references of “Face-off •” are changed to “Goal”

All references of “Rebound” are changed to “Goal”

All references with “Save – recovered by…” are changed to “Rebound”

4

Debilitated

All references of “Face-off •” are changed to “Goal”

All references of “Rebound” are changed to “Goal”

All references with “Save – recovered by…” are changed to “Rebound”

Any references to a “Face-off” (Including any missed Penalties and missed Breakaway opportunities leading to face-offs) are changed to “Goal”

  1. A goaltender ‘tires’:
  1. Every time the goaltender allows four goals within the same period;
  2. Every time the goaltender allows six goals within the same game.
  1. Pulling the Goaltender

  1. Sometimes a team may announce to pull their goaltender so that they may ice an additional attacker.
  1. If the announcement is made during a stoppage in play, then:
  1. Remove the goaltender from the playing board, and
  2. The goaltender’s team must move their play selectors to the 3 Offense / 3 Forecheckers position, and
  3. The extra attacker may be substituted and the on-ice players may be aligned accordingly.  
  1. If the announcement is made during game play, then:
  1. Immediately remove the goaltender from the playing board, and
  2. The goaltender’s team must move their play selectors to the 3 Offense / 3 Forecheckers position.  The opposing team also has the option to modify their Offense / Forechecker selectors at this time.
  3. The extra attacker may not join the play until the action from one Action card, or two Split Deck cards is completed;
  1. If the extra skater is the 6th skater, the players on the ice may be adjusted so that any player may play the 6th position provided all other players are playing eligible positions.  This 6th skater also has the benefit of having any Goalie Rating+ and any Goal (Spread)+ on their card enabled as a scoring opportunity.
  2. If the extra skater is the 5th skater, then extra skater may play ANY position without applying Fatigue/Out-of-position handicaps.   This 5th skater does not have any powerplay +’s enabled.  All other players on the ice may be adjusted, but they must play their eligible positions.  
  3. If the extra skater is the 4th skater, then the extra skater and the other forward may play either wing positions without applying the Fatigue/Out-of-Position handicap.  This 4th skater does not have any powerplay +’s enabled
  4. Once the extra attacker is on the ice, then:
  1. If the team was playing even-strength before the pull, then that team is now considered on the Powerplay and their opponent is considered Even Strength;
  2. If the team was playing short-handed (by one skater) before the pull then:
  1. Both teams are now considered Even Strength;
  2. Both teams can still dress special teams as if there was a powerplay,
  3. The Defense values for all players are their even strength (non-bracketed) values.
  4. +’s do not count for either teams.
  5. The Penalty Timer must still be used as if there was a powerplay.
  1. If the team was already on the powerplay before the pull, they are still considered to be on the powerplay.
  1. Once the extra attacker is on the ice, the opposition does NOT alter their Offense references when reading the Action cards, regardless of the environment.
  2. Immediately after the announcement, any shots against the empty net are altered as follows:
  1. Any shots from a player card that result in a scoring opportunity or a roll of 8 are now considered automatic goals.
  1. Note:  ‘+’s do not count as a scoring opportunity unless the shooting team is on the powerplay.
  1. Any missed shots that result in ‘Lose to <defensive player>’ remain the same.
  2. All other shots are considered to be a rebound and are not considered as shots on net.  Deflections are not permitted;
  1. If any enforcer was in effect before the goaltender pull, it remains in effect after the pull.
  2. If the 6th skater is attempting an inside shot, and the intimidation is awarded to the natural opponent, then no intimidation can be attempted.
  3. If the 6th skater has the puck and the Action card makes a reference to the opponent’s defense column, then the result is an outside shot for the 6th skater.
  4. A Lose Puck result will be considered as:
  1. A powerplay in the end zone with the goaltender, and
  2. Even-strength in the end zone with no goaltender.
  1. An extra attacker may play a maximum of four Action cards in a game.
  2. If there are no Action cards remaining AND there is a face-off in the end zone of the remaining goaltender AND the defending team wins the face-off, then the defending team must declare to either ‘End the Period’ or ‘Attempt to score on the empty net’.  If the defending team is attempting to score, follow these instructions:
  1. The defending team flips a Split Deck card and refers to the Icing Section.
  2. If the attempted icing is intercepted, then the attacking team is awarded one inside shot ONLY.  The period ends immediately after this shot.
  3. If the icing is successful and the attacking team loses possession of the puck, then the player who completed the icing is awarded with an Outside shot ONLY – Empty net rules apply EXCEPT a roll of eight (8) is not considered a goal.
  4. All other successful icings result in the end of the period.
  1. If the opposing team is short-handed and attempts an icing and the result is ‘Puck iced, Outside Shot ONLY’, then consider the result as ‘Puck Intercepted, Outside shot ONLY’.
  1. Injuries

  1. Injuries may occur in several situations. For all situations, injuries should be determined immediately before play resumes.
  1. A player could be injured as a result of a rebound.  If so, select a Split Deck card and refer to the Injury section to determine the injured player.  This same Split-Deck card must be removed from the deck and randomly placed in the deck before re-shuffling;
  2. A player may be injured as the result of a high stick or a cheap shot. To determine, roll two dice and refer to the  Possible Injury chart to determine if that player is injured.
  3. There is the possibility of an injury when an Intimidation-15 does not result in a Z-Chart.  To determine:
  1. Flip a Split-Deck card and refer to the Injury section for the potentially injured player.  This same Split-Deck card must be removed from the deck and randomly placed in the deck before re-shuffling.
  1. For a skater, if a [roll of one 6-sided die] x [roll of one 20-sided die] is less than or equal to the player’s NHL games played (as determined from the player’s card), then the injury is negated.  Otherwise the player is injured.
  2. For a goaltender, if the [sum of two 6-sided dice] x [roll of one 6-sided die] is less than or equal to the goaltender’s NHL games played (as determined from the goaltender’s card), then the injury is negated.  Otherwise the goaltender is injured.
  1. To determine the injured body part:
  1. If the injured player is the recipient of a high stick, then roll two dice and refer to the High-Stick Injury Location Chart
  2. For all other injuries, roll two dice and refer to the Injury Location chart.
  1. To determine the duration of an injured player, roll two dice and refer to the Injury Duration chart.
  2. The possible injury length factors are:

Length Factor

Duration

1

Remainder of Period

2

Remainder of Game

3

Remainder of Game + Day-to-Day

4

Remainder of Game + ‘roll of 1 die’ games + Day-to-Day

5

Remainder of Game + ‘sum of 2 dice’ games + Day-to-Day

6

Remainder of Game + ‘sum of 3 dice’ games + Day-to-Day

…Etc…

  1. Whenever a player has a repeat injury to a particular body part, then the duration of that current injury is increased by one factor (See the above chart) for each repeat occurrence to that body part.
  1. The accumulation of these injury occurrences is recorded in each player’s Body Part Injury Accumulation Total.  Each player has an Injury Accumulation Total for every possible body part.
  2. At the beginning of every new season, each player will have their Body Part Injury Accumulation Total reduced by one (1) for each body part
  1. Once the injured player, body part and duration have been determined, then
  1. If the player is a goaltender and the injury is minor (Remainder of game or less), the goaltender’s fatigued rating increases until a stoppage in play.  At which point, the goaltender leaves the game.
  2. If the player is a goaltender and the injury is greater than ‘Remainder of Game’, then play stops immediately.
  3. If the player is a skater and the injury is minor (Remainder of game or less), then the injured player applies the Fatigued/Out-of-Position Handicap.  Play continues until a stoppage in play at which point that player leaves the game.
  4. If the player is a skater and the injury is greater than ‘Remainder of Game’, then the injured player is considered out-of-the-play.  If the injury is to a player that was shooting, there is an immediate stoppage in play.  Otherwise, the player’s position is now playerless and play continues until that injured player’s team gains possession of the puck,  at which point that player leaves the game.
  1. If the non-injured team pulls their goaltender in this situation, then the injured team can declare the ‘this is the crap that’s not so crappy rule’ once a skater gains possession.
  1. Any injuries awarded to empty positions are ignored.
  2. If the injured player is a member of the All-Crappy Team, then the maximum duration they can receive is ‘Remainder of Game’.
  3. If a team has an injured goaltender that must leave the game, only the backup goaltender may replace this goaltender.  A third goaltender may dress only if the backup goaltender also becomes injured and must leave the game.
  4. If a goaltender is responsible for committing a cheap shot, the recipient of the cheap shot is determined using the Goalie Penalty Retaliation Chart, regardless if an Enforcer was deemed the agitator or not.
  5. When a goaltender is pulled, any injuries that would have resulted to this goaltender would occur instead to the 6th skater, if one exists.  Otherwise, there is no injury.
  1. Returning from Injury

  1. Players with ‘Remainder of Period’ or ‘Remainder of Game’ injuries can return to action at the beginning of the next period, or next game respectively.
  2. When a player’s injury is considered Day-to-Day, that player must refer to the Day-to-Day Recovery Chart before every game to determine if he can return from the injury.  
  1. To do this, roll two dice and refer to the nth column, where n will indicate the number of attempts that this player has tried to return from injury while in Day-to-Day status.
  1. Note:  Special consideration is given to players who have the benefit of the team Trainer Incentive.
  1. If a player spends more than nine games in Day-to-Day status, continue to refer to Column 9+
  1. If a player is injured, the coach may still opt to dress the injured player for a game, perhaps if the player is at risk of not meeting his minimum season playing requirements.  However, the player may not play any shifts and the team must still be able to schedule their remaining players through all 12 shifts without any shift violations.  Also, the injured player does not heal during this game towards his recovery.
  1. Game Misconducts, Suspensions and the Discipline Committee

  1. A non-fighting Game Misconduct is awarded to any player who receives:
  1. Three 10-minute misconducts in one game, or
  2. Three 5-minute major penalties in one game, or
  3. A 5-minute penalty due to a high stick penalty, or
  4. A 5-minute penalty due to a cheap shot.
  1. Anytime a player receives a non-fighting game misconduct and/or injures a player due to a high stick or a cheap shot, his incident is reviewed by the Discipline Committee.
  2. The number of suspensions awarded to a player by the Discipline Committee is determined using the Discipline Chart, based on the number of Criteria points for this given incident.
  3. The number of Criteria point is calculated as follows:

TOTAL CRITERIA POINTS (TCP) =

Criteria Points from the # of Game Misconducts

+

Criteria Points from the Repeat Offender Value

(only if there was an injury)

  1. The # of Game Misconducts
  1. Is defined as the number of non-fighting Game Misconducts for the current season by the offending player.  Include the immediate Game Misconduct, if applicable.
  2. Calculate the Criteria points for the incident as follows:

# of game misconducts

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

n

Criteria Points

0

1

3

5

7

9

11

2n-1

  1. Repeat Offender Value (ROV)
  1. Is included in the Total Criteria Points calculation for the incident only if the incident included an injury.
  2. Each player starts the season with an ROV value of four (4) less than the previous season, to a minimum of zero.
  3. A player’s Repeat Offender Value accumulates throughout the year based on the following infractions:

Length of Injury

Caused

Period

Game

Day-to-Day

(dice) + Day-to-Day

Amount added to ROV

1

2

4

Dice + 4

  1. Calculate the number of Criteria points from the Player’s Repeat Offender Value as follows:

ROV

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Criteria Points

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

23

26

29

32

36

40

  1. Any suspensions calculated during the playoffs are cut in half and rounded down.
  2. At the end of the regular season, the length of any remaining suspensions are cut in half and rounded down for the playoffs.

Section F - Types of Penalties

  1. Minor Penalties

  1. A non-coincidental minor penalty lasts a maximum duration of two minutes, or until the powerplay team scores.
  2. Teams may choose to play just one special team during the duration of the penalty.  If no powerplay goal is scored, the powerplay ends after finishing the action that forced the flip of the 3rd Action card.
  1. Major Penalties

  1. Major penalties last for a duration of five minutes, or eight Action cards
  2. Major penalties do not expire if the powerplay team scores.
  3. In a penalty situation where there is 5-minute powerplay awarded, switch special team line-ups at the first convenient opportunity after the fourth Action card has been used.
  4. For statistical purposes, the amount of powerplay chances recorded on the gamesheet is always one greater than the number of goals scored during the major powerplay.  (ie  0 / 1, 1 /2,  2 / 3, 3 /4, …etc)
  1. Four Minute (Double-Minor) Penalties

  1. Double-Minor penalties last for a maximum duration of four minutes, or six Action cards.
  2. Switch special team lines at the first convenient opportunity after the 3rd Action card, OR after the powerplay team scores a goal, whichever occurs first.
  3. If a goal is scored and the Penalty Timer is at 19 or less, then the goal is considered scored during the first powerplay.
  1. Two Man Advantage Penalties

  1. If only minor penalties are involved, then shifts are considered to last three Action cards in duration – regardless if a goal is scored or not.
  2. If one or more major penalties are involved, then shifts are considered to be four Action cards in duration, regardless if a goal is scored or not.
  1. Penalty Shots

  1. A penalty shot may be awarded as a result of the Secondary Penalty charts.
  2. To determine the shooter, use Penalty Shot / Possible Breakaway Chart .
  3. To execute the Penalty Shot, the shooter rolls 2 dice and refers to their Rebound/Breakaway column.
  4. Any roll of eight (8) is considered a goal.
  5. Results of Goalie Ratings and spreads as evaluated as normal.
  6. For players with a primary position as LD or RD, Goalie Rating+ and Spread+ values are considered as a missed shot.  All other players treat these powerplay ratings as scoring opportunity.
  7. Any other result is a save.
  1. Out of Position Penalty

  1. Whenever a coach plays anybody out of position, or violates any of the shift rules, the opposing coach can choose one of the following options as soon as the violation is disclosed:
  1. Insist that eligible players be utilized; or
  2. Call a two minute bench penalty to be served by a skater on the ice; or
  3. Insist that the players remain in their present positions applying fatigue/Out-of-Position handicaps.  The opposing coach then forfeits their opportunity to call any further penalties on that shift.  The offending players may then be switched or substituted for at a stoppage in play.
  1. If a player is determined to be playing out of position or violating any of the shift rules and is directly involved in scoring a goal (i.e., goal or assist) then the goal is disallowed if no further play has occurred.
  1. Delayed Penalties

  1. If a player fails to successfully intimidate a puck carrier but is still penalized, then play resumes until the penalized team gains possession of the puck or a goal is scored.  At this time, play is stopped and the penalized player begins his time in the penalty box.  This is known as a Delayed penalty.
  2. If, during a powerplay situation, a delayed penalty is called against the short-handed team AND the powerplay team scores before the original penalty expires, then:
  1. The original penalty is over, and
  2. A new powerplay begins with the latest penalized player in the penalty box.
  1. Gamesheet Violations

  1. If a coach dresses less than the maximum number of players on the gamesheet without playing an unlisted player, the offending coach has a choice of:
  1. Playing as is, with less than the maximum, or
  2. Inserting additional players and receive a 2-minute bench penalty for each player added.
  1. If a player is found playing while not on the gamesheet, consider the following scenarios:
  1. If the offending team has dressed less than the maximum number of players, then:
  1. The offending team receives a 2-minute bench penalty;
  2. The player is added to the gamesheet.
  3. If the violation is determined while the offending team is scoring, the goal is disallowed.
  1. If the offending team has dressed the maximum number of players, then:
  1. The offending team receives a 2-minute bench penalty;
  2. The offending player is ejected from the game. This game is not considered as a game played on their personal stats.
  3. If the violation is determined while the offending team is scoring, the goal is disallowed.
  1. If the offending team has dressed more than the maximum number of players, then:
  1. The offending team receives a 2-minute bench penalty;
  2. The offending coach chooses which player to eject from the game. This game is not considered as a game played on this player’s personal stats.
  3. If the violation is determined while the offending team is scoring, the goal is disallowed.
  1. If an injured player is found playing a shift, then:
  1. The offending team receives a 2-minute bench penalty;
  2. The injured player is ejected from the game. This game is not considered as a game played on their personal stats, nor against their recovery time on the Day-to-Day chart.
  3. If the violation is determined while the offending team is scoring, the goal is disallowed.
  1. If a suspended player is dressed for a game:
  1. The offending team receives a 2-minute bench penalty;
  2. The suspended player is ejected from the game.  This game is not considered as a game played on their personal stats, nor against the time served on their current suspension.
  3. If the violation is determined while the offending team is scoring, the goal is disallowed.
  1. If the starting goaltender is not indicated on the gamesheet, or is indicated incorrectly, then:
  1. The offending team receives a 2-minute bench penalty.
  2. The gamesheet is corrected.
  1. Game Play Penalties

  1. A penalty may result during an Action Card result of Opponent Defense 7 through 11, depending on the defensive player’s card
  1. If the defensive player has an “MC” range on his penalty rating and the Opponent Defense reading falls with this range, then that player will serve an additional 10-minute misconduct.
  1. A penalty may result during an attempted intimidation.  If the Split Deck card indicates a possible penalty, then an additional Split Deck card is selected.  The top number on this Split Deck card is cross-referenced with the intimidator’s Penalty rating on the Penalty Chart.  If the number is:
  1. Above the Penalty Parameter Line, then no penalty is given.
  2. Below the Penalty Parameter Line, then penalties are given.
  1. If a penalty results, either by a Goalie Rating, Opponent Defense rating, or by intimidation, then the Penalty Chart must be consulted.
  2. The Penalty Chart is divided into five penalty ratings, and each penalty rating is divided into two columns.
  1. The left side of each column determines the amount of penalty minutes against the penalized player.
  2. The right side of each column determines the amount of penalty minutes assigned to the opponent indicated during game play.  If no opponent is specified, then consider the penalized player’s Natural Opponent.
  1. To use the Penalty Chart:
  1. Once the penalized player and his opponent have been established, draw a Split Deck card (if one has not already been selected) and cross reference the top number with the two players Penalty ratings to determine the outcome.  However:
  1. If the number on the Split Deck card is a 19 or 20, then refer to the Secondary Penalty charts.
  2. If the number on the Split Deck card is above the Penalty Parameter Line for the penalized player, then roll two dice.  If the result of the dice roll is:
  1. 2, then that penalized player receives a 5-minute high-sticking penalty and a game misconduct.  Ignore the 2-minute penalty that resulted from the Penalty Chart.
  2. 12, then the penalized player receives a 4-minute double minor for high sticking.  Ignore the 2-minute penalty that resulted from the Penalty Chart.
  1. If the penalized player is determined to have received a high sticking penalty, then the opposing player is considered the recipient of the high stick.  Proceed to the Injury Section to determine if the recipient is injured.
  1. The penalized player would have the incident reviewed by the Discipline Committee and could face additional discipline.
  1. Secondary Penalty Charts

  1. To use the Secondary Penalty Charts:
  1. Using the Ferocity Chart, cross reference the two player’s penalty ratings together to obtain the Column number.
  2. Refer to that same column on the 19 or 20 Chart (whichever is indicated) and roll two dice to determine the outcome of the penalties.
  1. If both teams are assessed penalties from the Secondary Penalty Chart, then:
  1. Game play is stopped immediately if both teams are assessed the same amount of minutes or if the attacking team is assessed more minutes than the defending team, or
  2. Game play is permitted to continue if the attacking team is assessed fewer minutes than the defending team.  Play continues until the defending team regains control of the puck or at a regular stoppage in play.
  1. Readings of “7/0”, “5/0”, “4/0”, “5/2”, “5/4”, “7/2”, “12/7”, “GM” and “MP” indicate that the offensive player has been the recipient of a Cheap shot and could be injured.  Refer to the Injury Section to determine the possible injury, its location and duration.
  2. When using the Secondary Penalty charts, a player who receives a major penalty faces a possible game misconduct if the opponent does not receive a major penalty.  To determine the outcome, have the penalized coach roll two dice,
  1. If both dice have the same result (i.e. doubles), then the player may return to the game after serving the major penalty,
  2. Otherwise, the penalized player receives a game misconduct.
  1. Consider the highest priority enforcer for any reference to the Secondary Penalty Chart, if they are on the ice.
  2. If a penalty shot is the outcome from the Secondary Penalty Charts, to determine which player will take the penalty shot, roll one die and refer to the Penalty Shot Chart.   For statistical purposes, a powerplay opportunity is not indicated on the game sheet for a penalty shot.
  3. If no penalty is awarded as a result of the ‘Nobody-Beats-the-Vis’ incentive, then play resumes.  There is no stoppage in play.
  1. Goaltender Penalties

  1. When a goaltender receives a penalty, to determine which opponent agitated the goaltender:
  1. Consider the Enforcer.
  2. If there is no Enforcer, roll one die and refer to the Goalie Penalty Retaliation Chart.
  1. Fights

  1. A fight is considered to occur when players from each team are penalized with a major penalty during the same incident.
  2. To determine who wins the fight:
  1. First, determine the Goon Bonus, then
  2. Have each fighter roll one die concurrently.
  1. On the initial roll, if the sum of the two dice is:
  1. 3 or 11 – then each fighter receives an additional 10-minute misconduct.
  2. 2 or 12 – then each fighter receives an additional 10-minute misconduct + a game misconduct.  This also results in an on-ice brawl.  All players on the ice must roll two dice against the Fight Chart
  1. Keep rolling the dice until one fighter accumulates a total of 20.  That fighter is considered the winner.  However,
  1. Extra rolls may be awarded to the player who has the Pugilist Incentive.
  2. Any die whose final resting position is not on the playing table shall not be re-rolled.  It is considered ‘a swing and a miss’.
  3. If both fighters exceed 20 on the same roll, the fighter with the highest total is considered the winner.
  4. If both fighter exceed 20 on the same roll AND are tied in accumulated points, then keep rolling the dice until a higher total is determined.  The fighter with the higher total is considered the winner.
  1. If a goaltender becomes involved in a fight then each player on the ice must roll two dice against the Fight Chart, and
  1. If the initial punches of a fight that includes a goaltender result in a 2 or 12, then the consequence is a bench-clearing brawl.  All players from both teams must roll two dice against the Fight Chart.  The home team has the advantage of pairing up opponents.
  1. If there is currently an on-ice brawl or a bench clearing brawl, and the initial punches for any of the fights result in a 2 or 12, then the outcome is only a 10-minute misconduct + a game misconduct for each fighter.  No additional on-ice brawls will result.
  2. Unless protected with the Lawyer, any player who is penalized during a bench-clearing brawl must roll a 20-sided die.  If the result of the roll is less than or equal to the total minutes in penalties assessed to that player then that player receives a one-game suspension following the game.
  1. Challenging an Opponent to a Fight

  1. Only Enforcers may challenge other players to a fight.
  2. Each team is limited to only one challenge per game.
  3. Challenges can only occur:
  1. During regulation time, and
  2. At a stoppage in play BEFORE any player substitutions are made.
  1. Procedure for challenging an opponent:
  1. At the appropriate time, the Challenger announces which recipient they are challenging,
  2. The recipient will choose to accept or decline the challenge.  
  3. If the challenge is accepted, then a fight occurs and:
  1. The challenger receives a 7-minute penalty plus a game misconduct, and
  2. The recipient receives a 5-minute fighting major penalty.
  3. This Challenger cannot subsequently be challenged to a fight during this game as they are considered ejected.
  1. If declined, then:
  1. The recipient is immediately considered a Turtle and receives no penalty.
  2. The challenger receives a 2-minute penalty plus a 10-minute misconduct.

Section G - Penalty Situations

  1. Penalty Alignments

  1. Penalized players must serve their penalized time in the Penalty Box.  However, if a goaltender is penalized with any penalty other than a game misconduct, then a skater from the ice will serve the goaltender’s time in the Penalty Box.
  2. If players from both teams become penalized during the same infraction then:
  1. The team with the fewer penalty minutes is awarded a powerplay whose duration is determined by the difference in penalty minutes, but:
  1. All penalized players must serve their entire penalized time, and
  2. The team with the greater penalized minutes must have a skater from the ice sit in the penalty box for the duration of the powerplay.  This player will exit the penalty box when the powerplay expires, and
  3. The original penalized players will be released from the penalty box:
  1. After their penalty minutes expire, and
  2. During a stoppage in play.
  1. If both teams are penalized the same amount of minutes, then:
  1. All players serve their time in the penalty box,
  2. There is no powerplay awarded, and
  3. Substitute skaters must be used to replace the penalized players, unless:
  1. Both teams are at full strength AND both players receive a 2-minute minor penalty, then no replacements are used.
  1. The shorthanded players’ Opponent Defense values 12, 13 & 14 are dependent on their bracketed (?) Defense values, where applicable, as follows:

Opponent Defense Value

Bracketed Defense Value

12

13

14

4

Takes away puck

Takes away puck

Takes away puck

3

Takes away puck

Takes away puck

Outside shot

2

Takes away puck

Outside shot

Outside shot

1

Outside shot

Outside shot

Outside shot

  1. For any bench penalty, a skater who was on the ice during the infraction must serve the penalty.
  2. Failure to place the proper penalized player in the penalty box is considered an Out-of-position penalty.
  3. Only a player whose primary position is center may play any forward position during a short-handed situation.
  4. If a powerplay goal is scored during a delayed penalty call, then the original penalty is considered over and a new powerplay is commenced with the player(s) assessed during the delayed penalty serving their appropriate penalties.
  5. Below are a few non-full strength situations and their alignments:

5 on 4

The short-handed team leaves one forward position vacant.

5 on 3

The short-handed team leaves two of the forward positions vacant.

4 on 4

Not a powerplay, and both teams leave the center position vacant

4 on 3

The powerplay team leaves one forward position vacant.

The short-handed team leaves two of the forward positions vacant.

3 on 3

Not a powerplay, and both teams leave the RW & LW positions vacant.

  1. Actions by the Short-handed Team

  1. When the short-handed team gains control of the puck in their own end or at center-ice, they can attempt:
  1. An offensive action, which is performed by drawing an Action card and referring to the short-handed section.
  2. To ice the puck, which is performed by drawing a Split Deck card and referring to the Icing Section.
  1. Possible results are:

Result

Description

Puck intercepted

The designated powerplay player gets an inside shot after stealing the puck.

Puck iced – PP team loses puck.  SH player has control

The puck was successfully iced and the designated short-handed player gains control.

Puck iced – outside shot ONLY

The puck was successfully iced and the designated powerplay player must take an outside shot.

Puck iced – SH position defense #

Refer to the designated short-handed player’s defensive rating (12, 13, or 14).

The short-handed player will either gain control of the puck, or failing that, his natural opponent has an outside shot.

If the SH position is empty, the result is an outside shot for the natural opponent of the empty position.

  1. To skate with the puck, which is performed by rolling a 20-sided die and also flipping and ignoring a Split Deck card.  If the result of the die falls:
  1. Within the player’s skating rating then that player retains control of the puck,
  2. Within the player’s Breakaway rating then that player is awarded a short-handed breakaway,
  3. Outside the player’s skating rating then that player loses control of the puck to his natural opponent who is then awarded with an outside shot.
  1. Ending the Period with a Penalty

  1. If an Opponent Defense penalty occurs on the 30th Action card of a period, then the powerplay starts immediately during said period.  The period ends immediately after:
  1. Finishing the action that took the Penalty Timer to the point where the 31st Action card would have been used.  In this case, the timer only moves to the next flip point.
  2. A powerplay goal is scored.
  1. One of the following possibilities will end the period during a powerplay:
  1. Powerplay team must flip an Action card with no Action cards remaining.
  1. Randomly choose an Action card from the unused deck and refer to the powerplay section.
  2. The team must take any shot if awarded, without any opportunities for rebounds.
  1. Offensive action (rebound, face-off in end)
  1. Take the shot, if awarded, without any rebound
  1. Goalie Rating or Spread
  1. All goals count
  2. The period ends for any goaltender saves.
  1. Intimidation
  1. Complete the inside shot, if awarded, without any rebound
  1. Short-handed team attempting an Offensive action without any Action cards remaining
  1. Randomly choose an Action card from the unused deck and refer to the short-handed section.
  2. Short-handed team must take any awarded shot.  No rebounds are awarded.
  1. Skating
  1. If successful skating, the period is over
  2. If a breakaway results, take the shot, but no rebounds are awarded.
  3. If the attempted skating is unsuccessful, then the powerplay team must take an outside shot ONLY, but no rebounds are awarded.
  1. Icing
  1. If intercepted, take the shot, but no rebounds are awarded.
  2. If the icing is successful and there are:
  1. Five (5) spaces to the flip point on the Penalty Timer, then any awarded shots must be taken, and no rebounds are awarded.
  2. Four (4) spaces of less to the flip point on the Penalty Timer, then the period is over.  No shot is awarded.
  1. Ending Power Play Opportunities

  1. Short-handed player makes a successful skate
  1. The short-handed team retains the puck, and
  2. Replace the specialty teams with even-strength shifts.
  1. Short-handed player makes an unsuccessful skate
  1. The natural opponent on the powerplay team gains control of the puck and has the SEPP options.
  1. Short-handed team attempts to ice the puck
  1. If the icing is successful and the short-handed team gains control of the puck, make shift transitions leaving the puck at the present position.
  2. If the icing is successful and the powerplay team is awarded an outside shot ONLY’, then the shot is considered an EPP shot.
  3. If the powerplay team intercepts the icing attempt, the powerplay team is awarded an EPP inside shot, or
  4. If the powerplay team is awarded an outside shot, the have the SEPP options.
  1. Short-handed team goes on Offense
  1. If the short-handed team is awarded an outside shot, they have SEPP options.
  2. If the short-handed team is awarded an inside shot, it is considered an EPP shot.
  3. If the powerplay team takes away the puck but is not awarded with a shot, make any shift transitions and leave the puck in its current position.
  4. If the powerplay team is awarded an inside shot, it is considered an EPP shot.
  1. Powerplay team attempts an Offensive action, (from the Action card)
  1. If the powerplay team is awarded an outside shot, they have the SEPP options.
  2. If the powerplay team is awarded outside shot ONLY, it is considered an EPP shot.
  3. If the powerplay team is awarded an inside shot, it is considered an EPP shot.
  4. If the short-handed team takes away the puck but is not awarded a shot, then make any shift transitions and leave the puck in its current position.
  5. If the short-handed team is awarded an outside shot, they have SEPP options.
  6. If the short-handed team is awarded a possible breakaway, then
  1. If the breakaway is awarded, then it would result in an EPP breakaway shot, or
  2. If the breakaway is not awarded, then the powerplay team recovers the puck and the teams make any shift transitions.  Leave the puck in its current position.
  1. Powerplay team attempts to penetrate (to take the timer to 19)
  1. If the penetration is successful, it is considered an EPP shot.
  2. If the penetration is unsuccessful and…
  1. …There is a natural opponent, then the natural opponent gains control of the puck and the teams make any shift transitions.  The puck stays in its current position.
  2. …There is no natural opponent, then the result is a loose puck situation with powerplay conditions.  Once the puck is awarded to a player, the penalized player immediately returns to the ice and it is considered an even-strength situation.  Make shift transitions at the first at the first convenient opportunity.
  1. Powerplay team attempts to pass (to take the timer to 19)
  1. If the pass is successful, the shot is an EPP shot.
  2. If the pass is unsuccessful and…
  1. …The designated opponent is there to recover the puck, and then make any shift transitions and leave the puck in its current location.
  2. …The designated position is empty, and then the result is a loose puck situation with powerplay conditions.  Once the loose puck is awarded to a player, the penalized player returns to the ice and it is then considered an even-strength situation.  Make any shift transitions at the first convenient opportunity.
  1. An attempted intimidation (takes the timer to 19)
  1. If the intimidation was successful, the powerplay is over.  Make any shift transitions and leave the puck in its current position.
  2. If the intimidation was unsuccessful, and…
  1. …The powerplay team is not penalized, then the powerplay team is awarded an EPP shot.
  2. …The powerplay team is penalized, then no shot is awarded and the play is stopped.  The current powerplay is over.  Make shift transitions as required.
  1. A Goalie Rating (takes the timer to 19)
  1. A goal is considered a powerplay goal.
  2. A face-off or any penalties signify the end of the powerplay.  Make any shift transitions as required.
  3. A breakaway is considered to be an even-strength situation with the penalized player returning to the ice.  No players may be substituted from the bench, but players on the ice may be rearranged before the breakaway is awarded.
  4. A ‘Save-<some defensive player>’ signifies the end of the powerplay.  Make any shift transitions.
  5. If the result is a rebound, the determination of the rebound itself is considered to be under powerplay conditions, but any rebound shots are considered to be even-strength.  Once the determination is complete, any penalized players shall return to the ice.  If a rebound shot is awarded, no players may be substituted from the bench, but players on the ice may be rearranged before the shot is taken.
  1. A face-off (takes the timer to 19)
  1. If the face-off results in an outside shot, then that team has SEPP options.
  2. If the face-off is at center ice, make any shift transitions and leave the puck in its current position.
  1. A rebound (takes the timer to 19)
  1. If the defending team recovers the rebound, the powerplay is over.  Make any shift transitions and leave the puck in its current position.
  2. If the offensive team recovers the rebound, the shot is considered an EPP shot.
  1. Attempting a WOO Pass
  1. When the Penalty Timer is at 17 or 18 and the short-handed team has possession of the puck, they may opt to attempt a ‘Woo Pass’ (a pass to the player exiting the penalty box)
  2. To attempt a ‘Woo Pass’, the short-handed team announces they are making a ‘Woo Pass’ (and are encouraged to make a high-pitched ‘woo’ sound), the penalty timer is moved to 19, and refer to the Woo Pass Chart.
  3. Calculating the appropriate column to use from the Woo Chart:
  1. Determine the defense rating of the Woo Pass opponent:
  2. If the puck is at LW or LD, refer to the power-play RD defense rating;
  3. If the puck is at RW or RD, refer to the power-play LD defense rating;
  4. If the puck is at C, average the defense ratings of the power-play defensemen (and round up).  Note that a forward playing the point subtracts two from their defensive rating to a minimum of 1.
  5. Woo Column = [Assist Rating of Player with the puck] + [Breakaway Rating of the player exiting the penalty box] – [Defensive Rating of the Woo Pass Opponent].  
  1.  Positioning Players On and After Penalty Situations

  1. Often, special lines are used in powerplay and short-handed situations.
  2. For penalties not affecting player alignments (10-minute misconducts, etc), these players must wait until the first stoppage in play, after their penalties expire, before exiting the penalty box.
  3. For a team with a player(s) exiting the penalty box and entering the play, there are the following cases to consider:
  1. If the opposing team has an offensive action (i.e. passing, penetrating, shooting, rebound, etc), then:
  1. The penalized player(s) immediately fill positions on the ice and any defensive players out of position must apply the fatigue/out of position handicap.
  2. Any players who were on the powerplay remain in the play until a Convenient Opportunity.  These players are not considered Out-of-Position until the puck leaves the opponent’s endzone.
  1. If the short-handed team has possession of the puck, then:
  1. The penalized player(s) may immediately skate and be replaced by another player and rearranging on-ice players as desired,
  2. Both teams may rearrange their players on the ice, but any players out of position, or playing an illegal shift, must apply the fatigue/out of position handicap.
  1. When a powerplay is over, teams must put on even-strength lines at the first convenient opportunity.
  2. If the powerplay team scores during a two-minute minor penalty and the penalized player has additional penalties, recount the number of Action cards for which the player is to spend in the penalty box.
  3. During a 5-on-3 or 4-on-3 penalty situation when a successful icing takes the Penalty Timer past 19 and an ‘Outside Shot ONLY’ is awarded to the powerplay team, any recoveries by the defending forward positions are considered a loose puck if the team is still short-handed.
  4. During a 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 situation when one team has a player return to the ice that results in a powerplay without a convenient time to make a line change and a powerplay goal is scored, the players remaining on the ice are not considered to be on neither a powerplay nor a short-handed shift for the purposes of shift rules.
  5. If an injury or potential injury is declared from a Flip card BEFORE any players exit the penalty box, these exiting players are exempt from any injuries even though they may have joined the play.

Section H - Definitions

  1. All-Crappy Team

  1. This is a team of players that is created from the worst available cards for each position remaining in the Waiver Pool.  This team should be pre-determined at the beginning of each season.  Any statistics earned by these borrowed players should be included in their career totals.
  2. Players selected for this team can only be injured for a maximum of ‘Remainder of the Game’.
  1. Consecutive Shot Rule

  1. During any one shift, if a team is awarded a shot to “Any Player” (whether it’s an Outside, Inside, Rebound or Breakaway shot), no player may be selected for two consecutive choices unless that player is the only player on the ice with the highest Offense Rating.
  2. If, during the same shift, a player has been chosen for the previous “Any Player” event, then that player cannot be chosen again for the next “Any player with Offense ##” event if other players on the ice fulfill this new condition.
  1. Convenient Opportunity

  1. A convenient opportunity is:
  1. A stoppage of play, or
  2. Just before a team must flip an Action card, or
  3. Just before a team has the choice of flipping an Action card.
  1. EPP (End of Powerplay) Shot

  1. A shot or deflection taken by a specialty team in which the powerplay +’s count, and
  1. Any rebounds to a playerless position are considered an even-strength, loose-puck situation, and
  2. Any rebound shots are considered even-strength.
  1. Goon Bonus

  1. Determined to be the difference between each fighter’s Penalty Rating values, where values are awarded as such:

Penalty Rating

Value

D

0

C

2

B

4

A

6

AA

8

  1. Hot Threshold Value

  1. The average regular season goals against average (G.A.A.) for all the playoff teams.  Each team’s GAA is calculated as:
    (Total Goals Against for the season – Total Empty Net Goals Against) / Games Played.
  1. Natural Opponent

  1. For any player, determined to be the opposing player DIRECTLY across the game board. (I.e., LW-RW, LD-RD, C-C, RD-LD, and RW-LW)
  1. Penalty Parameter Line

  1. On the Penalty Chart, the accentuated line that exists after rows 4, 7, 9, 12 and 15 on the AA, A, B, C and D columns respectively.
  1. Rookie

  1. A rookie is defined to be any player who, at the start of the season, has dressed 24 or fewer regular season games in his career.
  1. SEPP (Standard End of Powerplay) Options

  1. At the end of a powerplay, if one of the teams is faced with an outside shot to complete the specialty-team action, they have the following options:
  1. They may take an EPP outside shot; or
  2. They may attempt a Specialty-team pass that, if successful, results in an even-strength shot, or
  3. They may attempt a Specialty-team penetration that, if successful, results in an even-strength shot.  
  1. Any players occupying an invalid position (i.e. a forward playing defense) after the initial SEPP action are considered ‘out of position’.  Applicable handicaps apply
  1. Z-Chart Player Identifier Process

  1. Roll a 6-sided die.  An odd result determines the Visiting team.  An Even result determines the Home team.
  2. Roll a 20-sided die.  This determines the player from the gamesheet, ranked in order of 1 through 18.  Goalies are considered 19 & 20.