Updated 8/31/2016  Click Here to return to Table of Contents

Brown School Handbook

Phone: 508-647-6660

FAX: (508) 647-6668 (office)

Nurse: (508) 647-6662

Attendance Line (Absences and Late Arrivals)

(508) 647-6400 ext. 1161

MAILING ADDRESS

One Jean Burke Drive

Natick, MA  01760

                                                        

Dear Brown School Families,

It is our shared goal that all children who attend the Brown School are safe, happy, and achieving at high levels academically. The partnership between home and school is essential to attaining this goal and cooperation between parents and teachers greatly enhances a child’s learning experience.

The Family Handbook has been compiled to provide valuable information about our school’s policies and procedures as well as an overview of the academic program and opportunities for parental involvement.  To view the Natick School Committee policies you can visit http://natickps.org/Districtinfo/schoolcommittee/main.cfm.

We appreciate you taking time to read over the handbook information to become familiar with its contents.

Sincerely,

Kirk Downing

Principal


Table of Contents

  1. Mission/Vision
  2. Faculty and Staff List
  3. General School Information
  1. Hours
  2. Arrival
  3. Dismissal
  4. Parking
  5. Early Release
  6. School Announcements for Inclement Weather
  7. Bus Passes
  1. Background Checks/ CORI
  2. Natick Residency Policy
  3. Kindergarten and First Grade Entrance Policy
  4. Health Services and Guidelines
  5. Student Records
  6. Visiting School
  7. Safety and Security
  8. Communications
  9. Dress Code
  10. Lunch Program
  11. Parent Teacher Conferences
  12. Teacher Qualification
  13. Food and Party policy
  14. Gift Giving
  15. Programs and Services
  16. Elementary Learning Standards
  17. School Governance
  1. School Committee
  2. School Council
  3. Special Education Parents Advisory Council        
  1.  Volunteer Organizations
  1. Parent-Teacher Organization
  2. Parents Coordinating Council
  3. Natick Educational Foundation
  1. Student Rights and Responsibilities
  2. Internet Acceptable Use Policy
  3. Sexual Harassment, bullying, hazing policy
  4. Physical Restraint of Students

Brown School Mission and Vision

Mission Statement

At Brown School, we provide a safe learning environment that inspires all children to grow socially, emotionally and academically.

Vision Statement

The Brown School community envisions an education of excellence for our children to ready them for the challenges of the new millennium.


BROWN SCHOOL FACULTY AND STAFF 2015-2016

Administration Team

Principal

Kirk Downing

Administrative Assistant

Mrs. Christine Crosby

Receptionist

Mrs. Karen Cushing

Counselor

Ms. Isabel Conesa

Nurse

Mrs. Pauline Santino, (508) 647-6662  (general), (508) 647-6661 (absences)

Grade Level Classroom Teachers

Kindergarten

Mrs. Leslie Barnes

Ms. Kathie Hurley

Mrs. Kimberly Krug

Mrs. Danielle Miller

Mrs. Jennifer Risi

Grade 1

Ms. Mariel Cain

Ms. Julia Dmitriev

Ms. Abby Gorman

Mrs. Melissa MacInnes

Mrs. Eileen Newell

Grade 2

Mrs. Pamela Costello

Ms. Lindsay D’Agnelli

Ms. Caroline Hand

Ms. Caitlin Hill

Mrs. Christine Zeliger

Grade 3

Mr. Michael Albert

Ms. Melissa Curtin

Mrs. Kelsey Koha

Mrs. Lisa Quintana

Mr. Jed Stefanowicz

Grade 4

Ms. Angelina Gagne

Mrs. Patti Luke

Ms. Kristina Mandonas

Ms. Melissa Quimby

Special Education Team

Evaluation Team Leader

Mrs. Maria Reardon

Psychologist

Mrs. Kristin Koch

Learning Center

Mrs. Alicia Cohen

Ms. Tonilee Courville

Mrs. Lauren Foutz

Mr. Michael Gentile

Speech and Language

Mrs. Michelle Post

Occupational Therapy

Mrs. Candice Bangert

Physical Therapy

Mr. Branden Westfield

Para Educator

Ms. Jan Bergin

Mrs. Christi Browning

Mrs. Mary Calderon

Ms. Heather Crocket

Para Educator

Mr. Michael D’Alessandro

Mrs. Marcy Lubarsky

Ms. Andrea Martin

Para Educator

Mrs. Sheila O’Reilly

Ms. Grace Schofield

Mrs. Pat Scurlock

English Language Learners Team

ELL Teacher

Mrs. Christie Arnold

ELL Teacher

Mrs. Meghan Krauss

ELL Teacher

Mrs. Rachael Brodsky

Para-Educator

Mrs. Susan Walker

Specialists

Physical Education

Mr. Robert Dombroskas

Mr. Jason MacDonald

Music

Mr. Mark Jodice

Art

Mrs. Michelle Parven

Literacy

Literacy Specialist

Susan Kennedy

Kindergarten Tutors

Ms. Shannen Kelly

Mrs. Chris Kim

Ms. Nicole Penn

Mrs. Tomekia Sterling

Grade 1 Tutors

Mrs. Nicole Janelle

Mrs. Joanna Doyle

Mrs. Elizabeth O’Leary

Custodians

Head Custodian

Jim Hill

Custodian

Bob Harris

Custodian

Gerry Lindsey

Cafeteria

Cook

Lunchroom Monitor

Mrs. Kim Arno

Lunchroom Monitor

Mrs. Gretchen Desantis

Lunchroom Monitor

Mrs. Debbie Iken


General School Information

School Hours:  Grades 1-4  8:30 a.m. - 2:56 p.m.

(Kindergarten 8:30 a.m. - 2:50 p.m.)

Early Release Days:  8:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

(Kindergarten 8:30 a.m. - 12:10 p.m.)

Children should arrive at school between 8:15 a.m. and 8:25 a.m.  Please do not bring your children to school before 8:15 as there is no supervision before this time.  Children will be recorded late if they arrive through the main doors after  8:30 a.m. All students should be seated and ready to learn at 8:30.

Absences and Late Arrivals - CALL IN REQUIRED

Phone  (508) 647-6661 DAY OR NIGHT for Absences & Tardies

Parents are expected to call the school as soon as it is determined that a child will be absent or tardy.  For your convenience an answering machine has been installed in the nurse’s office to receive your call any time, day or night. Please call prior to 8:20 a.m. each day of the absence or tardy. (Do not leave tardy lunch orders on this line.)  See “Lunch Program” on the next page for information on ordering lunches for tardy students.

We encourage your call on the day prior to the child’s absence if you know one will occur (for example medical appointments, out of town visits, etc.).  Any parent who has not notified the school by 8:40 a.m. on the day of the child’s absence will be called by school personnel.  If there is no answer at home, school personnel will contact the parent at work.  Any situation where the parent cannot be reached will be turned over to the Attendance Officer.

Morning Arrival

Parking

Parking is allowed in the front parking lot.  There is no parking on Jean Burke Drive between the hours of 8-9 am and 2-3 pm. Please observe the 10 mph speed limit and remember that u-turns are illegal on Jean Burke Drive.  Also, handicapped parking is available in front of Brown School.  Handicapped parking requires the vehicle to display either a handicapped plate or sticker. Also, please do not reverse park into the parking spaces. Reverse parking creates confusion and congestion in the parking lot.

Jean Burke Drive is open to all traffic including buses and cars.  All cars for student pick-up and drop-off should stay in one line on the right side of Jean Burke Drive as designated. Buses should use the passing lane and proceed to the back of the building for student Drop Off.  Parents who wish to park can use the passing lane to proceed to the parking lot. If you elect to use the passing lane you must park your car in a designated space and escort your child(ren) to the sidewalk using the crosswalk.

Morning Arrival  8:15 to 8:25 am: NO PARKING ON JEAN BURKE DRIVE between 8-9 am.

The Blue Zone is the drop off area for parents who drive their child(ren) to school. Children can be dropped off as early as 8:15 AM when staff members are on duty. All parents must remain seated in the vehicle when you are in the drop off lane. Children need to be on the passenger side of the car to assure a quick drop off line as many parents are trying to get to their various places of employment in a timely fashion.  Staff will be available to assist students who need help getting out of a vehicle.  If a parent wants to assist their own child, he/she can do so by proceeding to the parking area and assisting their child(ren) to the sidewalk.  All students should proceed directly to their line-up areas  upon exiting from buses and cars.

Line up        

Supervision for arrival begins at 8:15 a.m and all students should be in school by 8:25 a.m. The late bell will ring every day at 8:30 a.m. Students are expected to be in their seats and ready for class by 8:30 a.m. On inclimate weather days we will adjust the late bell depending on the impact the weather has on transportation.

For the first two days of school students will line up at designated outdoor line-up stations. Teachers will be outside with name signs beginning at 8:15 a.m. each day. Additional staff members will be outside assisting students who are looking for the correct class. Extra staff members will be deployed at the bus drop-off to assist students and walk them to their designated line-up location. Here are the locations for each grade level.

Kindergarten: 9:00 start at the primary playground.

1st Grade: Primary Playground

2nd Grade Interior courtyard

3rd Grade West Courtyard by the Gym

4th Grade West Courtyard by the Gym

On the third day of school, we will begin our regular arrival procedure. All students will line up inside the school. Students should go directly to these areas beginning at 8:15 a.m. and no later than 8:25 a.m.

Kindergarten: Door 20 (This is the kindergarten door to the right of the main entrance).

1st Grade: Door 19 (Located at the yellow zone of the drop off area)

Note: Kindergarten and first grade students who enter through the back door will walk through the school to their designated line up areas in the Kindergarten hallway and First Grade hallway.

2nd, 3rd, and 4th Grades: Students who enter through the front door will line up in the lobby. Students who enter through the back door will line up in the cafeteria. Students will be dismissed to their classrooms at 8:25 a.m.

Afternoon Dismissal 2:40 to 3:00: NO PARKING ON JEAN BURK DRIVE between 2-3 pm.

Parents have two options for pickup at the front of Brown School. You can either park and pick up or utilize the curbside pickup.

Curbside Pickup:

Curbside pickup is now available along Jean Burke Drive after school. All families will be issued a pickup sign for front door pickup. Signs will go home with students on the first day of school. Parents who are picking up on the first day of school will receive a sign as they pull up to the school. Please write your name on the sign in bold ink and display the it in the front right corner of your dashboard or the right fold down visor so you are easily identified by staff members.  When the dismissal bell rings, students will exit out of the building and proceed to the pick up area. Cars that are parked in the “Blue Zone” will be able to receive their child(ren). Once cars in the blue zone depart, a new line of cars will proceed into the blue zone.

If you elect to pick up your child using the curbside pickup, please remain in your vehicle at all times. Do not get out of your vehicle to assist. If your child is not ready when you enter the blue zone, you will be directed by a staff member to park your car in the parking lot to wait for your child. Staff members on duty can assist any child having difficulty entering the car.

If the curbside pickup line extends the entire length of Jean Burke Drive, please do not block the intersection by attempting to turn left. Instead, proceed to Kennedy, circle the island and turn right onto Jean Burke Drive. Parents who are choosing to park and pick-up may turn left to utilize the parking option.

Park and Pick Up:

You may park your car in the Brown or Kennedy parking lot to pick up your child. Our overflow parking lot is located by the gym of Kennedy located on the West side of the school by the other side of the primary playground. Parents who park and pick up should wait in the front area of the school. If you carpool with another family, please make sure the pickup signs for each family are displayed in your window.

Kindergarten Pick-Up: 2:50 pm

Parents who are only picking up kindergarteners should park in the parking lot and receive their child(ren) on the front sidewalk. Parents of kindergartners who are also picking up older siblings may park in the pickup line, receive their kindergartener at 2:40 and immediately return to his/her vehicle for the 2:45 dismissal bell.

Afternoon Dismissal 2:45

Early Dismissal

If your child’s dismissal plan needs to be changed in any way from the regular routine, the school must be notified in writing via the classroom teacher.  Feel free to call the school office if a dismissal change is needed due to unforeseen circumstances during the school day by 2:20 pm.  Also, please notify any after school programs that your child attends whenever there is a change in their after school dismissal.

School Announcements for Inclement Weather

During inclement weather, we must decide before 5:30 a.m. whether conditions will permit the opening of schools for the children.  This situation requires an understanding of and appreciation for the current and prospective weather conditions at that moment and the ability of the Department of Public Works to respond to these conditions within a relatively short period of time. Therefore, we plan to utilize the following procedure in the winter:

If the conditions are such that the DPW cannot handle the storm situation, we will cancel school sessions.  The "No School" announcement will be carried, starting at 6:00 a.m. by radio stations WBUR (FM 90.9), WBZ (AM 103.0), WRKO (AM 68.0), by television stations Channel 4, 5, 7, Fox 25, CW56 as well as a recorded message on the “School Closing Line” (508) 647-6515 (after 6:00 a.m.).   The following websites may also list school closings:

www.myfoxboston.com

www.thebostonchannel.com

www.schoolclosings.com

www.wbzclosing.com

If conditions are such that the DPW tells us that it needs extra time to plow the roads or sand the streets, we will shorten the school day.  Under this alternative plan, the opening of school and all bus pickups will be delayed two hours.  This simply means that the High School will open at 9:30 a.m.  The Wilson Middle School and the Kennedy Middle School will open at 9:50 a.m., and the elementary schools will open as follows:  Bennett-Hemenway 10:25 a.m., Brown 10:40 a.m., Johnson 10:40 a.m., Lilja 10:40 a.m., and Memorial 11:00 a.m.  The same radio and television stations will specifically announce:  “a Two-Hour Delayed Opening for All Public Schools in the Town of Natick”.

Two Hour Delay

On a two-hour delay day, schools will dismiss at their regular times.  The noon meal will be served at the regular times in the cafeterias of each building.

We remind parents not to attempt to send their children to school early on "Two-Hour Delay" days since the school yards may not be plowed nor will staff be available to supervise early arrivals.

TO SUMMARIZE:

A.        No School - All classes and school activities canceled for the day, including scheduled adult evening classes, recreation programs, etc.

B.        Two-Hour Delayed Opening - Morning bus pickups and the start of classes will be postponed by two hours.  However, meals, afternoon dismissals, and all other school activities will take place at their regularly scheduled times.  The pre-school a.m. session will be canceled on days of "Two-Hour Delayed Opening".  

Please do not telephone the Police Department, the Fire Department or the Department of Public Works to ask about "No School" or "Two-Hour Delayed Opening" announcements.  Each of the aforementioned must make and receive many important telephone calls of an emergency nature, and your telephone calls will only interfere with the performance of their duties at a critical time in the morning.  PLEASE LISTEN TO THE RADIO AND THE TELEVISION STATIONS LISTED ABOVE OR CALL THE SCHOOL CLOSING LINE for "No School" and "Two-Hour Delayed Opening" announcements.

Weather Emergencies

In the event of any severe weather situation, parents may, at their discretion, pick up their child even if school has not been officially dismissed.


Natick Public Schools                                                       

13 East Central Street

Natick, Massachusetts  01760

FAX (508) 647-6506                                Building the Future, One Child at a Time

Liam Hurley                                                                     Destiny Ashworth

Director of Fiscal and Management Services        Transportation Coordinator

(508) 647-6493                                                                      508-647-6497

BUS PASS POLICY

For safety reasons, as well as an emergency response tool, and to address possible overcrowding conditions, listed below is the Natick Public Schools Bus Pass Policy:

Morning Pickup –

Driver must allow student to board without a pass, but will encourage student to report to school office and call parent.  Driver provides Dispatch with a “no pass” report.  Dispatch will fax the report to Transportation Office at Central Administration, who will fax a copy of the “no pass” report to the student’s school.  The school office staff/will assist students in calling parent regarding bus pass replacement, and/or alternate afternoon transportation.  The Transportation Office will send a copy of the “no pass” report to the parent/guardian.

Afternoon Boarding –

Students are not allowed to board bus in afternoon without a bus pass.***  Driver should communicate to the student “You must report directly to the office and let them know you do not have a bus pass”.   School Office staff will assist student in calling for an alternate way home.

Driver will write a “no-pass” report and dispatch will fax report to Transportation Office.  Transportation Office will follow morning procedure.    

*** Bus passes are to be replaced as soon as possible, however, a 48-hour grace period will be allowed if parent is unable to get to Central Administration, due to the time and location of their work. Parent should call the Transportation Office to make arrangements for the student to have authorization to ride bus

Student Records

Student Record Regulations

The Student Record Regulations adopted by the Board of Education apply to all public elementary and secondary schools in Massachusetts.  (They also apply to private day and residential schools that have state approval to provide publicly-funded special education services.)  The regulations are designed to insure parents’ and students’ rights of confidentiality, inspection, amendment, and destruction of student records, and to assist school authorities in carrying out their responsibilities under state and federal law.

The regulations apply to all information kept by the school or school district on a student in a way that all students may be individually identified.  The regulations divide the record into two parts: the transcript and the temporary record.  The transcript includes only the minimum information necessary to reflect the student’s educational progress.  This information includes name, address, course titles, grades, credits, and grade level completed.  The transcript is kept by the school district for at least sixty years after the student leaves the system.

The temporary record contains the majority of the information maintained by the school about the student.  This may include such things as standardized test results; class rank; school-sponsored extracurricular activities; evaluations and comments by teachers, counselors, and other persons; disciplinary records; and other information.  The temporary record is destroyed within seven years after the student leaves the school system.

The Student Record Regulations are included in the Code of Massachusetts Regulations at 603 CMR 23.00.  For more detailed information, please review the regulations (copies of which should be available in every public school) and the Questions and Answers Guide published by the Massachusetts Department of Education in 1995.

AUTHORITY TO SCHOOL DISTRICTS TO TRANSFER RECORDS  TO OTHER PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEMS

School systems are now authorized to send student records directly to a public school to which a student seeks or intends to transfer, without the consent of the eligible student or parent, provided that the school the student is leaving gives notice, by letter to all parents, that it follows this practice. 23.07(4)(g)

BROWN SCHOOL DIRECTORY

The class lists provide a student address book of your child’s classmates, complete with the addresses and telephone numbers of parents/guardians.  It is an invaluable resource for planning play dates and birthday parties.  The Brown School Directory includes a listing of the teachers, staff and specialists at Brown School as well as telephone numbers of important contact names at the school, in the PTO, and for town-wide committees.  The Directory is distributed early in the school year.  To speed up the publication process your child(ren)’s details will be included in the directory unless you request us not to do so, in writing, by the end of the school year prior to publication.

Notification of Rights Under FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) and Massachusetts Student Records Regulations

 

Notification of Rights under FERPA

 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and Massachusetts Student Records Regulations affords parents and students over 14 years of age (“eligible students”) certain rights with respect to the student’s education records. These rights are:

 

(1) The right to inspect and review the student’s education records.  Access is generally provided within 10 days of the request.  State law sets forth specific procedures prior to the release of records to a non-custodial parent (M.G.L. c. 71, §34H).  

Parents or eligible students should submit to the School principal [or appropriate school official] a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The School principal will make arrangements for access and notify the parent or eligible student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.  Upon request, copies of any information contained in the student record will be furnished to the parent or eligible student, subject to a reasonable copying fee.

(2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the parent or eligible student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA or state law.

Parents or eligible students who wish to ask the School to amend a record should write the School principal [or appropriate school official], clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it should be amended. If the School decides not to amend the record as requested by the parent or eligible student, the School will notify the parent or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parent or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing.

 

(3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA and state law authorize disclosure without consent.

One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the School as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the School Board; a person or company with whom the School has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the School discloses education records without consent to officials of another school district in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

 

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the school district to comply with these legal requirements.

Complaints may be filed with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

(DESE), 75 Pleasant St., Malden, MA 02148 and/or the Family Policy Compliance

Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202-

5901.

FERPA Directory Information Notice

 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a Federal law, requires that Natick Public Schools, with certain exceptions, obtain your written consent prior to the disclosure of personally identifiable information from your child’s education records. However, the Natick Public Schools may disclose appropriately designated “directory information” without written consent, unless you have advised the District to the contrary in accordance with District procedures. The primary purpose of directory information is to allow the Natick Public Schools to include this type of information from your child’s education records in certain school publications. Examples include:

 

• A playbill, showing your student’s role in a drama production;
• The annual yearbook(4th grade);
• Honor roll or other recognition lists;

Directory information, which is information that is generally not considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if released, can also be disclosed to outside organizations without a parent’s prior written consent. Outside organizations include, but are not limited to, companies that manufacture class rings or publish yearbooks. In addition, two federal laws require local educational agencies (LEAs) receiving assistance under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) to provide military recruiters, upon request, with three directory information categories—names, addresses and telephone listings—unless parents have advised the LEA that they do not want their student’s information disclosed without their prior written consent.

If you do not want the Natick Public Schools to disclose directory information from your child’s education records without your prior written consent, you must notify your school principal in writing by September 15th of each calendar year or at the time of your enrollment. The Natick Public Schools have designated the following information as directory information:

 

• Student’s name
• Address
• Telephone listing
• Electronic mail address
• Photograph and video image
• Date and place of birth
• Grade level


Background Checks/Cori Policy

File:  ADDA

BACKGROUND CHECKS

 

It shall be the policy of the Natick Public Schools, as required by law, a state and national fingerprint criminal background check will be conducted to determine the suitability of full or part time current and prospective school employees, who may have direct and unmonitored contact with children. School employees shall include, but not be limited to any apprentice, intern, or student teacher or individuals in similar positions, who may have direct and unmonitored contact with children.  The School Committee shall only obtain a fingerprint background check for current and prospective employees for whom the School Committee has direct hiring authority. In the case of an individual directly hired by the School Committee, the chair of the School Committee shall review the results of the national criminal history check. The Superintendent, or his or her designee, shall also obtain a state and national fingerprint background check for any individual who regularly provides school related transportation to children. The School Committee, Superintendent or Principal, or their designees, as appropriate, may obtain a state and national fingerprint criminal background check for any volunteer, subcontractor or laborer commissioned by the School Committee, school or employed by the Town of Natick to perform work on school grounds, who may have direct and unmonitored contact with children. School volunteers and subcontractors/laborers who may have direct and unmonitored contact with children must continue to submit state CORI checks.

The fee charged by the provider to the employee and educator for national fingerprint background checks will be $55.00 for school employees subject to licensure by DESE and $35.00 for other employees, which fee may from time to time be adjusted by the appropriate agency.  The employer shall continue to obtain periodically, but not less than every 3 years, from the department of criminal justice information services all available Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) for any current and prospective employee or volunteer within the school district who may have direct and unmonitored contact with children.  

Direct and unmonitored contact with children is defined in DESE regulations as contact with a student when no other employee who has received a suitability determination by the school or district is present. “Contact” refers to any contact with a student that provides the individual with opportunity for physical touch or personal communication.

This policy is applicable to any fingerprint-based state and national criminal history record check made for non-criminal justice purposes and requested under applicable federal authority and/or state statute authorizing such checks for licensing or employment purposes. Where such checks are allowable by law, the following practices and procedures will be followed.

Requesting CHRI (Criminal History Record Information) checks

Fingerprint-based CHRI checks will only be conducted as authorized by state and federal law, in accordance with all applicable state and federal rules and regulations. If an applicant or employee is required to submit to a fingerprint-based state and national criminal history record check, he/she shall be informed of this requirement and instructed on how to comply with the law. Such instruction will include information on the procedure for submitting fingerprints. In addition, the applicant or employee will be provided with all information needed to successfully register for a fingerprinting appointment.

Access to CHRI

All CHRI is subject to strict state and federal rules and regulations in addition to Massachusetts CORI laws and regulations. Those authorized to have access to or view CHRI shall be the same as those authorized to access or view CORI, as described in policy ADDA-R. CHRI cannot be shared with any unauthorized entity for any purpose, including subsequent hiring determinations. All receiving entities are subject to audit by the Massachusetts Department of Criminal Justice Information Services (DCJIS) and the FBI, and failure to comply with such rules and regulations could lead to sanctions. Federal law and regulations provide that the exchange of records and information is subject to cancellation if dissemination is made outside of the receiving entity or related entities. Furthermore, an entity can be charged criminally for the unauthorized disclosure of CHRI.

Storage of CHRI

CHRI shall only be stored for extended periods of time when needed for the integrity and/or utility of an individual's personnel file. Administrative, technical, and physical safeguards, which are in compliance with the most recent CJIS Security Policy have been implemented to ensure the security and confidentiality of CHRI. Each individual involved in the handling of CHRI is to familiarize himself/herself with these safeguards.

In addition to the above, each individual involved in the handling of CHRI will strictly adhere to the policy on the storage, retention and destruction of CHRI.

Retention and Destruction of CHRI

Federal law prohibits the repurposing or dissemination of CHRI beyond its initial requested purpose. Once an individual's CHRI is received, it will be securely retained in internal agency documents for the following purposes only:

Historical reference and/or comparison with future CHRI requests,

Dispute of the accuracy of the record

Evidence for any subsequent proceedings based on information contained in the CHRI.

CHRI will be kept for the above purposes in a secure location in the office of the superintendent.  When no longer needed, CHRI and any summary of CHRI data must be destroyed by shredding paper copies and/or by deleting all electronic copies from the electronic storage location, including any backup copies or files. The shredding of paper copies of CHRI by an outside vendor must be supervised by an employee of the district.

CHRI Training

An informed review of a criminal record requires training. Accordingly, all personnel authorized to receive and/or review CHRI at the district will review and become familiar with the educational and relevant training materials regarding SAFIS and CHRI laws and regulations made available by the appropriate agencies, including the DCJIS.

Determining Suitability

In determining an individual's suitability, the following factors will be considered: these factors may include, but not necessarily be limited to: the nature and gravity of the crime and the underlying conduct, the time that has passed since the offense, conviction and/or completion of the sentence, nature of the position held or sought, age of the individual at the time of the offense, number of offenses, any relevant evidence of rehabilitation or lack thereof and any other factors deemed relevant by the district.

 

A record of the suitability determination will be retained. The following information will be included in the determination:

The name and date of birth of the employee or applicant;

The date on which the school employer received the national criminal history check results; and, The suitability determination (either "suitable" or "unsuitable").

A copy of an individual's suitability determination documentation must be provided to another school employer, or to the individual, upon request of the individual for whom the school employer conducted a suitability determination.

Relying on Previous Suitability Determination.

The school employer may obtain and may rely on a favorable suitability determination from a prior employer, if the following criteria are met:

The suitability determination was made within the last seven years; and

The individual has not resided outside of Massachusetts for any period longer than three years since the suitability determination was made; and either

The individual has been employed continuously for one or more school employers or has gaps totaling no more than two years in his or her employment for school employers; or

If the individual works as a substitute employee, the individual is still deemed suitable for employment by the school employer who made a favorable suitability determination. Upon request of another school employer, the initial school employer shall provide documentation that the individual is still deemed suitable for employment by the initial school employer.

Adverse Decisions Based on CHRI

If inclined to make an adverse decision based on an individual's CHRI, the district will take the following steps prior to making a final adverse determination:

Provide the individual with a copy of his/her CHRI used in making the adverse decision;

Provide the individual with a copy of this CHRI Policy;

Provide the individual the opportunity to complete or challenge the accuracy of his/her CHRI;  and

Provide the individual with information on the process for updating, changing, or correcting CHRI.

A final adverse decision based on an individual's CHRI will not be made until the individual has been afforded a reasonable time depending on the particular circumstances not to exceed thirty days to correct or complete the CHRI.

Secondary Dissemination of CHRI

If an individual's CHRI is released to another authorized entity, a record of that dissemination must be made in the secondary dissemination log. The secondary dissemination log is subject to audit by the DCJIS and the FBI.

The following information will be recorded in the log:

Subject Name;

Subject Date of Birth;

Date and Time of the dissemination;

Name of the individual to whom the information was provided;

Name of the agency for which the requestor works; Contact information for the requestor; and

The specific reason for the request.

Reporting to Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education

Pursuant to state law and regulation, if the district dismisses, declines to renew the employment of, obtains the resignation of, or declines to hire a licensed educator or an applicant for a Massachusetts educator license because of information discovered through a state or national criminal record check, the district shall report such decision or action to the Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education in writing within 30 days of the employer action or educator resignation. The report shall be in a form requested by the Department and shall include the reason for the action or resignation as well as a copy of the criminal record checks results. The Superintendent or his or her designee shall notify the employee or applicant that it has made a report pursuant to the regulations to the Commissioner.

Pursuant to state law and regulation, if the district discovers information from a state or national criminal record check about a licensed educator or an applicant for a Massachusetts educator license that implicates grounds for license action pursuant to regulations, the Superintendent or his or her designee shall report to the Commissioner in writing within 30 days of the discovery, regardless of whether the district retains or hires the educator as an employee. The report must include a copy of the criminal record check results. The school employer shall notify the employee or applicant that it has made a report pursuant to regulations to the Commissioner and shall also send a copy of the criminal record check results to the employee or applicant.

C.O.R.I. REQUIREMENTS

It shall be the policy of the district to obtain all available Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) from the department of criminal justice information services of on prospective employee(s) or volunteer(s) of the school department including any individual who regularly provides school related transportation to children, who may have direct and unmonitored contact with children, prior to hiring the employee(s) or to accepting any person as a volunteer. State law requires that school districts obtain CORI data for employees of taxicab companies that have contracted with the schools to provide transportation to pupils.

The Superintendent, Principal, or their certified designees shall periodically, but not less than every three years, obtain all available Criminal Offender Record Information from the department of criminal justice informational services on all employees, individuals who regularly provide school related transportation to children, including taxicab company employees, and volunteers who may have direct and unmonitored contact with children, during their term of employment or volunteer service.

The Superintendent, Principal, or their certified designees may also have access to Criminal Offender Record Information for any subcontractor or laborer who performs work on school grounds, and who may have direct and unmonitored contact with children, and shall notify them of this requirement and comply with the appropriate provisions of this policy.

Pursuant to a Department of Education regulation, “‘Direct and unmonitored contact with children’ means contact with students when no other employee, for whom the employer has made a suitability determination of the school or district, is present. “ Contact” refers to any contact with a student that provides the individual with opportunity for physical touch or personal communication. The school employer may determine when there is potential for direct and unmonitored contact with children by assessing the circumstances and specific factors including but not limited to, whether the individual will be working in proximity with students, the amount of time the individual will spend on school grounds, and whether the individual will be working independently or with others. An individual shall not be considered to have the potential for direct and unmonitored contact with children if he or she has only the potential for incidental unsupervised contact in commonly used areas of the school grounds.”

In accordance with state law, all current and prospective employees, volunteers, and persons regularly providing school related transportation to children of the school district shall sign an acknowledgement form authorizing receipt by the district of all available CORI data from the department of criminal justice information services. In the event that a current employee has a question concerning the signing of the acknowledgement form, he/she may meet with the Principal or Superintendent, or their designees; however, failure to sign the CORI acknowledgement form may result in a referral to local counsel for appropriate action. Completed acknowledgement forms must be kept in secure files. The School Committee, Superintendent, Principals or their designees certified to obtain information under the policy shall prohibit the dissemination of school information for any purpose other than to further the protection of school children.

CORI is not subject to the public records law and must be kept in a secure location, separate from personnel files and may be retained for not more than three years. CORI shall be shared with the individual to whom it pertains, pursuant to law, regulation and the following model policy, and in the event of an inaccurate report the individual should contact the department of criminal justice informational services.  

Access to CORI material must be restricted to those individuals certified to receive such information. In the case of prospective employees or volunteers, CORI material should be obtained only where the Superintendent or his or her designee had determined that the applicant is qualified and may forthwith be recommended for employment or volunteer duties.

The hiring authority, subject to applicable law and the model policy, reserves the exclusive right concerning any employment decision.  

The Superintendent or his or her designee shall ensure that on the application for employment and/or volunteer form there shall be a statement that as a condition of the employment or volunteer service the school district is required by law to obtain Criminal Offender Record Information for any employee, individual who regularly provides transportation, or volunteer who may have direct and unmonitored contact with children. Current employees, persons regularly providing school related transportation, and volunteers shall also be informed in writing by the Superintendent or his or her designee prior to the periodic obtaining of their Criminal Offender Record Information.

The Superintendent or his or her designee shall amend employment applications to include questions concerning criminal records which the Massachusetts Commission against Discrimination has determined may be legally asked of prospective employees. Any employment application which seeks information concerning prior arrests or convictions of the applicant shall include the following statement: “An applicant for employment with a sealed record on file with the commission of probation may answer ‘no record’ with respect to an inquiry herein relative to prior arrests or criminal court appearances. In addition, any applicant for employment may answer ‘no record’ with respect to any inquiry relative to prior arrests, court appearances and adjudications in all cases of delinquency or as a child in need of service which did not result in a complaint transferred to the superior court for criminal prosecution.”

Records sealed pursuant to law shall not operate to disqualify a person in any examination, appointment or application for public service on behalf of the Commonwealth or any political subdivision thereof.

The Superintendent or his or her designee shall revise contracts with special education schools and other providers to require a signed statement that the provider has met all legal requirements of the state where it is located relative to criminal background checks for employees and others having direct and unmonitored contact with children.

 

LEGAL REFS.:         M.G.L.6:167-178; 15D:7-8; 71:38R, 151B, 276:100A

        P.L. 92-544; Title 28 U.S.C. § 534; Title 28 C.F.R. 20.33(b)

        42 U.S.C. § 16962

        603 CMR 51.00

        803 CMR 2.00

        803 CMR 3.05 (Chapter 149 of the Acts of 2004)

FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Security Policy

        Procedure for correcting a criminal record

        FAQ – Background Checks

SOURCE:  MASC May 2014  

 

NOTE: The Department of Criminal Justice Information Services (DCJIS) has adopted regulations requiring that it maintain a model CORI policy and that any written policy must meet the minimum standards as found in the model. Therefore, MASC recommends that school districts retain both the school district specific policy incorporated here and the DCJIS model policy attached as ADDA-R.

Approved by the Natick School Committee – September 22, 2014

                     

File:  ADDA-R

DCJIS MODEL CORI POLICY

 

This policy is applicable to the criminal history screening of prospective and current employees, subcontractors, volunteers and interns, and professional licensing applicants.

Where Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) and other criminal history checks may be part of a general background check for employment, volunteer work, licensing purposes, the following practices and procedures will be followed.

CONDUCTING CORI SCREENING

CORI checks will only be conducted as authorized by the DCJIS, state law, and regulation, and only after a CORI Acknowledgement Form has been completed.

If a new CORI check is to be made on a subject within a year of his/her signing of the CORI Acknowledgement Form, the subject shall be given seventy two (72) hours notice that a new CORI check will be conducted.

ACCESS TO CORI

All CORI obtained from the DCJIS is confidential, and access to the information must be limited to those individuals who have a "need to know". This may include, but not be limited to, hiring managers, staff submitting the CORI requests, and staff charged with processing job applications.  The district must maintain and keep a current list of each individual authorized to have access to, or view, CORI. This list must be updated every six (6) months and is subject to inspection upon request by the DCJIS at any time.

CORI TRAINING

An informed review of a criminal record requires training. Accordingly. All district personnel authorized to review or access CORI will review, and will be thoroughly familiar with, the educational and relevant training materials regarding CORI laws and regulations made available by the DCJIS.

USE OF CRIMINAL HISTORY IN BACKGROUND SCREENING

CORI used for employment purposes shall only be accessed for applicants who are otherwise qualified for the position for which they have applied.

Unless otherwise provided by law, a criminal record will not automatically disqualify an applicant. Rather, determinations of suitability based on background checks will be made consistent with this policy and any applicable law or regulations.

VERIFYING A SUBJECT'S IDENTITY

If a criminal record is received from the DCJIS, the information is to be closely compared with the information on the CORI Acknowledgement Form and any other identifying information provided by the applicant to ensure the record belongs to the applicant.

 

File:  ADDA-R

If the information in the CORI record provided does not exactly match the identification information provided by the applicant, a determination is to be made by an individual authorized to make such determinations based on a comparison of the CORI record and documents provided by the applicant.

INQUIRING ABOUT CRIMINAL HISTORY

In connection with any decision regarding employment, volunteer opportunities, or professional licensing, the subject shall be provided with a copy of the criminal history record, whether obtained from the DCJIS or from any other source, prior to questioning the subject about his or her criminal history.  The source(s) of the criminal history record is also to be disclosed to the subject.

DETERMINING SUITABILITY

If a determination is made, based on the verification of identity information as provided in this policy, that the criminal record belongs to the subject, and the subject does not dispute the record's accuracy, then the determination of suitability for the position or license will be made.  Unless otherwise provided by law, factors considered in determining suitability may include, but not be limited to, the following:

  1. Relevance of the record to the position sought;  
  2. The nature of the work to be performed;
  3. Time since the conviction;
  4. Age of the candidate at the time of the offense;
  5. Seriousness and specific circumstances of the offense;  
  6. The number of offenses;
  7. Whether the applicant has pending charges;
  8. Any relevant evidence of rehabilitation or lack thereof; and
  9. Any other relevant information, including information submitted by the candidate or requested by the organization.

The applicant is to be notified of the decision and the basis for it in a timely manner.

ADVERSE DECISIONS BASED ON CORI

If an authorized official is inclined to make an adverse decision based on the results of a criminal history background check, the applicant will be notified immediately. The subject shall be provided with a copy of the organization's CORI policy and a copy of the criminal history. The source(s) of the criminal history will also be revealed.  The subject will then be provided with an opportunity to dispute the accuracy of the CORI record.  Subjects shall also be provided a copy of DCJIS' Information Concerning the Process for Correcting a Criminal Record.

SECONDARY DISSEMINATION LOGS

All CORI obtained from the DCJIS is confidential and can only be disseminated as authorized by law and regulation.  A central secondary dissemination log shall be used to record any dissemination of CORI outside this organization, including dissemination at the request of the subject.  

Approved by the Natick School Committee – September 22, 2014

Natick Residency Policy

 

NATICK PUBLIC SCHOOLS

RESIDENCY POLICY

1.        Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to provide guidance to school administrators, parents, and/or legal guardians concerning the admission of students to the Natick Public Schools (the "Schools"). The Schools were established pursuant to statutes providing publicly funded education for students within The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the right to attend the schools is also regulated by statute. Generally and as more fully set forth in this policy, the right to attend the schools is limited to students who reside in the Town of Natick and to certain nonresident students who are eligible to attend the schools under specific programs or conditions approved by the Natick School Committee.

2.        Eligibility to Attend the Schools

A student between the minimum and maximum ages established by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education who has not received a diploma or certificate from a secondary school shall be eligible to attend the schools if:

 

a.        Kindergarten student is 5 years of age on or before August 31st of the enrollment year. Grade 1 student is 6 years of age on or before August 31st of the enrollment year. Exceptions to age requirement will be considered in accordance with Natick Public Schools early admission protocol (See Appendix A).

 

b.        The student permanently, not temporarily or sporadically, resides in Natick with

his/her parent(s) or legal guardian.

 

c.        The student actually resides in Natick with someone other than his/her parent(s) or

legal guardian for the purpose of attending the schools and tuition for such student is paid as in accordance with Section 6 of this policy.

 

d.        The student actually resides in Natick with someone other than his/her parent(s) or legal guardian for the purpose of temporarily ameliorating personal extreme hardship, and may attend the schools at the discretion of the Superintendent.

 

e.        The student, regardless of place of residence, has been selected to attend the schools under a statutory program for the education of non-resident students, duly accepted by the School Committee.

 

f.        The student is from a foreign country and meets the requirements of Section 7 of this policy.

 

g.        The student, regardless of place of residence, meets the requirements of Section 9 of this policy.

 

h.        Prior to entry, the student must meet all MA Department of Public Health immunization

requirements in accordance with 105 CMR 220.

 

 

3.        Verification of Residency

Before any student is enrolled in Natick Public Schools, his or her parent or legal guardian must provide:

a.        A signed Statement/Affidavit of Occupancy (see below)

b.        Proof of Residency in Natick (3 documents).

All applicants for enrollment must submit at least one document each from Column A, B, and C and any other documents that may be requested, including but not limited to those from Column A, B, or C (noted below). A parent, guardian, or student who is unable to produce the required documents should contact the Superintendent.

 

COLUMN A-­Evidence of Residency

COLUMN B-­Evidence of Occupancy

COLUMN C -­Photo Identification

Record of recent mortgage payment and/or property tax bil

Gas/Oil Bill, Electric Bill, Home (not cell) Telephone Bill, Cable Bill, Water Bill (Note: Bill must be dated within the past 45 days and address and name must be stated)

Valid MA Driver’s License

Fully signed and executed Lease and/or Rental Agreement with the names of the children listed on the document.

(Must be executed by both parties)

Recent bill dated within the past 45 days showing Natick address and name (Note: A Residency Statement/Affidavit is required with this option)

Valid MA Photo ID Card

Residency Affidavit

Excise Tax bill

Valid Passport

Fully signed and executed Purchase and Sale (P&S) Agreement (provided occupancy date occurs within 45 days of enrollment)

 

Other Government issued Photo ID

Section 8 Agreement

 

 

 

4. Determination of Eligibility

The Superintendent, or his/her designee(s), shall determine whether a student is eligible to attend the Schools. In determining whether a student actually resides in Natick for purposes of Sections 2.b, 2.c and 2.d of this policy, the following factors shall be considered:

 

a.        Whether the student physically occupies a dwelling in Natick regardless of whether such occupancy is based upon ownership, lease, or consent of a person legally entitled to occupy the dwelling;

b.        With whom the student lives, such as parent(s), legal guardian, custodial parent after a divorce, relative, or other person and the duration of such living arrangement;

c.        If a student resides with someone other than his/her parent(s), legal guardian, or the parent with physical custody after a divorce, the reasons for doing so;

d.        The amount of time actually spent by the student in the dwelling in Natick;

e.        Whether the student's physical belongings are stored at the dwelling;

f.        Whether mail concerning the student, such as mail from doctors, etc., is addressed to the dwelling;

g.        Whether the residence is the center of the student’s domestic, social, and civic life;

h.        Whether the student was included as an occupant of the dwelling for purposes of the town census;

i.          Such other information as the Superintendent or his/her designee(s) may deem relevant to determining where a student actually resides.

 

5. Post-Enrollment Verification And Enforcement

Should a question arise concerning any student’s residency in the Town of Natick while s/he is attending the Natick Public Schools, the student’s residency will be subject to further inquiry and/or investigation.  Questions concerning residency may arise on the basis of incomplete, suspicious, or contradictory proofs of address; anonymous tips; correspondence that is returned to Natick Public Schools because of an invalid or unknown address; statements made by students that they are moving or have moved, or other grounds.  When he/she becomes aware of a question regarding a student’s residency, the building principal or other member of the Administration (or his/her designee) shall contact the Superintendent.  The principal may request updated proof of residence, and may obtain the services of the Natick Police Department to conduct an investigation into student’s residence.

 

The Natick Police Department may use, but is not limited to, the following methods to conduct his/her investigation:

·      Investigator will visit the residence without an advanced notice

·      Investigator may attempt to contact/interview parent to gather documentation to either confirm residency or prove non-residency

·      Investigator may interview landlord and neighbors when possible

·      Investigator may keep residence under surveillance to establish patterns of occupancy

·      Investigator will leave evidence of his/her visit by leaving a dated letter and business card with contact information

·      The investigation will continue until residency or non-residency is confirmed and supported with appropriate documentation

The residency investigator will report his or her findings to the Principal/Superintendent.

 

6.  Payment of Tuition for Certain Students

It is the intention of this policy to require the payment of tuition in advance for all students legally required to pay tuition to attend the schools. Nothing in this policy shall be construed as acceptance by the Town of Natick of any financial obligations for the education of students who temporarily reside in Town for the purposes of obtaining an education.

a.        A student who resides temporarily in Natick with someone other than his/her parent(s)

or legal guardian for the purpose of attending the Schools shall only be admitted to the Schools upon the payment of tuition by (i) the town in which the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian resides(s), or (ii) by the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian, as provided in M.G. L. Ch. 76, Sec. 6. Tuition payable by the parent or guardian shall, for the period of attendance, be computed at the average expense per pupil in such school for such period.

b.        Any student for whom tuition is payable shall only be admitted to the Schools for the

period of time actually covered by a tuition payment and shall be required to withdraw from the Schools if future tuition payments are not received by the Schools in a timely fashion as determined by the Superintendent.

c.        The education of students with disabilities is the financial responsibility of the city or

town in which the student resides. The programmatic and fiscal obligations for “tuition” students, who require special education services, is addressed in 603CMR 28.03 (4)

 

 

 

7. School Choice

Natick has voted to be a Massachusetts School Choice District.  Determination on allowing students to attend the Natick Public Schools under School Choice is determined on an annual basis.  Factors determining that decision are:

a.    The availability of seats/space in the school/grade requested;

b.    The class sizes at the grade levels of enrollment;

c.    That enrollment of the student will not have an adverse impact on the schools’ budget;

d.    The effect on the student of enrollment, if it is to be at a time other than the beginning of a school year; and

e.    Whether an appropriate educational program and current school resources for the student exist in the schools, provided that the education of students with disabilities remains the financial responsibility of the city or town in which the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian resides.

 

7A.METCO

Natick Public Schools adheres to the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 76, section 12A (METCO) in enrolling non-resident students under the METCO program.

 

8.  Foreign Students

In order to provide students at Natick High School with the opportunity to meet students from foreign cultures and to be educated abroad, the School Committee supports the enrollment of foreign students in the Schools as provided for in this section.

a.        The Principal of Natick High School may enroll foreign students annually, subject to the approval of the Superintendent.

b.        A foreign student who wishes to reside in Natick for the purpose of attending the Schools shall be subject to the provisions of Section 6 and shall be required to pay tuition as provided therein, unless the Superintendent, if permitted by federal law, specifically waives payment of tuition.

 

9.  Admission of Non-Resident Students

Except as expressly provided for herein, non-resident students shall not be admitted to the Schools. In addition to non-resident students who are eligible to attend the Schools under Sections 2.e, and 2.g above, the Superintendent may, in accordance with state and federal laws and regulations, permit a non-resident student to attend the schools as follows:

a.        A student who was legally enrolled in the Schools under Sections 2.b and 2.c and

whose family moves out of Town on or after April 1 of a school year may, with the permission of the Superintendent, continue to attend the schools for the remainder of the year (see Section 10).

b.        Continued enrollment for grade 12 of a student who has completed grade 11 in

accordance with Section 9.a is subject to application to and approval by the Superintendent

c.         A student whose family provides satisfactory evidence that he/she will be residing

in Natick within a grading period and would be eligible to attend the schools under Sections 2.a, 2.b or 2.c of this policy may, in accordance with regulations adopted by the Superintendent, and with the permission of the Superintendent, attend the Schools prior to actually residing in Natick.

d.        The Superintendent may permit a non-resident student to attend the High School

for not more than one year under a reciprocal arrangement with the Schools in the Town in which the student resides pursuant to M.G.L. Ch. 76, Sec 12, where such temporary attendance is (i) in the best educational interests of the student, (ii) there is no reason to believe that the student presents any risk to other students or employees of the Schools.

 

 

 

 

 

10. Superintendent's Permission

The Superintendent may permit a non-resident student to attend the Schools under Sections 9.a, 9.b, and 9.c of this policy if:

a.        The school district in which the student's parent(s) or legal guardian reside(s) requests that the student attend the Schools; and

b.        There is space available for the student; and

c.         Attendance by the student would not impose an undue burden on the Schools'

budget; and

d.        The student has a good disciplinary record and an acceptable custodial

arrangement; and

e.         Refusal of the request would, in the judgment of the Superintendent, likely harm the

student's education.

11. Transportation of Non-­Residents

Except as otherwise provided in state and federal laws and other policies, transportation of a non-resident student to and from school shall remain the responsibility of his/her parent(s) or legal guardian.

 

12.         Students with Disabilities

The education of students with disabilities is the financial responsibility of the city or town in which the student resides. The programmatic and fiscal obligations for students, who require special education services, is addressed in 603CMR 28.03 (4)

 

13.     Good Behavior

Non-resident students attending the Schools under Sections 2.e, 2.f, 2.g, or 2.h do so subject to the terms and conditions established by those programs and any School Committee policies and regulations therefore, and their continued eligibility to attend the Schools is conditional upon such students' good behavior. Such students' eligibility to attend the Schools may be terminated as provided for by those programs or for bad conduct pursuant to the Schools’ Code of Conduct.

14.     Regulations

The Superintendent shall adopt written regulations from time to time implementing this policy and requiring students, their parent(s), legal guardians, or persons having custody of a student to supply such information as may be reasonably necessary to make determinations about a student's eligibility to attend the Schools, whether tuition may be charged for such student, or for any other purpose relating to the implementation of this policy.

 

15.     Failure to provide information or to pay tuition

Failure by a student and/or parent/guardian to provide evidence or explanations as requested by the school administration to implement this policy and failure to promptly pay any tuition due shall result in the student being ineligible to attend the Schools.

 

16.     Waiver of Tuition

Upon recommendation by the Superintendent, the Committee may, in its discretion, waive payment of tuition.

 

 

 

 

17. Penalty

Only students who qualify under this policy shall be eligible to attend the schools. Any person who knowingly misrepresents facts concerning a student's actual place of residence or reasons for residing in Natick, or any other material facts concerning a student's eligibility to attend the schools under this policy in order to enroll a student in the schools or to avoid paying tuition may be liable for the consequences. Natick Public Schools reserves the right to recover restitution based upon the costs of educational services provided during the period of non-­residency.

 

18.     Relationship to Federal and Massachusetts Laws and Regulations

It is the intent of the foregoing policy that the Natick Public Schools shall also be in compliance with all Federal and State laws and regulations bearing upon enrollment issues, including but not limited to:

·          The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, as amended [42 U.S.C. 725] by the No Child Left Behind Act Federal Immigration Law Regarding Foreign Students [8 U.S.C. 1184 (L) (3)]

·          Massachusetts Special Education Regulations [603 CMR 28.03 (4)].

·          Caregiver Authorization Affidavit (MGL Chapter 511 of the Acts of 2008 as amended by Chapter 20 1F)

·          Massachusetts Department of Public Health Regulations (105 CMR 220)

 

 

Adopted by the Natick School Committee – January 5, 2015

APPENDIX A

 

 

 

File:  JEB

 

ENTRANCE AGE

 

In an attempt to permit children to enter kindergarten and first grade at the time most appropriate for them individually, the School Committee establishes the following policy on entrance age:

 

Kindergarten:  For admission, a child must be five years of age on or before August 31 of the year in which s/he may enter kindergarten in September.

 

First Grade:  For admission, a child must be six years of age on or before August 31 of the year in which s/he may enter first grade in September.

 

Transfer Students:

 

Into Kindergarten:  A child transferring from another public school kindergarten whose entrance age requirement is lower than that in Natick should have had regular experience in a kindergarten (either half-day or full-day) for at least one-half year, and may be registered not earlier than the first school day in February. In addition, a statement shall be required from the previous school attended that the child is capable of doing kindergarten work, and has been in attendance for at least 75% of the scheduled school days. The Principal will then follow the Students Seeking an Age Exemption procedure to determine if the underage child may enter the Natick Public Schools.

 

Completed Kindergarten into First Grade:  A child who has completed kindergarten in another school, whose age requirement is lower than the entrance age for Natick, and who wishes to enter first grade may be admitted provided that the child is capable of doing first grade work and has been in attendance for at least of 75% of the scheduled school days during the kindergarten year. A statement to that effect will be required from the previous school. The Principal will then follow the Students Seeking an Age Exemption procedure to determine if the underage child may enter the first grade in the Natick Public Schools or if the child should attend the full-day kindergarten in Natick.

 

Into First Grade:  A child transferring from another school whose entrance age is lower than that in Natick should have had regular experience in first grade at least until the Thanksgiving recess and may be registered for entrance into first grade not earlier than the first day of school after the above-mentioned recess. In addition, a statement shall be required from the previous school attended that the child is capable of doing first grade work, and has been in attendance a minimum of 75% of the school year, thus far. The Principal will then follow the Students Seeking an Age Exemption procedure to determine if the underage child may enter the first grade in the Natick Public Schools or if the child should attend the full-day kindergarten in Natick.

 

 

Students Seeking an Age Exemption:

 

Parent(s) wishing to seek an exemption for an underage child should use the following procedure:

 

1.            Parent(s) and child will meet with the Principal of the child's local school. The Principal will consider all four areas of the child's development:  cognitive; physical; social; and emotional. The Principal will determine if the request is warrants consideration.

 

2.            The parent(s) will meet with a school-based assessment team to discuss the merits of early entry. (The team may consist of a teacher, the special education chairperson, the guidance counselor, and any other staff member that the Principal feels appropriate.)

 

3.            The child will visit a kindergarten (or first grade) classroom so that the team can make first-hand observations about the child's potential for success.

 

4.            The team will make a recommendation to the Principal based upon the observations of the members.

 

5.            In the event that the parent(s) does not agree with the recommendations of the team, the parent(s) may meet with the Superintendent and/or the Assistant Superintendent of Teaching Learning & Innovation.

 

Parents should understand that early entry is based only on the most extenuating circumstances will be considered.

 

 

 

LEGAL REFS.: M.G.L 15:1G

Board of Education Regulations for Entrance to First Grade and Kindergarten, adopted 7/20/71

 

NATICK PUBLIC SCHOOLS

RESIDENCY AFFIDAVIT

LANDLORD/SHARED TENANCIES

Instructions:  Any applicant for the Natick Public Schools who cannot produce a property deed or lease must ask the owner or lessee of the property where the applicant lives to complete and sign this legal affidavit.

 

It is the responsibility of the applicant (not the person who completes this affidavit) to attach a record of recent rent payment unless this affidavit affirms in Item #3 below that the tenancy does not require payment of rent.

AFFIDAVIT

 

My name is _____________________________________and I hereby depose and certify as follows: (Please complete all three items and sign below.)

 

1.   I am the owner/lessee of property located at

 

_______________________________________________________in the town of Natick.

 

2.   (Parent or guardian name)____________________________________________________,

 

who is the parent or legal guardian of (child’s name)_______________________________,

leases or subleases this property as their principal residence from me, without a written lease, in a tenancy at will, from month to month.

 

3.   PLEASE CHECK ONE:

ÌI have received within the last thirty (30) days rental payment for the lease or sublease of these premises.

OR:

ÌAlternatively, I hereby state that the party named above resides with me at the address above with no payment of rent.

 

Signed under the pains and penalties of perjury this _______day of_____________20____.

 

 

_______________________________________________________

Signature

 

Print Name:_________________________________________________________________

 

Print Address:_______________________________________________________________

 

Phone:_____________________________________________________________________

 

The information contained in this legal affidavit is subject to verification by a residency investigator.


Health Services and Guidelines

Please refer to the Health Department section at http://natickps.org/Departments/health/main.cfm  for up-to-date health information, policies, and health forms.

Health Services are responsible for treating students having illness or injuries occurring during school hours.  Each school maintains a Health Clinic and is staffed with a School Nurse.
 
Health Information/Emergency Form:

In order to understand and safeguard your child's health, we ask each parent to complete an emergency form at the beginning of the school year. While this form is sent home annually, we ask that you update this form during the school year as needed. It is incumbent upon parents/guardians to keep the School Nurse apprised of relevant health information.
 
Immunizations:

Upon enrollment into kindergarten, parents/guardians are required to present a physician’s certificate or a certificate from the Board of Health attesting to students’ immunizations against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, and Hemophilus influenza type B, and such other communicable diseases as specified by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Per state law, students will be excluded from school if immunizations are not up to date.
 
Vision and Hearing Screenings:

Students’ vision and hearing are tested yearly. Parents/guardians will be notified if any concerns are detected. These are merely screening tests and should be accompanied by periodic exams by your doctor.

Height and Weight/BMI Screening:

Schools in Massachusetts are now mandated by Massachusetts General Laws to obtain heights and weights on students in grades 1, 4, 7 and 10.  After obtaining your child's height and weight, your child's BMI (Body Mass Index) will be calculated and you will be notified of the results in a confidential manner.

Healthy Habits:

Good health habits should be developed early in life.  It takes a healthy child to be educated. You may assist you child in developing good health habits by teaching and encouraging him/her to:

1. Eat adequate and well-balanced meals, especially breakfast.
2. Brush teeth twice a day.
3. Cleanliness is important and expected.
4. Perform toilet habits independently.
5. Make sure child has his/her eyeglasses at school at all times.
6. Cover nose and mouth with tissue or inside of elbow when coughing or sneezing.
7. Wash hands after using toilet and before eating snacks and meals.
8. Go to bed regularly at an early hour to get adequate rest.

Absences:

Although regular school attendance is desirable, a sick child should never be sent to school. Students should not come to school if they are ill and should be fever-free for 24 hours before returning to school.

Reasons for keeping a child at home:
1.     Temperature over 99.6 degrees
2.     Colds, coughs and runny nose
3.     Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
4.     Undiagnosed rashes
5.     Impetigo
6.     Conjunctivitis (pink eye)
7.     Pediculosis (head lice)
8.     Scabies
9.     Ringworm

Pupils returning to school after an absence of more than five (5) days should present evidence for absence (a physician's note).

Medication Policy:

Only a physician is legally authorized to prescribe medication, this includes over the counter medication. If at all possible medication should be given at home before or after school hours. A student who needs to take any medication during school hours must have a signed permission slip from parent/guardian and the physician.  Medication (in a pharmacy labeled bottle) is kept locked in the clinic and taken under the supervision of the nurse. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) may be given at the discretion of the school nurse, if the parent/guardian has signed the permission form.

CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED TO TRANSPORT ANY MEDICATION, INCLUDING OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICINES.  The only exception:  students at NHS and the middle schools are allowed to carry their own epi-pen and/or inhaler (with written permission from their physician on file in the clinic.)

Infectious Disease Regulations:
Chicken Pox should be reported to the Board of Health either by the physician or parent.  Pupil's release certificate, issued by the Board of Health or the physician, must be presented to the school nurse before the student is readmitted.  The period of isolation for Chicken Pox is at least 7 days from appearance of the most recent eruptions as long as all lesions are crusted and dry.

It is not necessary to report the following to the Board of Health, BUT the period of isolation must be followed:

DISEASE/PERIOD OF ISOLATION

1.  Streptococcal infections - 24 hours after treatment with appropriate antibiotic
.

2.  Impetigo - 24 hours after initiation of treatment with appropriate antibiotic topical or oral medication.
3.  Conjunctivitis (pink eye) - 24 hours after initiation of treatment with appropriate ointment or drops
.
4.  Ringworm - 24 hours after initiation of treatment with appropriate topical medication
.
5.  Scabies - 24 hours after initiation of treatment with appropriate topical medication
.
6.  Pediculosis (head lice) -  Until seen by the nurse and free of nits/eggs

Natick Public Schools Medication Procedure

There are two forms, “Physicians Authorization for Dispensing Medication” and the parent “Authorization for Dispensing Medications” that must be completed prior to a student receiving medications in school.  Both forms can be downloaded from the NPS web site health section and/or are available in the health clinics.

The parent/guardian is responsible to deliver medication to the school clinic and to retrieve it whenever necessary or at the end of the school year.  Students are not allowed to transport any medication including over-the-counter medicines.  The only exceptions are:  students at NHS and the middle schools are allowed to carry their own Epipen, diabetic supplies/insulin, pancreatic enzymes and/or inhalers provided that the two completed authorization forms are on file.

All medication must be in a pharmacy labeled container with the following information:

Over-the-counter medication must be delivered to the nurse in its original package.  The Physician and Parent “Authorization for Dispensing Medication” forms must be completed and on file with the nurse.  Students cannot carry medications, even over-the-counter-medication such as Tylenol.  The school nurse must handle all medication.

Any student with a known severe allergic reaction requiring emergency administration of epinephrine must have an Epipen either carried by the student or in the health clinic, as well the two “Authorization for Dispensing Medication” forms.

Visiting School

All parents and other visitors are asked to enter through the main doors of the building.  Please ring the bell at the main entrance of the school’s front door.  Stand back on the white feet to allow staff to see who is there through the camera.  Staff will buzz you into the school.  Please report directly to the office to sign in and out and obtain a Brown Visitor or Volunteer badge to wear during your visit.  All visits to classrooms will follow the guidelines established by the Natick School Committee.  See below for Safety and Security Guidelines.

Visitors to Natick Public Schools

The School Committee encourages parents and citizens to visit our schools to observe and learn about instructional programs taking place.  Such visits can prove most beneficial in promotion of greater school-home cooperation and community understanding of how we carry out the school system’s mission and goals.

In our policy, we espouse a philosophy which maintains the integrity of teacher and administrator instruction and preparation time.  We also expect our administrators to establish reasonable procedures to ensure the security of our students in their schools.

A balance of appropriate security and mutual courtesy needs to be demonstrated by everyone.  

The guidelines for visits to schools are as follows:

1.        Each Natick school will schedule and clearly advertise an open-house                    program(s) each year.

2.        Visits by parents and all other interested citizens to teacher classrooms are encouraged during American Education Week.  Visits to classrooms at other times are welcomed with the prior approval of the teacher and principal.

3.        Visits by parents to several classrooms in a given grade for the purpose of comparing teaching styles to provide a basis for a request for student assignment to a particular teacher are strongly discouraged because the school district’s policy of assigning a student to a particular class is the sole responsibility of the building principal in consultation with the staff of the school.

4.        For security purposes, all visitors will report to the principal’s office upon entering and leaving the building.  Visitors will sign a guest log showing arrival and departure times and will be provided with a visitor’s badge.

5.        Under ordinary circumstances classroom observations will be strongly discouraged during the first three weeks of school and during the month of June.

6.        Any student who wishes to have a guest in school will secure permission from an administrator at least one day in advance of the proposed visit.  Upon arrival the guest will register in the office and follow the rules of appropriate behavior in that school.

7.        Principals have the authority to make accommodations for all volunteers.

Approved the Natick School Committee

October 6, 1997

SAFETY & SECURITY GUIDELINES

The following rules and guidelines have been approved by the Natick Public Schools to ensure building security and the safety of all students, and to promote the continuity of classroom instruction.

*  ALL parents /visitors MUST use the main entrance, and CHECK IN at the office to state the purpose of each visit.

*  Volunteers for any school program  (i.e. library, computer, classroom assistance, etc.) should direct their attention to that activity and remain in that area to provide maximum service for the school and the children.

*  Parents are encouraged to confer with the classroom teacher on a regular basis.  However, they should not go to any classroom without an appointment in order to avoid any classroom interruptions for the teacher and students.

*  Parents picking up a child for an early dismissal should do so at the office.  Please do not go to the classroom.  For safety reasons, no child who is a bus student will be allowed to walk home without written parental permission.  Parents picking up a child at regular dismissal time should do so at the assigned area.  Please see dismissal information in this handbook.

*  State law prohibits a motor vehicle from passing a school bus with flashing lights while children are boarding or exiting.  In your haste do not forget this matter of pupil safety.

COMMUNICATION FOLDER/VIRTUAL BACKPACK

There are red folders distributed to the students on the first day of school.  All home/school communication should be placed in the folder for the teacher.  We now have all information online in the virtual backpack and an eblast is sent home on Friday.  You can join our mailing list by going to www.natickps.org and click on join or email list. 

DRESS CODE

Students are required to dress in a reasonable and responsible manner. Students are encouraged to come to school well groomed and in appropriate attire. Any form of dress which is considered contrary to good hygiene or which is disruptive to the learning environment will not be permitted.

We encourage parents to see that their children are dressed appropriately at all times. This will ensure that students, parents, staff members, and members of the community will not be distracted, harassed, intimidated, or offended by student dress.

Inappropriate dress would consist of, but is not limited to:

• Items that promote drugs, alcohol, or tobacco

• Items with profane or sexually suggestive writing/pictures/images

• Items that exhibit involvement in gangs

• Items in conflict with community standards, district policy, or state law

• Halter tops, tube tops, or clothing that exposes the midriffs or back

• Chains, handcuffs, spikes, leather and other metal paraphernalia

Dress for Inclimate Weather

Students are scheduled for daily recess periods and need to be prepared for the variety and fluctuation of the weather. During snowy, cold or windy weather, appropriate boots, hat, gloves/mittens, ski pants, and a warm jacket are required. Students should bring in an additional pair of sneakers with their boots so that winter footwear might be removed during the day.

At Brown School we will continue to have outside line-up and recess when the temperature is 20 degrees(wind chill) or higher. It is important for all students to be prepared to go outside when the weather is cold. Below is a list of expectations we have for students to go outside for recess when the weather is above 20 degrees.

All students are expected to dress appropriately for the weather to ensure they are warm when they go outside. Students will be responsible for making that determination. (Kindergarteners and first graders will have more direct instruction about safe outdoor clothing from teachers as they as not as independent as the older students.)

If a student is not dressed appropriately for the weather and an accommodation has to be made, the teacher will contact you via email or phone call to notify you that your child was not prepared to go outside.

All students will be expected to go outside for recess. Students will not be allowed to stay inside for recess while the others are outside.

Students should wear or bring sneakers on days they are scheduled to have physical education classes. Tie or Velcro™-closure sneakers stay on during PE class better than slip-on shoes. Children should also dress comfortably in order to fully participate.

We urge parents to label ALL removable clothing. If an item is deemed missing, parents and students are encouraged to check for items in the Lost & Found area outside the office. Many quality items are never claimed and are donated to charity periodically during each school year.

LUNCH PROGRAM

All lunch counts are called in to Food Services at Natick High School by 9:15 a.m.  If your child is going to be tardy and you would like to order a lunch for them, a phone line has been set up at the school to do this.  Orders must be phoned in by 9 a.m.  Please include the day your child will be tardy, your child’s name, teacher, and the item they wish to order.  The phone line is available 24 hours a day.

Lunch Order Line for Tardy Students - Available 24 hours/day

(508) 647-6400 ext. 1161

A hot lunch is offered every day as well as three alternate lunches that change each week. A school lunch menu is posted  at http://natickps.org/departments/foodservices/main.cfm which details the daily hot lunch and other choice options as well as pricing. You can set up a lunch account online at http://natickps.org/departments/foodservices/main.cfm.

PARENT/TEACHER CONFERENCES

Individual conferences are scheduled in November and March.  These conferences are designed to review the student’s progress.  Written reports on student progress are sent home in January and June.

TEACHER QUALIFICATION

The Federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 requires school districts to notify parents of their right to know the professional qualifications of the classroom teachers who instruct their child.

Specifically, you have the right to request the following information about each of your child’s classroom teachers:

Whether or not the teacher meets the state qualifications and licensing criteria for the grades and subjects he or she teaches

Whether the teacher is teaching under emergency or provisional status because of special circumstances

The teacher’s college major, whether the teacher has any advanced degrees, and the field of discipline of the certifications or degree

Whether paraprofessionals provide services to your child and, if so, their qualifications

The Natick Public School System is committed to providing quality instruction for all students and does so by employing the most qualified individuals to teach and support each student in the classroom.   If you would like to receive any of the information listed above for your child’s teacher, please contact the Principal’s office.

PARTIES & SNACKS GUIDELINES

Classroom parties are held occasionally and are given only in coordination and with prior approval from the classroom teacher.  If a Holiday Party is planned, the teacher may send home a request through the Room Parent for donations of food or supplies.  In fairness to all children, we request that Birthday Party invitations for outside-school birthday parties not be distributed at school.  Use the Directory to address birthday invitations.  Please note, if you have requested that we not include your address and phone number, your child may not be included in family parties as most parents use this data to send invitations home to classmates.  Children are encouraged to bring in nutritious snacks daily.  No soda or glass containers, please, for snacks or in the lunch boxes.

Gift Giving Policy

The Natick School Committee honors the diversity of the pupil population it educates and the family values this population represents.  The Committee recognizes the desire of parents to express their thanks individually or collectively to a teacher or teachers.  The Committee applauds this desire.  To that end, the Natick School Committee encourages parents, if they wish, to express this appreciation for a teacher’s efforts and/or effectiveness through actions that will aid the classroom environment or the work of teachers.”  

• Massachusetts General Law Chapter 268A and State Ethics Commission rules prohibit all public employees from receiving personal gifts of “substantial value,” which according to the regulations is $50 or more.  This includes meals, tickets, services rendered, holiday gifts, etc.  


• The Ethics Commission has recently ruled that the $50 or more restriction applies
even when a group of people pools their funds to contribute to a gift.  Therefore, if multiple parents of students in the same class chip in to purchase a gift for the teacher, the teacher cannot accept it if it is worth $50 or more.  


• The law and regulations apply to any
single, personal gift to a public employee from an individual or group. An employee may accept multiple gifts from different parties, as long as each individual gift complies with the regulations.  

Contributions for educational supplies, the purchasing of books or curriculum materials for the classroom, or a donation to a PTO or organization such as the Natick Education Foundation in the educator’s name are not subject to the limit.

Programs and Services

Counseling Services

The Counselor is available to parents, students, and staff to provide support and education.  The counselor helps children adjust to school life, cope with problems, and work and play well with others.  Referrals are made directly to the Counselor by parents, teachers, or students.  Counseling may be individual or in groups using discussion or play activities.  Although the service is child-centered, the parents are involved by maintaining contact with the Counselor.  Counseling services are bias free and are available to students based on need.  The Natick Public Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or disability.

School Psychologist

The School Psychologist provides support services to students, teachers and parents.  Services are provided to students who receive special education assistance, as well as children in the regular population.  

The psychologist completes psychological evaluations and psychological screenings.  She/he develops behavior plans in collaboration with teachers and parents.  Counseling and teacher consultations related to children’s issues are also included in the role of the school psychologist.  

The psychologist is a member of the ACT and Crisis teams, and coordinates psychological/behavioral consultants within the Brown School.

Differentiated Instruction

Teachers at Brown School have received professional development on the tenets of Differentiated Instruction, which provides the opportunity for all students to receive instruction at their instruction level.  The goal of differentiated instruction is to provide a learning environment that will maximize learning for student success.  Therefore, teachers engage in effective teaching practices that allow all students to learn based on assessments and individual needs. As a result, content in each curriculum, activities, and products are developed in response to student need. Generally the focus is on state standards including key concepts, understanding and skills.  Teachers target instruction using a variety of strategies including tiered assessments, learning centers or stations, independent study, and learning buddies.  

Early Intervention Program 

Brown School has a solid Early Intervention Program that services children who are at risk for not learning or meeting the district’s ELA benchmarks, which are based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks/Standards. Upon entry into kindergarten and

first grade, students are tested and selection into each grade level program is based on entrance criteria.  In kindergarten all students are given an assessment that includes:  concepts of print, initial sound fluency, letter name fluency, word use fluency, auditory discrimination, sentence segmentation, syllable segmentation, letter sounds, rhyming discrimination and rhyming production.  Selection for participation in the KEIP program is based on district’s established criteria and teacher recommendations with final determinations made by the Reading Specialist and Principal.  Dismissal from the program is based on assessments that are given in January and May using the district’s exit criteria. The FEIP program is managed in the same manner as KEIP. However, different assessments are administered to students who did not meet the kindergarten Level B DRA end-of-year benchmark. FEIP assessments include DRA, letter ID-name and sound, concepts of print, phoneme segmentation, nonsense words, sight words, and hearing and recording sounds.  Services in both programs supplement regular classroom instruction.  

Literacy Specialist

Reading Specialists are invaluable members of the school staff. Their expertise and training in specialized reading programs enhance literacy programs through consultation with other staff members, provision of early intervention assessments and instruction, guidance in the selection of high quality literature and other instructional materials, modeling instructional methods, and conducting diagnostic reading evaluations. The Reading Specialist may provide consultation and/or direct service within the parameters of the pre-referral process (ACT), and /or special education.  

Speech/Language

Our Speech/Language Therapist provides consultation and direct instruction to address the development of phonemic awareness and related auditory processing issues.  The Speech/Language Therapist often supports students through an inclusion model within the regular classroom or through small group intervention.  Through consultation, classroom support, and direct instruction, the Speech/Language Therapist provides valuable service for both regular (under a seamless service model for 6-8 weeks) and special education students.

Special Education

The Learning Center teachers support students who demonstrate a variety of educational needs.  An Individualized Education Plan is developed for each child in order to meet his/her specific learning style.  Students work with the Learning Center staff either through an inclusion model, or in one of the Learning Centers.  The staff collaborates with the classroom teachers in order to differentiate instruction, modify curriculum, and provide appropriate accommodations.

English Language Education

When a student with limited English proficiency enrolls in the Natick Public Schools, an established assessment process determines if the student meets the criteria for ELE program enrollment. Within this program, students can be placed in a Sheltered English Immersion classroom full time or part time or they can participate in the general curriculum with instruction designed to meet their language needs while they receive in class support from the ELE teacher.  The ELE teacher is involved in consultation, planning, supporting accommodations, and monitoring student progress. Presently, Brown School houses the district wide ELE program.  

Cultural Arts Programs

Brown School, in conjunction with the Natick’s Cultural Arts Committee, brings outstanding performing arts programs to the school.  Performances are announced in the lobby.  Cultural Arts Programs are funded primarily through their respective PTO’s.  Previously sponsored programs have included: trips to Boston Symphony Hall, The Danforth Museum and Nutcracker Ballet, visits by authors, poets, and musicians, and programs with naturalists and Native Americans.  Each program makes a unique contribution to our children’s education and is designed to dovetail with each grade’s curriculum.


Elementary Learning Standards

OPEN CIRCLE:  SOCIAL COMPETENCY SKILLS PROGRAM

The Reach Out to Schools: Social Competency Program has been used in the Natick Public Schools for more than eight years.  The format of this program recognizes the critical role that relationships play in the social development and academic success of children.  By learning the social competencies necessary to make and maintain new and diverse relationships with classmates, children create new avenues for their own and other’s growth.

We have learned that the social competency of children is intimately related to their self-esteem and is strongly tied to academic success.   The Reach Out to Schools: Social Competency Program curriculum is organized around three clusters.  

        *  Creating a cooperative classroom environment

        *  Building positive relationships

        *  Solving Problems

The curriculum is implemented two times a week for 15-30 minutes during the school year.  Students and teachers meet in what is called the “Open Circle”.  The curriculum provides a structured format to facilitate the teaching of social competency skills in elementary school classrooms.  It also provides a context for discussion of other issues important to the class.  We utilized our Open Circle format directly after the events of September 11, 2001, as well as during other difficult times.

Should you have any questions regarding the Open Circle Program, please feel free to contact our guidance counselor, or your child’s classroom teacher.

Literacy:

Kindergarten

Reading as a Process

Shows an interest in stories and books

Contributes during shared & interactive reading: books, rhymes, poems, songs

Concepts about Print

Identifies parts of a book (cover, title, illustrations)

Uses directionality of print

Identifies words as separate units with boundaries

Identifies the difference between letters and words

Identifies ending punctuation

Comprehension (Reading as Understanding)

Uses pictures to help understand fiction and non-fiction texts

Uses schema (prior knowledge) to understand fiction and non-fiction texts

Makes connections with fiction and non-fiction texts

Makes reasonable predictions about fiction texts

Asks questions to understand fiction and non-fiction texts

Orally retells a story with key details (beginning, middle, end )

Orally retells important facts or events from nonfiction texts

Identifies and compares characters, settings, and major events in stories

Recognizes common types of texts (fiction or non-fiction)

Word Study

Recognizes that letters have sounds

Correctly identifies letter sounds

Recognizes and names capital letters

Recognizes and names lower case letters

Recognizes rhyming words

Produces rhyming words

Identifies and produces syllables in spoken words

Discriminates same/different sounds at the beginning of word pairs

Segments sounds in CVC words

Uses first letter of a word to confirm correct word identification

Uses last letter of a word to confirm correct word identification

Recognizes high frequency words

Recognizes and uses words with predictable patterns

Uses vocabulary appropriately

Writing as a Process

Contributes during shared and interactive writing lessons

Uses a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to communicate intended message

Attempts phonetic spelling of words (beginning, middle, and end sounds of words)

Chooses own topic to write about

Reads own writing

Refers to word wall/word charts to support word solving in writing

Writing Conventions

Uses appropriate spacing between words

Prints capital and lower case letters correctly

Uses end marks correctly

Speaking and Listening

Gives full attention to the speaker

Contributes appropriately to discussions

Follows agreed upon rules for discussion

Responds to texts and topics through speaking, drama, and art

Grade 1

Reading as a Process

Uses multiple strategies to word solve (picture clues, chunking words, rereads, reads on, connects to known word)

Uses context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

Reads grade level text accurately and with expression

Comprehension (Reading as Understanding)

Uses schema (prior knowledge)

Makes connections with text

Asks and answers questions about key details in a text

Makes reasonable predictions

Makes inferences

Uses visualization

Retells main ideas and events

Understanding Literature

Describes characters

Describes setting

Describes plot (problem and solution)

Identifies theme (central message or lesson)

Explain major differences between fiction and non-fiction

Orally retells main topic and key details in a nonfiction text

Knows and uses various text features (e.g. headings, table of contents, glossary) to locate key facts or information in a text

Identifies characteristics commonly shared by folk tales and fairy tales

Word Study

Accurately reads high frequency words

Accurately writes high frequency words

Refers to classroom resources (word walls/charts)to support word solving in reading and writing

Recognizes and uses words with predictable patterns (digraphs, -e ending, long vowel teams)

Reads and writes regularly spelled one-syllable words

Attempts phonetic spelling of irregularly spelled words

Uses content vocabulary appropriately

Speaking and Listening

Maintains focus on topic

Speaks clearly, slowly, and loudly enough to be heard

Gives full attention to speaker

Contributes appropriately to discussions

Follows agreed upon rules for discussion

Responds to literature through speaking, writing, drama, and art

Writing as a Process

Uses the writing process for pre-planning

Uses the writing process for drafting

Uses the writing process for revising

Uses the writing process for editing

Uses the writing process for illustrating to match text

Writes personal narrative with beginning, middle, end

Writes expository text with main idea and supporting details

Writes poetry

Conventions

Uses appropriate word spacing

Uses appropriate end marks 

Uses commas in dates and to separate single words in a series 

Capitalizes first word and proper nouns 

Correctly and legibly forms capital and lowercase letters and numerals

Grade 2

Reading as a process

Uses multiple strategies to word solve

Uses context to self correct

Reads grade level texts fluently and with expression


Comprehension (Reading as Understanding)

Makes connections with text

Makes predictions and confirms accuracy

Determines importance

Makes inferences

Retells main idea/events

Identifies elements of cause and effect

Identifies main idea in multiparagraph informational text

Asks and answers appropriate questions (who, what, where, when, why, how)

Identifies author’s purpose supported by evidence from text

Compares and contrasts two texts

Uses text features effectively (heading, captions, bold face print, italics, table of contents, diagrams

Understanding Literature

Correctly labels genres (fiction, nonfiction and poetry) by identifying characteristics

Identifies story elements (problem, solution, characters, setting)

Identifies theme in a fiction selection

Reads and comprehends informational text

Understands character development

Identifies dialogue and it’s purpose

Word Study

Applies understanding of letter/sound relationships in reading and writing

Applies understanding of spelling patterns in reading and writing

Uses appropriate word structure strategies to problem solve in reading and writing (compound words, syllables, contractions, plurals, prefixes and suffixes)

Accurately writes high frequency words

Understands and applies content areas vocabulary in reading and writing

Refers to classroom resources (word walls/charts) to support word solving in reading and writing

Writing as a Process

Plans a piece of writing

Applies these traits in writing across genres: Ideas and Content (crafts pieces of writing which are clearly developed with effective and rich details)

Applies these traits in writing across the genres: Organization (orders writing in ways characteristic to genre)

Applies these traits in writing across the genres: Sentence Fluency (varies sentence structures and lengths)

Applies these traits in writing across the genres: Voice (engages readers; shows enthusiasm for topic)

Applies these traits in writing across the genres: Word Choice (uses precise and/or vivid word to convey ideas)

Revises a piece to make content more clearly understood to the reading by adding, changing, or deleting

Conventions

Uses appropriate punctuation

Uses capital letters appropriately

Edits a piece of writing

Forms all manuscript letters correctly, legibly and with automaticity

Speaking and Listening

Gives full attention to the speaker

Responds to through speaking, presenting, writing, drama, art (moved from understanding literature, move back?)

Contributes appropriately to discussions

Follows agreed-upon rules for discussions

Grade 3

Reading as a Process

Reads grade level texts fluently with appropriate accuracy, phrasing, expression and rate

Use context to confirm or self correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary

Uses multiple strategies to determine meaning of unknown words

Makes appropriate and varied choices for independent reading

Comprehension (Reading as Understanding)

Demonstrates an understanding and uses all comprehension strategies: activating schema, predicting, connecting, and questioning.

Demonstrates an understanding and uses all comprehension strategies: inferring, determining importance, synthesizing

Uses text features, appropriately to enhance comprehension (chapter headings, table of contents, illustrations, charts, maps, glossaries)

Identifies elements of cause/effect in fiction and nonfiction texts

Demonstrates understanding of texts by answering questions, retelling content, providing supporting evidence, and beginning to summarize, orally and in writing

Summarizes main ideas by using story elements of fiction and providing supporting evidence

Summarizes main ideas of nonfiction by supporting evidence

Uses and applies text features to comprehend nonfiction

Understanding Literature

Identifies sensory details and figurative language in fiction and nonfiction texts

Identifies various genres and explains defining characteristics (poetry, biography, myth, fables, folktales and drama).

Identifies elements of fiction (character, setting, plot, problem, solution)

Identifies elements of poetry (rhyme, rhythm, figurative language)

Writing as a Process

Plans a piece of writing

Applies these traits in writing across genres:  Ideas and Content (crafts pieces of writing which are clearly developed with effective and rich details

Applies these traits in writing across genres:  Organization (orders writing in ways characteristic to genre)

Applies these traits in writing across genres:  Sentence Fluency (varies sentence structure and lengths)

Applies these traits in writing across genres:  Voice (engages readers; shows enthusiasm for topic)

Applies these traits in writing across genres:  Word Choice (uses precise and/or vivid words to convey ideas)

Revises piece to make content more clearly understood to the reader by adding, changing, or deleting

Conventions

Edits writing for standard English conventions (punctuation, grammar, capitalization, spelling)

Identifies, explains and uses parts of speech (e.g., nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs)

Forms all cursive letters correctly and legibly

Word Study

Applies understanding of spelling patterns in reading and writing

Uses appropriate strategies to problem solve word meanings (synonyms, antonyms, homophones, homographs, and words with multiple meanings)

Uses appropriate word structure strategies to problem solve in reading and writing (syllables, plurals, prefixes and suffixes)

Accurately reads and writes high frequency words

Understands and applies content area vocabulary in reading and writing

Refers to classroom resources (word walls, charts, glossaries and dictionaries) to support word solving in reading and writing.

Speaking and Listening

Contributes appropriately to discussions

Follows agreed upon rules for discussions

Orally communicates thinking using appropriate vocabulary

Responds to literature through speaking, writing, art, drama

Grade 4

Reading as a Process

Reads grade level texts fluently with appropriate accuracy, phrasing, expression and rate

Uses context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary

Uses multiple strategies to determine meaning of unknown words

Makes appropriate and varied choices for independent reading

Comprehension (Reading as Understanding)

Demonstrates an understanding and uses all comprehension strategies:  activating schema, predicting, connecting and questioning

Demonstrates an understanding and uses all comprehension strategies:  inferring, determining importance, synthesizing

Demonstrates an understanding of texts by answering questions, summarizing, and providing supporting evidence

Uses text structures to comprehend non-fiction (comparison, chronology, cause/effect, problem/solution)

Understanding Literature

Makes judgments about story elements (plot, setting, character, theme and point of view) and provides supporting evidence.  

Identifies various genres and explains defining characteristics (poetry, fiction, nonfiction, drama)

Recognizes author’s purpose, voice, stylistic elements (sensory details and figurative language)

Speaking and Listening

Follows agreed-upon rules for discussions

Orally communicates thinking using appropriate vocabulary

Responds to literature through speaking, writing, drama, art

Writing as a Process

Plans a piece of writing

Applies these traits in writing across genres:  Ideas and Content (crafts pieces of writing which are clearly developed with effective and rich details)

Applies these traits in writing across genres: Organization (orders writing in ways characteristic to genre)

Applies these traits in writing across genres: Sentence Fluency (varies sentence structures and lengths)

Applies these traits in writing across genres: Voice (engages readers; shows enthusiasm for topic)

Applies these traits in writing across genres: Word Choice (uses precise and/or vivid words to convey ideas)

Self-critiques writing and makes purposeful revisions (clarity, imagery, detail selection)

Conventions

Edits writing for standard English conventions (spelling, punctuation, grammar, capitalization)

Forms all cursive letters correctly, legibly with automaticity

Word Study

Applies word study concepts (patterns, word structures and meaning)

Accurately reads and writes high frequency words

Understands and applies content area vocabulary in reading and writing


Mathematics

Communications

Communicates mathematical thinking orally and through written language using pictures, numbers and/or words

Uses appropriate mathematical vocabulary and notations

Processes

Uses a variety of appropriate, accurate and efficient strategies to solve problem

Kindergarten

Content - Number Sense

Identifies numerals to 20

Rote counts by 1s to at least 100

Skip counts by 10s to 100 (change from 50)

Counts on from any given number within a known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1)

Writes numerals from 0 to 20

Counts a set of given objects and tells how many are all together

Compares sets (more than, less than, equal to) of objects

Compares two numerals (more than, less than, equal to) up to 10

Understands that numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of tens and ones

Content - Operations and Algebra

Describes, extends, and explains patterns by identifying the pattern rule

Combines and breaks up numbers to 10 in more than one way

Uses objects and drawings to model and solve related addition and subtraction problems to ten in story problems

Fluently adds and subtracts within 5

Content - Geometry

Identifies and describes basic 2-D shapes: circle, triangle, square, rectangle, hexagon

Identifies more than one way to make basic shapes

Identifies the positioning of objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to

Identifies and describes basic 3-D shapes: cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres

Content - Measurement and Data

Estimates, measures and compares the weight of objects using non-standard units of measurement (cubes, blocks)

Sorts & classifies objects by various attributes, e.g. color, size, shape, etc.

Creates and interprets graphs

Grade 1

Content: Operations and algebraic thinking

Develops and uses multiple strategies for computation and solving story problems

Demonstrates fluency for addition within 10

Demonstrates fluency for subtraction within 10

Analyzes and solves story problems involving addition and subtraction

 Content: Number and Operations in Base Ten

Skip counts and identifies patterns of 2s, 5s, and 10s

Names, writes (in numerals), orders and identifies whole numbers to 120

Understands that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones

Uses the symbols (+,-,<,>,=) to represent mathematical relationships

Given a two-digit number, mentally finds 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count

Content: Measurement and Data

Estimates and measures length of an object

Accurately measures time to the hour and half hour

Gathers, organizes, classifies, represents and interprets data

Identifies coins by value

Content: Geometry

Identifies, composes, and describes attributes of two- and three- dimensional shapes

Partitions circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describes the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters.

Grade 2
Content - Number and Operations in Base 10

Combines and breaks up numbers in a way that demonstrates understanding of number relations

Reads, writes and compares whole numbers to 1000 using < > or =

Adds strings of numbers accurately and efficiently

Counts within 1000 (skip counts by 5s, 10s, 100s beginning at any number

Adds 3-digit numbers using pictures, numbers and/or words

Subtracts 3-digit numbers using pictures, numbers and/or words

Mentally adds or subtracts 10 or 100 from a given number

Adds up to four two-digit numbers

Writes, analyzes and solves story problems involving addition and subtraction

Shows fluency, by memory, with addition facts within 20

Shows fluency, by memory, with subtraction facts within 20

Content: Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Identifies patterns on a hundreds chart (skip counts 10s, 100s) beginning at any number

Constructs and solves open sentences that have variables

uses the symbols (+ , - , < , > , = ) to represent mathematical relationships

Relates geometric ideas to numbers (seeing rows in an array as a model of repeated addition) moved from geometry

Uses strategies to prove whether a number is even or odd

Uses addition to solve word problems

Uses subtraction to solve word problems

Content: Geometry

Identifies and represents common fractions ( ½ , ⅓ , ¼ ) as parts of a whole

Recognizes and draws shapes having specified attributes

Identifies triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes

Identifies symmetry in 2-dimensional shapes

Builds and identifies rows and columns in a rectangle

Content: Measurement and Data

Tells time to 5 minutes using a.m. and p.m.

Knows the relationships of time (seconds in a minute; minutes in an hour; etc.)

Estimates length using inches, feet, centimeters, and meters

Measures an object using inches and centimeters

Measures and compares using standard units of measurement

Measures and compares units of measurement by selecting and using appropriate tools

Finds the value of a collection of coins and dollar bills

Solves word problems involving money

Draws a picture graph, bar graph, and line plot to represent a set of data with up to four categories

Analyzes data on a bar graph

Grade 3

Content - Number Sense and Operations

Combines and breaks up numbers to demonstrate understanding of number relationships

Reads, writes, and compare whole numbers to 10,000

Adds and subtracts multi-digit whole numbers accurately

Uses place value to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100

Multiplies two-digit numbers by one digit numbers

Demonstrates mastery of multiplication facts through 10X10 =100

Knows related division facts

Demonstrates an understanding of fractions as parts of unit wholes and parts of a quantity

Reads, writes and explains equivalent fractions

Understands, represents and compares fractions on a number line

Content - Patterns, Relations and Algebra

Describes, extends and explains patterns by identifying the pattern rule

Determines the value of a variable in simple equations involving the four operations

Uses the symbols +, -, x, /, <, >, = to represent mathematical relationships

Content - Geometry

Compares and classifies 2 and 3 dimensional geometric shapes by attributes

Demonstrates an understanding of geometric concepts including lines and angles

Content - Measurement and Data

Determines and uses appropriate unit of measurement, both customary and metric, to measure length, area, weight, mass and volume

Estimates and finds area and perimeter

Identifies time accurately (to the minute)

Determines elapsed time (less than one hour)

Gathers, organizes, classifies, represents and interprets data

Grade 4

Content - Number Sense and Operations

Reads, writes, and compares whole numbers to 100,000

Adds multi-digit numbers (up to 3-digit numbers)

Subtracts multi-digit numbers (up to 3-digit numbers)

Knows and uses multiplication facts through 12

Multiplies 2-digits by 2-digits

Divides up to 4-digits with a single-digit divisor

Reads, writes and compares decimals to the hundredths

Reads, writes, and compares common fractions

Adds, subtracts, and multiplies fractions

Demonstrates an understanding of fractions as parts of unit wholes, parts of a collection and as locations on the number line

Content - Patterns and Algebra

Creates, explains, and extends symbolic and numeric patterns

Uses symbols and letter variables to represent unknowns

Content - Geometry

Compares and classifies 2-dimensional geometric shapes by attributes

Demonstrates an understanding of geometric concepts (including lines, angles, and symmetry)

Content - Measurement

Measures length, area, perimeter, and volume using standard tools and unit of measurement, both English and metric

Converts units of measurement (linear, weight, time)

Computes elapsed time (hours and minutes)

Content - Data Analysis and Statistics

Gathers, organizes, and represents data

Compares and interprets data

Social Studies

Kindergarten

Gathers information from a variety of sources

Makes reasonable comparisons and draws conclusions

Develops an understanding of community within the classroom

Grade 1

Gathers information from a variety of sources

Makes reasonable comparisons and draws conclusions

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or project for folktales and true stories from America and around the world

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or project for U.S. historical events, figures, and symbols

Grade 2

Gathers information from a variety of sources

Makes reasonable comparisons and draws conclusions

Identifies oceans and continents on a world map

Researches historical topics and presents findings

Uses perspective to understand different cultures

Explains what buyers and sellers are and gives examples of goods and services that are bought and sold in the Natick community

Grade 3

Gathers information from a variety of sources

Makes reasonable comparisons and draws conclusions

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for Pilgrims and Wampanoag

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for Map Skills (cardinal directions, map scales, legends and titles)

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for Biographies of Historical Figures

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for Natick/MA/NE history through the American Revolution (study of local community as it relates to MA history)

Grade 4

Gathers information from a variety of sources

Makes reasonable hypotheses and draws conclusions

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Basic Map Skills

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Geography and People of US

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Geography and People of Ancient China

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Geography and People of Mexico and Canada


Science

Kindergarten

Gathers information through scientific process

Makes reasonable hypothesis and draws conclusions

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Orchards

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Oceans

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Matter

Grade 1

Gathers information through specific process (predicts, observes, records and interprets data)

Makes reasonable hypothesis and draws conclusions

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for seasons

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for forces and motion

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for animal characteristics

Grade 2

Gathers information through scientific process (predicts, observes, records, and interprets data)

Makes reasonable hypotheses and draws conclusions

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for local habitat

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for rainforest

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for desert

Grade 3

Gathers information through the scientific process

Makes reasonable hypotheses and draws conclusions

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for Natick’s Ecosystem (plants and animals)

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for sound

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion ,writing or projects for water

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing or projects for the Engineering Design Process

Grade 4

Gathers information through scientific process

Makes reasonable hypotheses and draws conclusions

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Plant and Animal Adaptations

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Matter and Energy

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Earth Science

Demonstrates knowledge through discussion, writing, or projects for Engineering Design and Technology

Music

Grade K

Explores sound and music through singing, movement, listening, and playing instruments

Explores concept of steady beat

Develops singing voices and build a repertoire of age-appropriate songs


Grade 1

Participates in a variety of activities, including singing games and activities involving dance and movement, that explore the concepts of steady beat, melody, and rhythm

Experiences playing a variety of instruments, including barred percussion (xylophones, metallophones, glockenspiels) drums, and assorted hand percussion instruments

Develops singing voices and build a repertoire of age-appropriate songs, with connections from various countries


Grade 2

Participates in a variety of activities, including singing games, activities involving dance and movement, and playing assorted instruments, that explore the concepts of steady beat, melody, rhythm and form

Develops singing voices and build a repertoire of age-appropriate songs

Develops ensemble skills, through participation in various group music making activities, that promote and foster teamwork, respect, tolerance, problem-solving, and creativity, as well as singing and instrumental techniques

Uses improvisation to create their own rhythmic or melodic patterns while playing instruments or using body percussion (snap, pat, clap, stamp)

Develops critical listening skills by moving to works of famous composers

Develops music vocabulary

Grade 3

Explores music literacy and further develop musical skills by learning to play the recorder

Participates in a variety of activities, including singing games, activities involving dance and movement, and playing assorted instruments, that explore the concepts of steady beat, melody, rhythm and form

Develops singing voices and build a repertoire of age-appropriate songs

Develops ensemble skills, through participation in various group music making activities, that promote and foster teamwork, respect, tolerance, problem-solving, and creativity, as well as singing and instrumental techniques

Uses improvisation to create their own rhythmic or melodic patterns while playing instruments or using body percussion (snap, pat, clap, stamp)

Develops critical listening skills by moving to works of famous composers

Develops music vocabulary


Grade 4

Participates in chorus to further develop singing skills, including singing in parts, vocal technique, learn age-appropriate repertoire and performance etiquette

Participates in a variety of activities, including singing games, activities involving dance and movement, and playing assorted instruments, that explore the concepts of steady beat, melody, rhythm and form

Develops ensemble skills, through participation in various group music making activities, that promote and foster teamwork, respect, tolerance, problem-solving, and creativity, as well as singing and instrumental techniques

Uses improvisation to create their own rhythmic or melodic patterns while playing instruments or using body percussion (snap, pat, clap, stamp)

Develops critical listening skills by moving to works of famous composers

Develops music vocabulary

Art

Kindergarten

Begins to understand basic art elements and principles (listed below) and use that understanding to create various works

Shape: Square, rectangle, triangle, and circle (geometric)

Line: Straight, curved, and zigzag

Color: Primary, secondary

Pattern

Begins to understand a variety of art materials and how to use them properly

Understands how to use and implement a variety of methods and techniques including; drawing, painting, cutting, gluing

Begins to develop art vocabulary and use appropriately

Begins to acknowledge the importance of selected influential artists and styles

Grade 1

Expands upon the exploration of basic art elements and principles (listed below) and use that understanding to create various works

Shape: Square, triangle, rectangle, circle, oval (geometric)

Line: Straight, curved, zigzag, dotted, thin, thick, horizontal

Color: Primary, secondary, warm, cool

Pattern

Texture

Expands upon the exploration of a variety of art materials and  how to use them properly

Gains experience in implementing an expanded variety of methods and techniques including; drawing, painting, collage, simple three dimensional construction

Develops additional art vocabulary and apply appropriately in classroom conversations

Identifies and explores additional selected influential artists and styles

Grade 2

Expands upon the exploration of basic art elements and principles and use that understanding to create various works

Shape: Geometric and organic

Line: Straight, curved, zigzag, dotted, thin, thick, horizontal, vertical, diagonal

Color: Primary, secondary, warm, cool, neutral

Pattern

Texture

Balance

Expands upon the exploration of variety of art materials and how to use them properly

Gains experience in implementing an expanded variety of methods and techniques including; drawing, painting, collage, simple three dimensional construction, printmaking, contour

Utilizes previous art vocabulary and develop additional art vocabulary while applying appropriately in classroom conversations as well as to their own work

Identifies and explores additional selected influential artists, styles, genres, and cultures

Grade 3

Expand upon the exploration of basic art elements and principles and use that understanding to create various works

Shape: Geometric and organic

Line: Straight, curved, zigzag, dotted, thin, thick, horizontal, vertical, diagonal, parallel

Color: Primary, secondary, warm, cool, neutral, complementary

Pattern

Texture

Balance

Contrast

Form

Value

Space  

Continues to explore a variety of art materials and their proper application

Gains experience in a variety of methods and techniques including drawing, painting, collage, printmaking, simple three dimensional construction, contour, pencil work, observational drawing

Begins to develop a more complex sense of composition in their artwork

Continues to use and develop art vocabulary in classroom conversation and as it applies to their own work and the work others

Continues exploration of art from various artists, genres, and cultures

Grade 4

Expand upon the exploration of basic art elements and principles and use that understanding to create various works

Shape: Geometric and organic

Line: Straight, curved, zigzag, dotted, thin, thick, horizontal, vertical, diagonal,  parallel

Color: Primary, secondary, warm, cool, neutral, complementary, analogous

Pattern

Texture

Balance

Contrast

Form

Value

Space  

Emphasis

Continues to explore a variety of art materials and their proper application

Explores more elaborate methods and techniques including; drawing, painting, collage, printmaking, contour, pencil work, observational drawing, three dimensional paper mache sculpture

Continues to develop a more complex sense of composition in their artwork

Continues to use and develop art vocabulary in classroom conversation and as it applies to their own work, the work others, and in their writing

Continues exploration of art from various artists, genres, and cultures

Begins to evaluate and analyze in regards to their own artwork and that of others

Physical Education

Kindergarten

Demonstrates non-locomotor movements using different parts of the body

Demonstrates a variety of locomotor and combination skills in a movement pattern

Demonstrates the emerging skills of catching, kicking, throwing, and striking

Understands the concepts of pathways, levels, and directionality (above, below, behinds, etc.)

Demonstrates knowledge of flexibility by performing exercises that enhance proper flexibility in a variety of muscle groups.

Sustains moderate to vigorous physical activity for short amounts of time

Identifies the physiological signs of moderate physical activity

Recognizes two appropriate sites on the body to monitor heart rate

Understands the relationship between physical activity and heart health

Works in a group setting without interfering with others

Recognizes that games have rules

Demonstrates the ability to work alone or in a small group without direct adult supervision

Grade 1

Responds to a variety of commands when using different combinations of shapes, levels, pathways, directions and speed

Identifies the basic elements of locomotor and non-locomotor skills

Can kick a stationary and rolling ball

Demonstrates the ability to quickly change direction and speed

Demonstrates an overhand throw using hand/foot opposition and correct body alignment

Knows how to align body and hands to catch a variety of objects

Demonstrates the ability to show the correct body alignment while striking an object with a hand or short racquet

Understands one or two components of a health-related fitness assessment

Demonstrates the ability to understand the concept of pacing during cardiovascular endurance activities

Identifies activities that promote muscular strength

Recognizes changes in heart rate and respiration during physical activity

Understands the importance of a warm-up and cool-down

Uses safe practices, rules, and procedures

Demonstrates cooperation with a partner by successfully working together to complete an assigned task

Resolves conflicts in socially acceptable ways

Recognizes the benefits that accompany cooperation and sharing

Grade 2

Demonstrates smooth transitions using locomotor skills (e.g. – run, walk, skip, leap, slide) in movement sequences

Uses the concepts of space awareness and basic movement to perform basic dances

Kicks stationary and rolling balls with a strong force while maintaining good balance

Demonstrates the ability to use an overhand throw for distance with good force

Knows various techniques for catching balls at different levels and directions

Volleys or consistently strikes objects with hand or short racquet

Demonstrates a variety of ways to establish a base of support and fundamental principles of maintaining balance

Demonstrates 2 or 3 components of health-related fitness assessment

Recognizes the physiological indicators that accompany moderate to vigorous activity

Understands that physical activity produces feelings of pleasure

Recognizes the relationship between nutrition and physical activity

Knows the difference between health and contraindicated stretches and exercises

Understands the importance of drinking water (rehydration) during vigorous physical activity

Applies rules, procedures, and safe practices requiring little or no adult or peer reinforcement

Treats others with respect during play

Reports results of work honestly

Uses feedback to improve performance

Grade 3

Demonstrates the ability to use locomotor movements and combinations in simple dances or other movement sequences

Demonstrates catching and throwing patterns with balls and other appropriate objects

Refines the skills of striking and dribbling

Understands that games have rules and boundaries and puts that knowledge into practice

Performs the skills of kicking, passing, and trapping

Demonstrates the ability to successfully strike or volley an object against the wall using the hand or a short racquet

Applies throwing, catching, and striking skills in small-sided lead up games

Recalls all of the components of health-related fitness

Completes a modified version of a health-enhancing personal fitness assessment

Understands that participation in physical activity is a conscious choice

Understands the meaning of “aerobic” and identifies various aerobic activities

Identifies the community resources available for participation in regular physical activity

Follows proper safety methods and recognizes potential risks associated with physical activities

Interacts positively with others regardless of differences

Identifies positive behaviors and comments to use during play situations

Uses several conflict resolution strategies in game play situations

Grade 4

Demonstrates ball-handling skills necessary for participating in lead-up games and sports

Demonstrates movements found in folk dance, square dance, line dance, or other rhythmic activities

Provides feedback to individuals performing striking, dribbling, throwing, catching, and other sport skills to improve performance

Integrates the knowledge of rules, boundaries, and safe use of equipment during game play

Recognizes that practice is important for skill improvement

Completes a health-related fitness assessment and scores at an acceptable level

Names the benefits derived from participation in a physical fitness program

Identifies numerous activities related to each component of physical fitness

Completes a modified version of a health-enhancing personal fitness assessment

Analyzes the relationship between nutrition and exercise in weight management

Performs and identifies a variety of activities (walking, aerobic dance, and jumping rope) that develop or maintain cardiovascular endurance

Understands target heart rate and how to monitor it

Accepts responsibility for his/her actions in play situations

Works, in a positive manner, with those of varying skill levels

Understands that time, effort, and practice has a positive effect on skill development and increased personal enjoyment

Field Days

Field days are held during the final weeks of the school year.  They are usually held over 5 days with one grade on each day.  Children are asked to bring a bottle of water, a towel to sit on, apply sunscreen before leaving home and wear a hat, sneakers and comfortable clothing.  Both team and individual events are played.  The emphasis is on fun, team spirit and sportsmanship.  Parents are encouraged to come and watch any time during the day.

Library

Students visit the library with their classes each week.  Children may check out one book that is due one week after the check out date.

School Governance

School Committee

Under the Education Reform Act of 1993, the powers and duties of Natick’s School Committee are as follows:

        

        “The school committee in each city and town and each regional school district shall have the power to select and to terminate the superintendent, shall review and approve budgets for public education in the district, and shall establish educational goals and policies for the schools in the district consistent with the requirements of law and statewide goals and standards established by the board of education.”

Natick’s School Committee is comprised of seven community members who are elected to staggered three-year terms in town-wide elections held annually in March.  A student representative from the High School also serves on the committee with non-voting status.  The High School’s Student Advisory Board makes presentations to the School Committee a few times during the year.

        

The names of the School Committee Members are listed in the annual Natick Public School Calendar and in the Brown School Directory.  Parents should direct questions, comments, and suggestions about Natick Public School’s policies, practices, and educational goals toward these elected representatives (vs. comments about specific student, class or staff issues, which should be handled through the school principal or teachers).

        

The School Committee meetings are held at 7:00 p.m. two Mondays per month in the School Committee Room at Town Hall.  The Superintendent’s office records the date, location and meeting agenda of the next School Committee meeting on an information line (508) 647-6515.   Occasionally, additional meetings are scheduled, as business requires.  When the School Committee anticipates a meeting will bring higher attendance, the meeting location may be changed to either the Morse Institute Library or the High School cafeteria.  

School Council

School Councils are one of the primary provisions mandated by the Education Reform Law of 1993.  Designed around the concepts of collaboration and involvement of the entire school community, councils provide the opportunity for these communities to assist in shaping the educational direction of their local school.  By placing the school at the center of educational planning and decision-making, teachers and administrators have the opportunity to be more responsive to the special needs of a community.  Even prior to this legislation, the Natick Public Schools supported School Improvement Councils (the predecessors of the School Council) to improve the educational experiences of students at Brown School.  By law, School Councils are responsible for assisting the principal in:

Enhancing the educational goals of the school

Assessing students’ educational needs

Reviewing the annual school budget

Formulating a school improvement plan

The Natick Elementary School Councils consist of the principal, three staff members, four parents of children in the school, and a community representative.  Teachers and parents are elected to one or two-year terms on the council by ballot system.  Central School Administration makes available certain funds for School Council.  It is up to each School Council to determine the utilization of these funds.

        

One of the primary responsibilities of the School Council is the development of a school improvement plan.  Based on the vision and philosophy of the school, this plan sets short and long-term goals for the school.  Potential features of the annual school improvement plan include the assessment of the impact of class size on learning, support for professional development of the school’s staff, methods for parental involvement in the diverse learning needs of as many children as possible, and other issues that the principal, and the School Council may find appropriate.  School improvement plans for each schoolin the state are submitted for approval to the local school communities.  In Natick, these plans are submitted in June.

        

School Councils are required to meet at least once a month and more often if necessary.  Regularly scheduled meetings are established with the first Council meeting each year.  All Council meetings are open to the public (First Tuesday of each month at 6:00 pm).  Parents are welcome to raise issues they would like discussed by their School Council.  Minutes of the meetings are available and posted on the bulletin board in the lobby.

Special Education Parents Advisory Council (SPEDPAC)

The Natick Public Schools Special Education Parent Advisory Council is a town-wide organization whose members include parents/guardians, educators, special education administrators and other interested parties.  SPEDPAC’s purpose is to share information and to provide support and input regarding the education, health, and safety of students receiving special education services. There are several meetings held per school year that include speakers addressing topics of concern or interest to parents.  Meetings are held at Town Hall in the School Committee Room.    Minutes are posted on the Natick School Department Special Education Office bulletin board at Town Hall.

Volunteer Organizations

Parent Teacher Organization (PTO)

The Brown School PTO is a volunteer organization made up of many devoted parents whose goals are to:

enrich the educational experience for our children,

support the teachers and staff, and

serve the community as a whole.

Membership to the PTO and its committees is open to all members of the Brown School community.  Specific committee descriptions and a listing of volunteer opportunities can be found in the PTO Section of the Brown School website.

The Parents Coordinating Council (PCC)

PCC was established to create a communication channel among all Natick Public School Parents and to provide a direct link to the school administration.  The PCC aims to strengthen community relations and to enhance perspectives by sharing ideas and information among the various PTOs.  PCC membership is comprised of up to three (3) parent volunteers (two from PTO and one from School Council) from each of Natick’s schools.  Each delegate customarily serves for two years and has voting rights.  All parents are encouraged to attend the meetings.

        

A typical PCC meeting begins with an invited speaker addressing a specific academic area followed by an opportunity for questions and input.  Examples of past speakers include the Superintendent of  Schools, the Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum, and the Director of Education, Technology and Media at the High School.  A regular business meeting follows the speaker presentation, which includes a report from the PCC committee’s monthly meeting with the Superintendent of Schools.  There is also an opportunity during the meeting for members to exchange information.  

        

Parents wishing to discuss a particular matter at a PCC meeting, or have one raised with the Superintendent, may request an addition to the agenda by telephoning the current Brown School liaison or by suggesting it at a PTO meeting.  Monthly PCC meetings are typically held on the third Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. in the School Committee Room at Town Hall.  Brown School PCC liaisons attend the meetings, and report pertinent information at monthly PTO and School Council meetings.  Minutes are mailed to PCC members, and can be shared with anyone interested.

Natick Education Foundation (NEF)        

The Natick Education Foundation is a nonprofit, tax exempt organization that exists to enrich, enhance and extend educational opportunities in the Natick Public Schools. By awarding mini-grants to school staff, students and others, the NEF is able to bring life to creative new ideas for enriching programs.  

        

The NEF raises funds to support their goals by sponsoring events such as the annual Spelling Bee, and the Grant Awards: “A Taste of Natick” social evening in the spring, and making annual appeals for support to Natick residents and local businesses.  NEF volunteers include individual parents and members of Natick’s academic community who assist in the grant screening process or with fund-raisers.  The Brown School liaison for the NEF attends the monthly meetings and reports pertinent information at PTO meetings.  Regularly scheduled NEF meetings are held monthly.  Meetings are open to the public, and interested volunteers are always welcome.


Student Rights & Responsibilities

Home and school must work in a cooperative way to support the proposition that students have responsibilities as well as rights.  Together, we must foster a mutuality of respect within the school environment.  A goal of our elementary schools is to develop and maintain a positive self-image for each student combined with an appreciation for the rights of other persons with whom he or she interacts.

The elementary principals have prepared this statement to help families to understand what we expect of and for your children.  We are requesting that you review with your children the expectations that we have of him or her and the expectations that you should have of the school and classroom.

If the rules of the classroom and/or the school are not obeyed, the students will be disciplined by the teacher and, if deemed necessary, by the principal.  If the rules of the classroom and/or school continue to be broken, parents will be notified and privileges will be withheld.  Parents and students will be invited to meet in conferences.  Call your child’s principal if clarification of this procedure is necessary.

Student Rights It is expected that children will:

1.        Be respected and treated with kindness and understanding

2.        Enjoy learning in an atmosphere that will lead to success

3.        Be treated as individuals in order to develop a positive self-image

4.        Learn to appreciate the purposes and understand the penalties associated with all of the school rules

5.        Be assured of safety while at school

6.        Be taught with a sufficient amount and variety of materials and methods

7.        Have teachers who will show fairness and firmness

8.        Receive training in manners and respect for others

9.        Expect consistency in the application of corrective discipline

10.        Be helped toward learning to assume responsibility for their behavior

Student Responsibilities It is expected that children will:

1.        Accept others regardless of size, race, creed, nationality, ability, or physical appearance

2.        Do all that is educationally possible by completing class and homework assignments

3.        Cooperate so that their activities will not interfere with the rights of others

4.        Listen to and follow directions of those in authority

5.        Be honest with themselves, teachers, and parents

6.        Be willing to accept constructive criticism

7.        Be polite and show concern for the values and feelings of others

8.        Respect the person and property of others

9.        Be sure that school papers and reports are taken home and, as needed, returned to school promptly

10.        Cooperate & obey rules set up for areas such as the cafeteria, playground, and buses

Courtesy and Conduct

NPS implements the Social Competency Program, “Open Circle”, in all K-4 classes.  The purpose of the program is to build a positive, cooperative classroom and school community by teaching communication and social problem solving skills.  The program’s goals are to:

Build a cooperative, caring environment in the classroom

Enhance the communication, social, and problem solving skills of individual students

Enable students to develop self-control and take responsibility for their own behavior

Courtesy and respect for the rights of others should be the key to a student’s conduct at school.  Students are expected to respect the rights and privileges of others, respect constituted authority, conform to school rules, and conform to those provisions of law that apply to their conduct.  School and families must work together to help each student develop and demonstrate a respectful attitude toward teachers and fellow students.

The following are basic student conduct guidelines used throughout the school:

·        Students should keep hands, feet, and objects to themselves at all times

·        Students should not engage in teasing or name-calling

·        Students should follow directions and adhere to classroom and school wide rules

To view a copy of the Brown School Incident report and Code of Conduct click on the link

DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES

Repeated failure of a student to demonstrate appropriate conduct will be directly communicated to parents.  Logical consequences for infractions may involve any of several levels of disciplinary action including conferences with student, parents, staff and/or the principal; written accounts of incidents; phone calls to parents; loss of privileges such as but not limited to removal from recess, the lunchroom, or the bus; restitution or tasks designed to redress infractions; time-out, in-school suspension, at-home suspension, and expulsion from school in accordance with Chapter 76, Section 17 of the Massachusetts General Law.

Any of the following actions engaged in while on school property or while part of a school activity off school grounds may subject a student to disciplinary measures including the full range of actions outlined above as logical consequences for infractions:

Intentionally causing, attempting to cause, or threatening to cause physical injury to another person

Intentionally causing, attempting to cause, or threatening to cause damage to school property or private property located at school; stealing or attempting to steal school property or private property located at school or while part of a school activity off school grounds

Repeatedly and intentionally defying the valid authority of supervisors, teachers, or administrators

Determination of the appropriate disciplinary action will be made by the staff involved with the student and, when appropriate, by the principal.  Actions will be geared to realizing three interrelated goals:

1. Elimination of the inappropriate student behavior

2. Development of positive, more productive student behavior

3. Provision of an appropriate learning environment for all students

SUSPENSION FROM SCHOOL

The following offenses are considered serious enough to warrant a suspension from school.  Parents will be notified by phone or letter.  The Superintendent of Schools will be notified in writing of the reason(s) for the suspension.  The student is responsible for making up all missed work.  After a suspension, the school may request a conference with parents/guardians before the student may return to his/her program.

Tobacco, alcohol, or other drugs

Use of tobacco on school property, school buses, and field trips

Possession, use or sale of alcohol or other drugs on school property, school buses, or field trips - Police will be notified

Any act of vandalism to school property – such as furniture, books, equipment, lavatories, which cannot be satisfactorily corrected by the student

Disrespectful or threatening behavior directed toward a staff member

Stealing

Throwing or misuse of food

Possession, use, or sale of any dangerous or illegal devises (e.g. fireworks, knives, firearms, etc.)

Leaving school property without permission

Disobedience to a teacher or administrator

Extorting money from others

Causing a fire, false alarm or bomb scare

Causing a fight, fighting, and/or willfully causing harm to another person

Making a racial or other discriminating slur towards another person on school grounds

Making a verbal threat towards another person on school grounds

Hazing

A suspension from school may be up to (10) days; most suspensions are for 1 to 3 days in length depending on the scope and severity of the infraction.  Chronic offenses or situations that result in the violation of federal, state, or local laws or property damage or bodily injury, can be cause for suspension of up to ten days.

EXPULSION FROM  SCHOOL

The Natick School Committee having conducted two public readings of the following policy voted to adopt it at its meeting of June 28, 2003.  The Education Reform Act of 1993 (Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 71, Section 37H) required all school committees tin the Commonwealth to promulgate such a policy among its personnel, student body, and other individuals:

Any student who is found on school premises or at school-sponsored or school-related events, including athletic games, in possession of a dangerous weapon, including, but not to limited to, a gun or a knife, or a controlled substance as defined in Chapter 94C, including but not limited to, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin, may be subject to expulsion from the school or school district by the principal

Any student who assaults a principal, assistant principal, teacher, teacher’s assistant, or other educational staff member on school premises or at school-sponsored or school related events, including athletic games, may be subject to expulsion from the school or school district by the principal

Any student who is charged with a violation of either paragraph (a) or (b) shall be notified in writing of an opportunity for a hearing; provided, however, that the student may have representation, along with the opportunity to present evidence and witnesses at said hearing before the principal.

DUE PROCESS RIGHTS

Before a student is temporarily suspended from public school, the student has the constitutional right to receive:

Oral or written notice of the charges against him/her

An exploration of the evidence against him/her

The opportunity to present his/her side of the story to an impartial decision maker (who may be a school administrator)

A student has the right to appeal a suspension decision.  The appeal must be made first to the building principal.  If the student wishes to pursue his/her appeal, it is taken to the Superintendent of Schools and then if it is still unresolved, to the School Committee for resolution.

Special Needs Discipline

All students are expected to meet the requirements for behavior as set forth in the Student Handbook.  Chapter 71a of the Massachusetts General Laws, known as Chapter 766, requires that additional provisions be made for students who have been found by an evaluation TEAM to have special needs and whose program is described in an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP).  The following additional requirements apply to the discipline of special needs students.

Definition:

Suspension shall be defined as any action which results in the removal of a student from the program which is prescribed in his/her Individualized Educational Plan (IEP).  This includes in-school suspensions as well as any exclusion from transportation services that prohibits the student’s participation in his/her prescribed program.

Procedure:

IEP for every special needs student will indicate whether the student can be expected to meet the regular discipline code or if the student’s handicapping condition requires modification.  Any modification will be described in the IEP

The Principal (or designee) will notify the Special Education office of the suspendible offense of a special needs student, and a record will be kept of such notice.

When it is known that the suspension(s) of a special needs student will accumulate to ten days in a school year, a review of the IEP as provided in Section 333 of the Chapter 766 Regulations will be held to determine the appropriateness of the student’s placement in the program.  The TEAM will make a finding as to the relationship between the student’s misconduct and his/her handicapping condition and either:

a.        Design a modified program for the students or

b.        Write an amendment to provide for the delivery of special education services during the suspension and any needed modification of the IEP relative to discipline code exceptions.

In addition, the Department of Education will be notified by a SPED administrator as required by law, and the procedures promulgated by the Department of Education for requesting approval of the alternative plan will be followed.

Bus Conduct

Children are required to behave on buses in a manner that allows for the safety of all.  The right of students to ride a bus is contingent upon their good behavior and their observance of established bus behavior expectations.  It is the bus driver’s duty to notify the principal if any student continues to violate established rules of conduct.  The principal may withhold from the student the privilege of riding the school bus for a violation of established regulations.

Bus Conduct Regulations - The Natick School Committee considers the school bus as an extension of the school itself; rules regarding behavior are the same as in the school.  School bus safety is a primary concern of the Natick Public Schools and we reserve the right to take whatever action is necessary to maintain a high level of safety.  The right of a pupil to school bus transportation is a qualified right, dependent on good behavior.  In cases where a pupil seriously or continuously misbehaves, the principal or designee of the school will notify parents.  The bus pass will be revoked if, in the opinion of the principal, such action is necessary for the general safety and wellbeing of other students.  In cases where a pupil’s conduct jeopardizes the safety and wellbeing of other students, based upon the assessment of the driver, that pupil may be immediately excluded from the bus.

The procedure for handling behavior problems, including bad language, on school buses shall be as follows:

        a. First Offense—A letter and the Bus Conduct Form shall be sent from the Principal of the school or Transportation Coordinator to the parents of the student advising the parents of the offense.

        b. Second Offense—Bus privileges may be revoked for a two-week period and parents shall be so notified by the Principal of the school the student attends.

        c. Third Offense—Transportation privileges may be taken away from the student for the remainder of the school year, and the parents shall be so notified by the Principal of the school the student attends of the offense. There are no refunds if privileges are revoked.

Pupils who ride the school bus are expected to be familiar with the following:  

Pupils shall stand on the sidewalk or another designated place while waiting for the school bus.  They shall respect other people’s property, respect the right of other people to pass on the sidewalk, and display manners that indicate consideration and safety for others.

Pupils shall never approach a school bus until it has completely stopped and the door is opened. In boarding the bus, they should proceed in an orderly manner, single file.  Younger students should board and alight first from the bus.  

Pupils shall not open windows without permission. They may not throw anything out of the window, or put their hands, arms, or any parts of their bodies out of the window at anytime.  They may not open the rear exit emergency door unless there is an emergency or the driver directs them.

In crossing the roadway after alighting from the bus, pupils should cross only in front of the bus when the blinking lights are on and the stop sign is extended.  They should pass at least 10 feet in front of the bus and look for traffic in both directions before crossing the roadway.  Pupils should never run beside a bus, chase after a bus, or pick up anything that has fallen near the wheels of a bus.

The bus driver has full authority as well as responsibility for control of the conduct of pupils while they are on the bus.  Pupils should not annoy the operator or distract his/her attention from driving. They should be treated with courtesy and respect at all times.

There shall be no pushing, striking, or general fooling around.  Pupils are not allowed to use profane or abusive language.  Pupils who witness the destruction of property have a responsibility to report such misbehavior to the driver or school authorities.

All Town paid and Fee-Based students are issued a bus pass that they must show to the driver each day upon entering the bus.  The pass entitles students a school bus ride to and from school. In the event a student loses a bus pass, a duplicate pass may be obtained from the Transportation Office for $5.00.

A student who allows another student to use his/her bus pass or sells his/her bus pass is subject to having the bus pass privileges revoked.

Do not bring large art projects or instruments (ex. cello), animals, pets, or large objects on the school bus.  Under no circumstances should firearms, explosives, or weapons be brought onto a school bus. Lunch boxes, smaller musical instruments, and small athletic equipment (those which can easily be transported on a student’s lap or under the seat) must be kept out of the aisle.          

Vandalism, destruction, or defacing of property will not be tolerated.

There is no smoking, eating, or drinking on the school bus.  The bus must be kept neat without litter.        

A pupil who pays a fee for transportation and whose riding privileges are suspended because of violation of these rules will not receive a fee refund.

SECTION 1. Section 37H of chapter 71 of the General Laws, as appearing in the 2010 Official Edition, is hereby amended by striking out subsection (e) and inserting in place thereof the following 3 subsections:-

(e) Any school district that suspends or expels a student under this section shall continue to provide educational services to the student during the period of suspension or expulsion, under section 21 of chapter 76. If the student moves to another district during the period of suspension or expulsion, the new district of residence shall either admit the student to its schools or provide educational services to the student in an education service plan, under section 21 of chapter 76.

(f) Districts shall report to the department of elementary and secondary education the specific reasons for all suspensions and expulsions, regardless of duration or type, in a manner and form established by the commissioner. The department of elementary and secondary education shall use its existing data collection tools to obtain this information from districts and shall modify those tools, as necessary, to obtain the information. On an annual basis, the department of elementary and secondary education shall make district level de-identified data and analysis, including the total number of days each student is excluded during the school year, available to the public online in a machine readable format. This report shall include district level data disaggregated by student status and categories established by the commissioner.

(g) Under the regulations promulgated by the department, for each school that suspends or expels a significant number of students for more than 10 cumulative days in a school year, the commissioner shall investigate and, as appropriate, shall recommend models that incorporate intermediary steps prior to the use of suspension or expulsion. The results of the analysis shall be publicly reported at the school district level.

SECTION 2. Section 37H½ of said chapter 71, as so appearing, is hereby amended by striking out the last paragraph and inserting in place thereof the following paragraph:-

Any school district that suspends or expels a student under this section shall continue to provide educational services to the student during the period of suspension or expulsion, under section 21 of chapter 76. If the student moves to another district during the period of suspension or expulsion, the new district of residence shall either admit the student to its schools or provide educational services to the student under an education service plan, under section 21 of chapter 76.

SECTION 3. Said chapter 71 is hereby further amended by inserting after section 37H½ the following section:-

Section 37H¾. (a) This section shall govern the suspension and expulsion of students enrolled in a public school in the commonwealth who are not charged with a violation of subsections (a) or (b) of section 37H or with a felony under section 37H½.

(b) Any principal, headmaster, superintendent or other person acting as a decision-maker at a student meeting or hearing, when deciding the consequences for the student, shall exercise discretion; consider ways to re-engage the student in the learning process; and avoid using expulsion as a consequence until other remedies and consequences have been employed.

(c) For any suspension or expulsion under this section, the principal or headmaster of a school in which the student is enrolled, or a designee, shall provide, to the student and to the parent or guardian of the student, notice of the charges and the reason for the suspension or expulsion in English and in the primary language spoken in the home of the student. The student shall receive the written notification and shall have the opportunity to meet with the principal or headmaster, or a designee, to discuss the charges and reasons for the suspension or expulsion prior to the suspension or expulsion taking effect. The principal or headmaster, or a designee, shall ensure that the parent or guardian of the student is included in the meeting, provided that such meeting may take place without the parent or guardian only if the principal or headmaster, or a designee, can document reasonable efforts to include the parent or guardian in that meeting. The department shall promulgate rules and regulations that address a principal’s duties under this subsection and procedures for including parents in student exclusion meetings, hearings or interviews under this subsection.

(d) If a decision is made to suspend or expel the student after the meeting, the principal or headmaster, or a designee, shall update the notification for the suspension or expulsion to reflect the meeting with the student. If a student has been suspended or expelled for more than 10 school days for a single infraction or for more than 10 school days cumulatively for multiple infractions in any school year, the student and the parent or guardian of the student shall also receive, at the time of the suspension or expulsion decision, written notification of a right to appeal and the process for appealing the suspension or expulsion in English and in the primary language spoken in the home of the student; provided, however, that the suspension or expulsion shall remain in effect prior to any appeal hearing. The principal or headmaster or a designee shall notify the superintendent in writing, including, but not limited to, by electronic means, of any out-of-school suspension imposed on a student enrolled in kindergarten through grade 3 prior to such suspension taking effect. That notification shall describe the student’s alleged misconduct and the reasons for suspending the student out-of-school. For the purposes of this section, the term “out-of-school suspension” shall mean a disciplinary action imposed by school officials to remove a student from participation in school activities for 1 day or more.

(e) A student who has been suspended or expelled from school for more than 10 school days for a single infraction or for more than 10 school days cumulatively for multiple infractions in any school year shall have the right to appeal the suspension or expulsion to the superintendent. The student or a parent or guardian of the student shall notify the superintendent in writing of a request for an appeal not later than 5 calendar days following the effective date of the suspension or expulsion; provided, that a student and a parent or guardian of the student may request, and if so requested, shall be granted an extension of up to 7 calendar days. The superintendent or a designee shall hold a hearing with the student and the parent or guardian of the student within 3 school days of the student’s request for an appeal; provided that a student or a parent or guardian of the student may request and, if so requested, shall be granted an extension of up to 7 calendar days; provided further, that the superintendent, or a designee, may proceed with a hearing without a parent or guardian of the student if the superintendent, or a designee, makes a good faith effort to include the parent or guardian. At the hearing, the student shall have the right to present oral and written testimony, cross-examine witnesses and shall have the right to counsel. The superintendent shall render a decision on the appeal in writing within 5 calendar days of the hearing. That decision shall be the final decision of the school district with regard to the suspension or expulsion.

(f) No student shall be suspended or expelled from a school or school district for a time period that exceeds 90 school days, beginning the first day the student is removed from an assigned school building.

SECTION 4. Section 1 of chapter 76 of the General Laws, as appearing in the 2010 Official Edition, is hereby amended by striking out, in lines 2 to 13, inclusive, the words “, except a child between fourteen and sixteen who meets the requirements for the completion of the sixth grade of the public school as established by said board and who holds a permit for employment in private domestic service or service on a farm, under section eighty-six of chapter one hundred and forty-nine, and is regularly employed thereunder for at least six hours per day, or a child between fourteen and sixteen who meets said requirements and has the written permission of the superintendent of schools of the town where he resides to engage in non-wage-earning employment at home, or a child over fourteen who holds a permit for employment in a cooperating employment, as provided in said section eighty-six,”.

SECTION 5. Said section 1 of said chapter 76, as so appearing, is hereby further amended by striking out, in line 14, the words “said town” and inserting in place thereof the following words:- the town the student resides.

SECTION 6. Said section 1 of said chapter 76, as so appearing, is hereby further amended by striking out the fourth paragraph.

SECTION 7. Said chapter 76 is hereby further amended by inserting after section 1A the following section:-

Section 1B. The school committee of each city, town or regional school district shall have a pupil absence notification program in each of its schools. The program shall be designed to ensure that each school notifies a parent or guardian of the child’s absence if the school has not received notification of the absence from the parent or guardian within 3 days of the absence.

Each school committee shall have a policy of notifying the parent or guardian of a student who has at least 5 days in which the student has missed 2 or more periods unexcused in a school year or who has missed 5 or more school days unexcused in a school year. The notification policy shall require that the school principal or headmaster, or a designee, make a reasonable effort to meet with the parent or guardian of a student who has 5 or more unexcused absences to develop action steps for student attendance. The action steps shall be developed jointly and agreed upon by the school principal or headmaster, or a designee, the student and the student’s parent or guardian and with input from other relevant school personnel and officials from relevant public safety, health and human service, housing and nonprofit agencies.

SECTION 8. Section 18 of said chapter 76, as so appearing, is hereby amended by striking out the first paragraph and inserting in place thereof the following 3 paragraphs:-

No student who has not graduated from high school shall be considered to have permanently left public school unless an administrator of the school which the student last attended has sent notice within a period of 5 days from the student’s tenth consecutive absence to the student and the parent or guardian of that student in both the primary language of the parent or guardian, to the extent practicable, and English. The notice shall initially offer at least 2 dates and times for an exit interview between the superintendent, or a designee, and the student and the parent or guardian of the student to occur prior to the student permanently leaving school and shall include contact information for scheduling the exit interview. The notice shall indicate that the parties shall agree upon a date and time for the exit interview, and that interview shall occur within 10 days after the sending of the notice. The time for the exit interview may be extended at the request of the parent or guardian and no extension shall be for longer than 14 days. The superintendent, or a designee, may proceed with any such interview without a parent or guardian if the superintendent, or a designee, makes a good faith effort to include the parent or guardian. The exit interview shall be for the purpose of discussing the reasons for the student permanently leaving school and to consider alternative education or other placements.

The superintendent or a designee shall convene a team of school personnel, such as the principal, guidance counselor, teachers, attendance officer and other relevant school staff, to participate in the exit interview with the student and the parent or guardian of the student. During the exit interview, the student shall be given information about the detrimental effects of early withdrawal from school, the benefits of earning a high school diploma and the alternative education programs and services available to the student.

The department of elementary and secondary education shall: (i) publish a model protocol for conducting exit interviews with students; and (ii) compile and maintain a list of research and information relative to the consequences of dropping out, the benefits of earning a high school diploma and a list of alternative education resources and programs available to the student, in addition to those that the district may provide, that schools shall present at the exit interview.

SECTION 9. Said chapter 76 is hereby further amended by inserting after section 20 the following section:-

Section 21. Principals and headmasters shall ensure that students who are suspended from school for 10 or fewer consecutive days, whether in or out of school, shall have an opportunity to make academic progress during the period of suspension, to make up assignments and earn credits missed including, but not limited to, homework, quizzes, exams, papers and projects missed. Principals shall develop a school-wide education service plan for all students who are expelled or suspended from school for more than 10 consecutive school days, whether in or out of school. Principals shall ensure these students have an opportunity to make academic progress during the period of suspension or expulsion, to make up assignments and earn credits missed, including, but not limited to, homework, quizzes, exams, papers and projects missed. Education service plans may include, but are not limited to, tutoring, alternative placement, Saturday school, and online or distance learning. In developing the education service plan, principals may seek the cooperation or input of relevant health and human service, housing and nonprofit agencies education collaboratives, and other service providers. Any school or school district that expels a student or suspends a student for more than 10 consecutive school days shall provide the student and the parent or guardian of the student with a list of alternative educational services. Upon selection of an alternative educational service by the student and the student’s parent or guardian, the school or school district shall facilitate and verify enrollment in the service. Students exempt from attending school under section 1 of chapter 76 shall not be subject to this section.

Instructional costs associated with providing alternative educational services under this section shall be eligible for reimbursement under section 5A of chapter 71B, subject to appropriation. The reimbursements shall be in addition to amounts distributed under chapter 70 and shall not be included in the calculation of base aid, as defined in section 2 of said chapter 70, for any subsequent fiscal year. Instructional costs eligible for reimbursement shall include only those costs directly attributable to providing alternative educational services under this section, such as salary of educational personnel, salary of related services personnel, costs for specialized books, materials or equipment, tuition costs, if the student is receiving services from other than the local public school, consultant costs if directly attributable to the student’s instructional program and instructional costs of extended day or year services if such services are a part of the education service plan. Such costs shall be prorated as appropriate to reflect group activities or costs for part-time services. Instructional costs shall not include transportation costs, administrative or overhead costs, the costs of adapting classrooms or materials that are used by more than 1 student, the costs of fringe benefits of personnel employed by the school district, nor the costs associated with the development of the education service plan or service coordination for the student. Instructional costs associated with an education service plan shall be reported to and approved by the department and shall be reimbursed according to the formula and procedures in said section 5A of said chapter 71B.

SECTION 10. The department of elementary and secondary education shall submit an annual report to the chairs of the joint committee on education on the cost of providing reimbursement for instructional costs associated with providing alternative educational services under section 21 of chapter 76 of the General Laws that would not otherwise be reimbursed under section 5A of chapter 71B of the General Laws.

SECTION 11. The department of elementary and secondary education shall issue a report on the costs of implementation of this act not later than November 30, 2013. The department of elementary and secondary education shall file a report with the clerks of the senate and house of representatives, who shall forward the report to the chairs of the joint committee on education and the senate and house committees on ways and means.

SECTION 12. Sections 1 to 10, inclusive, shall take effect on July 1, 2014.

Student Internet Acceptable Use Policy

The Internet is a vast network which links together computers world-wide.  The Internet can provide students with boundless opportunities.  The Natick Public Schools expects users of the Internet to be responsible for their own actions.  It is the purpose of this policy to ensure that all who use the Internet do so in an appropriate manner.  

        

The Natick Public Schools supports and respects each family’s right to decide whether or not to allow their child to utilize the Internet connections available in the school buildings.  Parents and/or guardians of students are encouraged to provide guidance and support for their child in the proper use of the Internet.

        

The Natick Public Schools will provide, where available, access to the Internet for students.  Access will be granted upon receipt of a signed Acceptable Use Agreement.  All students will be given proper instruction on the use of the Internet as part of our educational program incorporating technology into our curriculum.

        

Following are the Student Internet Acceptable Use Guidelines and Agreement:

Student Internet Use Guidelines

Etiquette

Natick’s primary use of the Internet is educational.  Any student who is connected to the Internet for non-educational use will immediately log off if their use is interfering with the educational access by other users.

Proper etiquette is expected of all users of Natick Public Schools Internet access.  Users are expected to be courteous and use appropriate language.  Users will not write or send abusive messages.

If a student notices any suspicious or unusual activity while using Internet access, it should be reported immediately to the supervising or appropriate staff member.

Personal information should not be transmitted through the Internet.  It is strongly advised not to reveal any personal addresses, phone numbers, credit card numbers, bank account numbers or other private information of any individual.  In addition, students should not share passwords associated with the use of the network.

Transmission of obscene materials is prohibited.  Should a user happen to find materials which may be inappropriate while using Natick Public School’s Internet access, he/she shall refrain from downloading this material and shall not identify or share the location of this material.  Be aware that the transfer of certain kinds of materials may be illegal and punishable by law.

While using the Internet, no user shall utilize the resource to perform any act which can be construed as illegal or unethical.

Electronic mail is not guaranteed to be private.  Use of inappropriate language can result in suspension of Internet privileges.

Hardware/Software

Any installation of hardware or software to the network must be approved by the Department of Instructional Technology.  Vandalism or any malicious attempt to harm or destroy any hardware or data of another user will not be tolerated.  Any questionable activity will result in suspension of use and the offending action will be reviewed by the administration for further disciplinary action.

When using the Internet to access Natick’s or other organizations’ networks or other computing resources, each user must comply with all rules for that network.  Modifications to software on any computer system being used on the network will not be tolerated.

The Natick Public Schools makes no guarantees regarding the reliability of the data content and data connection.  In addition, neither the Natick Schools nor the Internet Service Provider shall be liable for any loss or damage of data while the connection is in use.  

The Natick Public School system reserves the right to examine any data stored on any computer which is used for Internet access.

Copyright

The Natick Public School system disapproves of illegal copying and distribution of software.  Any student who is found transferring such material shall have their use of the Internet suspended immediately.

All users shall be aware that illegal distribution of software and the violation of copyright laws are federal offenses and are punishable by fine or imprisonment.

Commercial Activity

Use of the Internet in the Natick Public Schools for commercial activities of any kind by anyone including but not limited to sales or promotions of products or services, for unauthorized solicitations on behalf of charities or other organizations or persons, for political lobbying or for illegal activities is strictly prohibited.

The Natick Public School’s administration reserves the right to change and/or update these guidelines when necessary.  The administration reserves the right to suspend specific user access at any time.

Adopted:  October 6, 1997

                           

                   

Sexual Harassment, Bullying & Hazing Policy

  I.        Policy

A.        It is the policy of the Natick Public Schools to provide a learning and working atmosphere for students, employees and visitors free from sexual harassment, bullying, hazing, and intimidation.  These terms are referenced herein as “harassment”.  Such action may occur on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, age, gender, sexual orientation or disability, or for any other reason.

B.        It is a violation of this policy for any administrator, teacher or other employee, or any student to engage in or condone harassment in school or to fail to report or otherwise take reasonable corrective measures when they become aware of an incident of harassment.

C.        This policy is not designed or intended to limit the school’s authority to take disciplinary action or take remedial action when such harassment occurs out of school but has a nexus to school, or is disruptive to an employee’s or student’s work or participation in school related activities.  

        Reports of cyber bullying by electronic or other means, occurring in or out of school will be reviewed and, when a nexus to work or school exists, will result in  discipline. Parents of students alleged to have engaged in cyber harassment will be invited to attend a meeting at which the activity, words or images subject to the complaint will be reviewed.  A student disciplined for cyberbullying will not be re-admitted to the regular school program until his or her parent(s) attend such meeting.    

D.        It is the responsibility of every employee, student and parent to recognize acts of harassment and take every action necessary to ensure that the applicable policies and procedures of this school district are implemented.

E.        Any employee or student who believes that he or she has been subjected to harassment has the right to file a complaint and to receive prompt and appropriate handling of the complaint. Further, all reasonable efforts shall be made to maintain the confidentiality and protect the privacy of all parties, but proper enforcement of this policy may require disclosure of any or all information received.  

F.        The Building Principal/Designee shall be responsible for assisting employees and students seeking guidance or support in addressing matters relating to any form of harassment.

 II.        Procedures

        A.        Definitions – Sexual Harassment Prohibited  

“Sexual Harassment” means unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other inappropriate verbal, written, electronically transmitted, or physical conduct of a sexual nature, including but not limited to unwelcome comments, touching, written notes, pictures/cartoons or other inappropriate conduct, such as leering, whistling, brushing up against the body, commenting on sexual activity or body parts or other activity referred to by the Model MCAD policy prohibiting such behavior.   Harassment has the effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or learning environment that takes place under any of the following circumstances:

1.        When submission to such conduct is made, explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of employment, instruction, or participation in school activities or programs;

2.        When submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used by the offender as the basis for making personal or academic decisions affecting the individual subjected to sexual advances;

3.        When such conduct has the effect of unreasonably interfering with the individual's work, attendance at school or participation in academic or curricular activities, or...

4.        When such conduct has the effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or learning environment.

B.        Definitions – Bullying Prohibited

Bullying may take a variety of forms.  It is unacceptable in a school or work environment.  As a result no student or employee shall be subjected to harassment, intimidation, bullying, or cyberbullying in any public educational institute:

“Bullying and cyberbullying,” means unwelcome written, electronic, verbal or physical acts or gestures where a student or employee feels coerced, intimidated, harassed or threatened and under the circumstances  (1) may cause a reasonable person to suffer physical or emotional harm to a student or employee, (2) may cause damage to another student’s or employee’s property, or (3) may cause a disruptive or hostile school environment.   The behavior must interfere with an employee’s ability to perform his or her duties or with a student’s academic performance or ability to learn, or interfere with a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from services, activities, or privileges:  

that are being offered through the school district; or

During any education program or activity; or

While in school, on school equipment or property, in school vehicles, on school buses, at designated school bus stops, at school-sponsored activities, at school-sanctioned events; or

Through the use of data, telephone or computer software that is accessed through a computer, computer system, or computer network or any public education institute.

As used in this Section, “electronic communication” means any communication through an electronic device including a telephone, cellular phone, computer or pager.

C.        Definitions – Hazing Prohibited

The term “hazing” shall mean any conduct or method of initiation, even if  consented to, into any student organization, whether on public or private property, which willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of any student or other person.  

Such conduct shall include, but is not limited to, whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics, exposure to the weather, forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug or other substance or any other brutal treatment or forced physical activity which is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety of any such student or person, or which subjects such student or other person to extreme mental stress, including extended deprivation of sleep or rest or extended isolation.

Whoever knows that another person is the victim of hazing and is at the scene of such activity, shall, to the extent that such person can do so without danger or peril to himself or others, report such activity to an appropriate law enforcement official as soon as reasonably practicable.  Whoever fails to report such behavior shall be subject to discipline.

         

        

        D.   Guidelines for Investigating Harassment Claims

In school systems, harassment may take many forms and cross many lines.  The situation may be an instance of staff member to staff member, staff member to student, student to staff member, or student to student.  Guidelines for dealing with any charge of harassment are as follows:

        1.        By law, harassment is defined by the victim’s perception in combination with objective standards or expectations.  What one person may consider acceptable behavior may be viewed as harassment by another person.  Therefore, in order to protect the rights of both parties, it is important that the victim make it clear to the harasser that the behavior is objectionable.

2.        In all charges of harassment, the victim should describe in writing the specifics of the complaint to ensure that the subsequent investigation is focused on the relevant facts.  Oral and anonymous complaints will be reviewed but are inherently difficult to investigate and may not be procedurally fair; as a result no disciplinary action shall be taken on anonymous complaints unless verified by clear and convincing evidence.  All other complaints will be reviewed based on a preponderance of evidence standard.

        3.        Any school employee that has reliable information that would lead a reasonable person to suspect that a person is a target of harassment, bullying, or intimidation shall immediately report it to the administration; each school shall document any prohibited incident that is reported and confirmed, and report all incidents of discrimination, harassment, intimidation, bullying or cyberbullying and the resulting consequences, including discipline and referrals, to the Superintendent’s office as they occur.

        

        4.        A good faith report from a staff member renders the staff member immune from discipline for making a report and is considered to have been made in the course of the staff member’s employment for purposes of M.G.L. c. 258.  As a result, the school district shall indemnify staff members from any cause of action arising out of a good faith report of harassment or the district’s subsequent actions or inaction in connection thereto.  

5.        If an instance of student to student harassment is reported to a staff member other than an administrator, the staff member must inform the Assistant Principal/House Master, or the Building Principal.

6.        If a situation involving a charge of staff member to student harassment is brought to the attention of any staff member, the staff member should notify the Building Principal or Assistant Superintendent immediately.  

7.        In a situation involving a charge of student to staff member sexual harassment the staff member should notify the Building Principal or Assistant Superintendent.

8.        In a situation involving a charge of staff member to staff member harassment the staff member should notify the Building Principal or the Assistant Superintendent.

                9.        Once a charge of harassment has been made, including charges of mental, emotional or physical harassment as well as threats to a person's safety or position in the school or work environment, the following course of action should be taken.

The Building Principal should investigate the charge through discussions with the individuals involved.  In situations involving allegations against a staff member, he/she should be informed of his/her rights to have a third party present at the time of the discussion.  In situations involving students the Principal should engage the appropriate classroom or special subject area teacher.  Parents will be informed of the situation and invited to participate in resolution discussions.  It is important that the situation be resolved as confidentially and as quickly as the circumstances permit.

If the harasser and the victim are willing to discuss the matter at resolution meeting in the presence of the Principal/designee or Assistant Superintendent, a supportive faculty member and/or parent should be included in the discussion.  During this discussion, the offending behavior should be described by the victim and administration, a request for a change in behavior should be made, and a promise should be made that the described behavior will stop.   If circumstances do not permit a face to face meeting the administration will present the victim’s position.  Follow-up verification procedures will be explained.  Failure to comply after a resolution meeting will result in appropriate discipline.  

10.        If after a resolution meeting with the involved parties, the Building Principal determines that further disciplinary action must be taken, the following could occur:

In instances involving student to student or student to staff member      harassment, the student may be subject to discipline including but not limited to counseling, suspension, and in appropriate cases expulsion.  

In instances involving staff member to student and staff member to staff member harassment, findings will be reported to the Superintendent of Schools for further action.  Personnel action may also be initiated at this point, consistent with the applicable law and collective bargaining agreement.  

In all cases a referral to law enforcement will be considered by the Principal or Superintendent based on the circumstances.  School officials will coordinate with the Police Department to identify a police liaison for harassment cases.  

             11.        Retaliation:

        Retaliation in any form against any person who has made or filed a complaint relating to harassment is forbidden.  If it occurs, it could be considered grounds for dismissal of staff personnel and/or removal from the educational setting for a student.  A referral to law enforcement may be made.

              12.         Confidentiality:

Reports of harassment should be kept completely confidential, consistent with necessary investigation procedures, with the goal of protecting the victim and stopping the behavior.

For further information about these guidelines or help with sexual harassment problems or any other form of harassment, consult:

______________________________________________

Harassment Coordinator, Natick Public Schools

        If the alleged harasser is responsible for conducting an investigation, the Superintendent or Committee shall designate an alternative Harassment Coordinate, who is ___________________.

        LEGAL REFERENCES

                1.        Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Section 703

                2.        Title IX of the 1972 U.S. Civil Rights Act.

Chapter 151C, Massachusetts General Laws

M.G.L. Chapter 76 § 5

M.G.L. Chapter 269 § 17, 18, 19

M.G.L. Chapter 71, §§82, 84

        

 Physical Restraint of Students

Maintaining an orderly, safe environment conducive to learning is an expectation of all staff members of the Natick Public Schools.  Further, students of the district are protected by law from the unreasonable use of physical restraint.

Physical restraint shall be used only in emergency situation after other less intrusive alternatives have failed or been deemed inappropriate, and with extreme caution.  School personnel shall use physical restraint with two goals in mind:

1.         To administer a physical restraint only when needed to protect a student and/or a member of the school community from immediate, serious, physical  harm; and

        2.          To prevent or minimize any harm to the student as a result of the use of                                      physical restraint.

The following definitions appear at 603CMR 46.02:

1.          Extended Restraint:  A physical restraint the duration of which is longer than 20 minutes.

2.          Physical escort:  Touching or holding a student without the use of force for the purpose of directing the student.

        3.          Physical restraint:  The use of bodily force to limit a student’s freedom of                             movement.

The use of mechanical or chemical restraint is prohibited unless explicitly authorized by a physician and approved in writing by the parent/guardian.  The use of seclusion restraint is prohibited in public education programs.

Mechanical restraint - The use of a physical device to restrict the movement of a student of the movement or normal function of a portion of his or her body.  A protective or stabilizing device ordered by a physician shall not be considered a mechanical restraint.

Seclusion restraint - Physically confining a student along in a room or limited space without access to school staff.  The use of “Time out” procedures during which a staff member remains accessible to the student shall not be considered “seclusion restraint”.

Chemical restraint - administration of medication for the purpose of restraint.

The Superintendent will develop written procedures identifying:

Appropriate responses to student behavior, that may require immediate intervention;

Methods of preventing student violence, self injurious behavior, and suicide, including de-escalation of potentially dangerous behavior occurring among groups of student or with an individual student.

Descriptions and explanations of the school’s method of physical restraint;

Descriptions of the school’s training and reporting requirements;

Procedures for receiving and investigating complaints.

These procedures shall be reviewed annually and provided to school staff and made available to parents of enrolled students.

Each building Principal will identify staff members to serve as a school-wide resource to assist in ensuring proper administration of physical restraint.  These staff members will participate in an in-depth training program in the use of physical restraint, which shall be at least sixteen (16) hours in length.

Only school personnel who have received training pursuant to 603CMR 46.00 shall administer physical restraint on students.  Whenever possible, the administration of physical restraint shall be administered in the presence of at least one adult who does not participate in the restraint.  A person administering physical restraint shall only use the amount of force necessary to protect the student from injury or harm.

In addition, a staff member will be trained regarding the school’s physical restraint policy.  The Principal will arrange training to occur in the first month of each school year, or for staff hired after the beginning of the school year, within a month of their employment.

Physical restraint is prohibited as a means of punishment, or as a response to destruction of property, disruption of school order, a student’s refusal to comply with a school rule or staff directive, or verbal threats that do not constitute a threat of imminent, serious physical harm to the student or others.

Any teacher or any employee or agent of the school committee shall not be precluded from using such reasonable force as is necessary to protect pupils, other persons or themselves from an assault by a pupil.

The program staff shall report the use of physical restraint that lasts longer than five minutes, or results in injury to a student or staff member.  The staff member shall inform the administration of the physical restraint as soon as possible, and by written report, no later than the next school day.  The Principal or director or his/her designee shall maintain an ongoing record of all reported instances of physical restraint, which, upon request, shall be made available to the Department of Education.

The Principal or the director of the program or his or her designee shall verbally inform the student’s parents or guardians of the restraint as soon as possible, and by written report postmarked no later than three (3) working days following the use of restraint.  The written report shall be provided in another language if the school department regularly provides a student with report cards or other necessary school-related information in language other than English.

When a restraint has resulted in serious injury to a student or program staff member or when an extended restraint has been administered, the program shall provide a copy of the required report to the Department of Education within five (5) school working days of the administration of the restraint.

In special circumstances waivers may be sought from parents either through the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process or from parents of students who present a high risk of frequent, dangerous behavior that may frequent the use of restraint.

ADOPTED:                        Natick School Committee - December 3, 2001

LEGAL REF.:                  603CMR 46.00

                                M.G.L. 71:37G

Physical Restraint Guidelines

The Natick Public Schools, in accordance with 603CMR 46.00, has determined that school staff will adhere to the following guidelines:

All school staff must receive annual orientation training with respect to the district’s restraint policy.  New staff must receive orientation training within the first month of their employment.  The principal shall direct the Crisis Intervention Team Leader within the school to provide the training to new staff.  The school must identify specific staff to serve as the school-wide resources (Crisis Intervention Team) to assist in ensuring proper administration of physical restraint.  These individuals must receive in-depth training with respect to restraint and implementation of regulations.

A physical restraint will be administered only when needed to protect a student and/or member of the school community from imminent, serious physical harm and when non-physical interventions would be ineffective.  The use of physical restraint is to prevent or minimize any harm to the student and/or other individual.

Physical restraint may not be used as a means of punishment or as response to property destruction, disruption of school order, refusal to comply with a school rule or staff directive, or verbal threats that do not constitute a threat of imminent, serious, physical harm.  Seclusion is prohibited.

All incidents of physical restraint must be reported to the principal or his/her designee immediately following the incident.

The principal or designee shall verbally report any physical restraint incident that lasts longer than five minutes in duration to the student’s parents as soon as possible following the incident.  In addition, the principal/designee shall report incidents (described in Item 6 and 7) by written report postmarked no later than 3 school working days of the incident in the language that is used for other reports to that student’s parents.  A copy of this report will be sent to the Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services.

The staff member shall report the use of physical restraint that lasts longer than 5 minutes or results in personal injury to the student or a staff member.  The staff member shall inform the administration of the physical restraint as soon as possible, and by written report no later than the next school day.  The principal or his/her designee shall maintain an ongoing record of all reported instances of physical restraint, which upon request, shall be made available to the Department of Education.  A copy of these reports will be forwarded to the Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services.

Any physical restraint incident that lasts longer than 20 minutes and/or that results in personal injury to the student must be reported to the DOE within 5 days of the incident.  A copy of the school’s record of physical restraints covering the 30-day period to the incident must be included.  A copy of these reports will be sent to the Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services.

Follow-up procedures for restraint include not only the reporting requirements set forth above, but also reviewing the incident with the student, staff and consideration of whether follow-up is appropriate for students who witnessed the incident.

Natick Public Schools Procedure for

       Physical Restraint Occurrence   2002

 


This procedure will be implemented in the event of a reported incident with a potential acting-out student to prevent possibility of escalating to crisis stage.  


Steps

Task

Person Responsible

Initial and Date

1

The staff member who encounters a potentially acting-out student will employ recommended preventative strategies to reduce the possibility of escalation to the crisis stage.

Staff Member

2

The staff member will notify the Principal/Designee of a potentially physically acting-out student.

Staff Member

3

The Crisis Intervention Team will be called to the incident using an established code word followed by a room number/location.

Principal/

Designee

4

Upon arrival, the Team Leader will assess the situation and determine if Non-Violent Physical Crisis Intervention is appropriate.

Team Leader

5

The Team Leaders will direct the team members involved in the actual restraint, as well as those who will assume support roles.

Team Leader

6

Immediately following the incident, the Crisis Intervention Team will meet to debrief and notify the Principal or Designee.  The Principal will immediately inform parents verbally of the incident.

Team Members

7

The Crisis Intervention Team will prepare and submit required written documentation to notify parents, Principal and Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services of physical restraint incidents that exceed 5 minutes in duration.  Written notification will be provided to parents postmarked no later than 3 school days from the incident.

Team Members

Principal

8

Any incident of physical restraint that lasts longer than 5 minutes and/or results in personal injury to student or staff member, shall be reported to the Principal as soon as possible and by written report no later than the next school day.  The Principal/Designee shall maintain an ongoing record of all reported instances of physical restraint, which upon request, shall be sent to the DOE.  A copy of these reports shall be sent to the Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services.

Team Members

Principal

                                                        

                                                                                        1 of 3.18

Physical Restraint Occurrence Continued

9

In the event of a restraint exceeding twenty (20) minutes and/or when the student is injured, documentation will be provided to DOE within 5 school days. This documentation will include a copy of the school’s record of physical restraints covering the 30-day period prior to the current incident.  Copies of documentation will be sent to the Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services.

Principal

10

The incident will be reviewed with the student and staff, and consideration will be given to whether follow-up is appropriate for students who witnessed the incident.

Team Members

                                                                                2 of 3.18

Copies of the Education Law and Regulations (603 CMR 23.00: Student Records) are available from the NPS Office of Pupil Services upon request.

The Natick Public Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or disability.