Knowledge Source Assessments (Responses)
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MName(s) What type of source is this?Name and/or type of eventDoes this event deal with actors and who holds the power?Does this event deal with structures and patterns of behavior larger than an individual actor?Does this event deal with strategies to change the food system?Does this event deal with values, justifications, and motivations?When did this take place?Where did this take place?Who was involved?Goals / purposeHow would someone know they could use or trust this?How should we keep track of what came out of this conversation or event, or how it is used by others?Name and/or type of information or artifact / knowledge resource / experience:Is this knowledge/experience about actors and who holds the power?Is this knowledge/experience about structures and patterns of behavior larger than an individual actor?Is this knowledge/experience about strategies to change the food system?Is this knowledge/experience about values, justifications, and motivations?Is there a date when this took place or was published?Where can this be found, or where did it take place?Who produced this or was involved in this?Who is or was the intended audience or who are/were the intended participants?Goals / purposeMethods / how would someone know they could trust this?How should we keep track of what this knowledge does as it circulates and is used?Engage an adequate range of perspectives and types of knowledgeTranslate between diverse perspectivesAddress conflicts across perspectivesGenerate useful information for those affected by the issues addressedInclude an adequate range of relevant stakeholders throughout the knowledge-creation processHelp users of this knowledge source learn from each otherAllow users of this knowledge source to put what they learn into actionConsider the larger context as necessaryComments or notes on these ratings:What do you think could or should be done with this source of knowledge?What has already been done?What is useful, meaningful, surprising, or a problem? Questions?What connections would you like to see made to other information/people/organizations?Cite as specifically as possible.Name of person or groupKey profile detailsDoes this person's work deal with actors and who holds the power?Does this person's work deal with structures and patterns of behavior larger than an individual actor?Does this person's work deal with strategies to change the food system?Does this person's work deal with values, justifications, and motivations?Dates relevant to the activities of this person or community being describedRelevant location(s) Related social networksWhy would someone want to know about this person or community?Methods / how would someone know they could trust knowledge shared by this person/group?How should we keep track of the interests highlighted in this profile?Engage an adequate range of perspectives and types of knowledgeAddress conflicts across perspectivesTranslate between diverse perspectivesGenerate useful information for those affected by the issues addressedHelp users of this knowledge source learn from each otherInclude an adequate range of relevant stakeholders throughout the knowledge-creation processAllow users of this knowledge source to put what they learn into actionConsider the larger context as necessaryWhat has been done with the knowledge you've shared?What do you think could or should be done with it?What have you found useful, meaningful, surprising, or a problem? Questions?What connections have you made (or would you make) to other information/people/organizations?
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vTahsha Event / conversationRebecca Paxton: Agriculture & Health: It's More Than Food (Edited) VideoVague ActorInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, LocationsCollaboration, Models and Examples, Goals and Evaluation, Theories of ChangeHealth and Safety, Sustainability, Local / Regional, Diversity and Food Culture, Ecology, Environment, and Land, PolicySeptember 2014 BOKU (University) AustriaPeter Shea, Rebecca L. Paxton Exploring the social and mental health benefits around agriculture and food production and people's relationship with nature beyond tangible things that result from food production, more specifically, community gardens, school farm programs, rehabilitation programs, programs for people with disabilities. It is a research project at BOKU university and does not make any specific claims, but rather talks about the researcher's thesis and examples. The outcome of the research and correlations between social, community and mental health as it relates to food production and agriculture. 3334 very well34 very well34 very wellThis is very effective for opening a discussion about a fairly new topic. People interested in mental health, physical well-being and social health would find some good examples to consider in how agriculture can affect these things. Interdisciplinary Research. Some research, but not enough. Meaningful. It's a new way to look at how agriculture can be used in different ways. Mental Health groups, Social programs, various health institutions, social workersUMN Institute for Advanced Study website, Bat of Minerva videos by Peter Shea (Austria Series 2014)
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4/3/2015 1:35:03TahshaPerson / communityKatharina Hagenhofer Student at BOKU in Austria interviewed by Peter Shea. She is studying farm succession outside the family and talks about future farmers, start up obstacles and programs to help beginning farmers. Vague Actor, Identified Actor, GovernanceInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge BuildingCollaboration, Models and Examples, Theories of Change2014Austria, farms, family farms Someone interested in the future of farming, decline of farmer population, start-up farms, young farmers, land access and succession as well as family farms. Currently researching topic at BOKU in Austria. Check up on research at BOKU. Connecting universities to farmers, family farmers that may be looking to preserve the future of the farm. Collaboration between old and young farmers through mutual learning experiences. "Town Hall" style discussions around farming topics, future farming. The value and possibilities of partnership to avoid consolidation of small farms into large agribusinesses. linking economics to social collaborations through land purchasing schemes and partnerships, protect small-holder farmers and promote sustainable and organic farming practices. universities, small and medium scale farmers, banks, realtors, lawyers, communities provides possible models for future farmers, community relationships and sustainable practices Encourage young people to farm, protecting the land from being swallowed up by large farm operations, promoting sustainable methods Research is in progress, YouTube video Round Table discussion with farm cooperatives and university students interested in farming, promote networking and grassroots movements. Lack of resources for small farmers, no equity, expensive start-up costsag universities and family farmers, farmer coops, banks, real estate, non-profits
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4/3/2015 17:06:57Phoebe WardPerson / communityRachel JendrzejewskiRachel Jendrzejewski is a multidisciplinary artist whose work includes the Stranger-Stranger Supper Series, which brought people together in roles they were not accustomed to. Stageless theater, if you will. Jendrzejewski talks about the performance of everyday life and the directions her work might take in the future. She also discusses the Stranger-Stranger Supper Series in the context of discourse surrounding food systems.Identified ActorInformation / Knowledge Building, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, LocationsCollaborationMarch 2013.Twin Cities Metro area.It appears to be anyone interested? But Jendrzejewski was particularly concerned with bringing business to restaurants whose business was obstructed by the construction of the Green Line. One proposed direction that the project could go in the future would be engagement with the actors within food systems, whether they be policymakers or farmers.Jendrzejewski presents an interesting perspective on the theatrical medium and on our own constructed identities; she proposes another way of discussing our food systems, one that is not generally considered.Jendrzejewski is mainly concerned with finding things out–she doesn't have an agenda one way or another. In a way, she's being very scientific in the way she investigates the intersections of identity and performance, which indicates a level of detachment from the results.I'm not entirely sure what is meant by this question, sorry. I think that we could keep track of Jendrzejewski's work simply by following her blog/keeping a finger on the pulse of the art scene in the Twin Cities.The entire purpose of the dinner series was to engage with multiple perspectives in a creative way.Jendrzejewski doesn't really discuss conflicts across perspectives in detail, except in brief allusions ("There was a climate change denier at the table…so things got a little tense.") and so perhaps this would be something to investigate further.Again, the supper series was intended to bring diverse perspectives together.The interview merely touches on this–it's more a summary of how the people involved reacted to the project.This was the main purpose of the project.The participants were only briefly touched on–mostly in examples of how the project worked, such as a description of how the restauranteurs got into the general theatrical atmosphere that the suppers created.Perhaps it would inspire users to reconsider the way they construct their own identity/structure their own dialogues with people holding other perspectives?Applications in food systems dialogue.Unknown at present.I think that a dialogue could be constructed around food systems that used this rather creative approach to discussion. It might shake things up a little.As fascinating as this was, I remain skeptical about the efficacy of performance art in making real change. That may just be the cynic in me.Connections to food systems participants and people from various walks of life who just want to investigate alternate perspectives.
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4/3/2015 17:20:30Phoebe WardEvent / conversationTalkChallenged Actor, Blamed Actor, Identified Actor, GovernanceInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations, Transportation, Delivery, and Distribution Networks, Global ScaleModels and Examples, Consumer Empowerment, Producer EmpowermentSustainability, Local / Regional, Diversity and Food Culture, Economic Development, Ecology, Environment, and Land, Equity and Justice, PolicyOctober 2011Nolte CenterWilliam Moseley, professor in the Department of Geography at Macalester College.

Connected to the Chinese, Libyan, Malian, and American governments, as well as the people of Mali and China.
It presents an alternate perspective on the Green Revolution(s).Moseley has a long history of academic involvement in Africa and the event he spoke at was sponsored by the Institute for Advanced Study, which concerns itself with the dissemination of various intellectual perspectives.Moseley is presumably still active in academia, so that could be one place to track what came out of this event; it might also be interesting to see what audience members thought of it, although that might be considerably more difficult.4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well34 very well34 very wellThe information gathered here could be used to rebut inflated claims made by Green Revolution proponents in the African continent.I am not aware of anything having been done on a large scale, but Moseley has a monthly blog on Al Jazeera about agriculture, the environment and development.I find it surprising that the Malian government, even with evidence that their agricultural efforts are generating mixed results at best, would continue on a path that is not necessarily optimal for the wellbeing of their people.Connections with Randel Hanson's discussion of the petrochemical industry and its effects on his own childhood agricultural landscape; connections to Ken Meter and his story of the disenfranchisement of the American farmer. Anyone who talks about corporate interests trumping concern for the individuals that stand in their path.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5NhgCduZkE
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4/5/2015 12:53:42TahshaPerson / communityGlenn Stone: Anthropology, GMOs and Small Farms YouTube video: Glenn Stone: Anthropology, GMOs and Small Farms (Edited)

He talks about positive and negative effects of GMOs and the biotech industry, skeptical of claims that biotech can feed the Third World. He uses India as an example of how more crops doesn't equal more food for the poor. He also discusses the role of research universities and biotech and the future of farming, briefly discussing small farms and alternative farming in America.
Challenged Actor, Blamed Actor, Identified ActorInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations, Global ScaleModels and Examples, Goals and Evaluation, Theories of Change1994 Flavorsaver tomato, 1999-2000 debates on GMOs, 2011 when interview took place India, America Research universities, Biotech companies, farmers, small farmers, Third World development organizations, USDA, NGOs Glenn Stone provides an equal balance of positive and negative effects of GMOs providing specific examples and a fair analysis of the role of biotech in the future of farming. Social scientists would be interested in the role of culture and place in relation to the acceptance or rejection of GMOs. Glenn has worked for research universities studying biotech in India first hand over the course of a decade. He has also experienced working in a biotech lab and can present arguments for both sides, for and against, GMO debates. Future studies and research in relation to specific locations and GMOs (the role of culture and social science as well). Presents the debate in a more complex version. Introduces the element of time and place in relation to whether GMOs are good or bad. First hand experience from conflicting sides of the GMO argument (lab, university, third world country) His most extensive research being in India, he presents his observation of the hunger situation there and how GMOs may work in the United States, but do not solve problems in hungry third world countries. Brings opposing sides of the debate together in an informative manner. Does a very good job of presenting motivations for all stakeholders and effects of biotech. The role of Social Science in Natural Science. I think a module on Social Sciences in the Natural Science world would be helpful. This relates to Bernhard Freyer's interview Bringing Social Sciences into Agriculture. It seems to be a fairly new topic gaining popularity in recent years. It is often difficult to bring natural and social elements into agreement on a hot topic like GMOs. Opposing sides usually feel quite strongly about their position on the topic and I think this interview is a bridge that can convince people to look at the subject in different ways. Bernhard Freyer, Social Science and Agriculture, University of Minnesota as a Research Institution (interdisciplinary research)
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4/14/2015 14:40:25TahshaPerson / communityBernhard Freyer Bat of Minerva Austria interview with Professor Freyer. He talks about bringing social science into agriculture and having a dialogue between natural and social sciences and how the sense-making is important to incorporate both successfully into a system. Vague Actor, Challenged ActorInformation / Knowledge BuildingCollaboration, Models and Examples, Theories of Change, Collaboration -- Dialogue / PartnershipSustainability, Sustainability -- Organics, Local / Regional, Diversity and Food Culture, Economic Development -- Ideals & Frameworks, Ecology, Environment, and Land -- Land & Environmental Management, Equity and Justice -- Access to Learning, religion and spiritualityInterview in 2014 and is a current topic of research. Austria at BOKU university is where the research is currently happening, but Prof. Freyer also taught at UMN. Farmers, Scientists, development organizationsA way to build a sustainable agricultural system from the bottom up, with a more holistic perspective involving farmers' lives and scientific research. Professor Freyer is educated in both natural and social science and has been studying ways to involve social components in implementation of development. Follow his research! Encourage collaborative research with the U. He goes in the field and asks people about their lives---very involved in getting the social aspects into agriculture. He is also a natural scientists so he can act as a bridge between the two sciences where heads normally butt. Again, social and natural science and perspectives from the people involved or that will be using the advances in sciences. This can be relevant to many different people across the globe because it is much more culturally focused--it allows for implementation to adapt to the communities directly. It's a great dialogue to bring natural scientists and farmers together. Evaluate if implementation continues to be successful after the initial period. If incorporating community-specific social practices and beliefs--are they continuing to use the system? This will determine if it is sustainable. It's being researched, so I am not sure.interdisciplinary action around agriculture--which is becoming a popular approach. The importance of liberal arts in STEM fields!! YES!!! The Glenn Stone interview, I think OXFAM's work is something to be noted
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4/14/2015 15:02:00TahshaPerson / communityTracey DeutschHistory, Gender and Capitalism in the food system. Bat of Minerva interview about how culture shapes our food system. The role of capitalism and women in attitudes around food. Gender explained through research regarding the life and influence of Julia Child. Identified Actor, Challenged Actor, GovernanceInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Information / Knowledge Building -- Marketing, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, LocationsModels and Examples, Consumer Empowerment -- Consumer Practices, Theories of ChangeHealth and Safety -- Nutrition, Diversity and Food Culture, Economic Development -- Jobs & Livelihoods, Economic Development -- Consumption Practices, Equity and Justice, Policy -- Government as Actor, gender dynamicsAmerican society, households, consumers, gender roles, government organizationUnited States Consumer society, women, government policy makers, capitalists, business men/womenTo understand the larger context of culture in our society and how the food system shapes and is shaped by culture. Professor who has studied these concepts and has been published in credible sources It would be great to connect the research from Tracey and the Julia Child Project to this video. Americans as consumers and the role of women in the food system historical, social and political as above mentionedThe role of women is especially useful since she talks a lot about the Julia Child ProjectThis is interesting because it brings GWSS and HIST into the social food system. A better understanding of who the actors are in the food system and how one might go about improving it. I am pretty sure there are some published documents regarding this research. Check with Tracey about the documents. The interdisciplinary nature--specific social sciences as they relate to agriculture including a historical perspective. I think as far as the role of women in the food system. Bill Moseley has talked about women in rice production in Mali. Rachel Schurman may have some information regarding the role of women in tea production in Tanzania (women in the factories, men in the fields). Perhaps Michael Goldman --he may have some stuff regarding India.
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4/14/2015 15:32:29Tahsha Person / communityDaniel BlockBat of Minerva interview regarding geography and mapping food access. He talks about food deserts and the map as a tool to communicate social disparities between socio-economic communities. He extends this into aesthetic aspects of food markets and consumer ideals. A great FOOD JUSTICE video. Identified Actor, Challenged Actor, Blamed ActorInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Information / Knowledge Building -- Marketing, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations, Transportation, Delivery, and Distribution Networks, Global ScaleModels and Examples, Goals and Evaluation, Theories of ChangeLocal / Regional, Diversity and Food Culture, Economic Development, Economic Development -- Ideals & Frameworks, Economic Development -- Consumption Practices, Equity and Justice, Equity and Justice -- Health Disparities, Equity and Justice -- Food Affordability, Equity and Justice -- Racial Disparities, Equity and Justice -- Spatial AccessInterview in March 2011. Chicago is a big one, U.S. neighborhoods, consumers, corporations, city planners, communities, A great way to study food justice and access, especially for poor communities. He is highly educated professor who has been studying these topics for years. I think it would be worthwhile to see if the population center has any interactive maps for this. Also the Common Table Fair Project could be a cool feature. There are social aspects connected to the idea of geographical placement. Human behavior, market planning. More like acknowledgement that geography can't answer everything Like stated above, addressing social aspects of food access and consumer behaviormaps as visual aids to address food access issues Incorporate Geography and Social Science and Marketing!This would be more of a supplemental information tool for addressing food access issuesVideo on YouTube. I am not sure what has been done with Daniel Blocks research, but he did mention it helping city planners. A GIS layer is a good tool for city planning and zoning regulations. I think transportation networks are important. Not just as how consumers get to the market, but how does product get to the market. One of the biggest problems I had working in the trucking industry was deliveries to inner city markets----truck routes are awful and unloading times are slow. I think there may be something that Humphrey School for Public Affairs may be doing with this, but am not sure. I know Tracey Deutsch has done work with Grocery Stores, but I am not sure how relevant that is to this.
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4/15/2015 9:17:22Phoebe WardKnowledge / experienceRed Rock Rural Water System
Dominic Jones (Manager)
Interview
Intricacies of the water system in rural Minnesota
Vague Actor, Identified Actor, Blamed Actor, GovernanceInstitutional StructureModels and ExamplesHealth and Safety, Sustainability -- Organics, Local / Regional, Ecology, Environment, and Land, Ecology, Environment, and Land -- Land & Environmental Management, Ecology, Environment, and Land -- Land Access, PolicyJuly 2012.Red Rock Rural Water System.Peter Shea
Gabrielle Orfield
Dominic Jones
Anyone interested in the intricacies of the rural water system.If that person wanted to know about how water systems are managed in areas of relative water scarcity, then this would be an excellent resource.Dominic Jones has worked for the rural water system for 19 years.I suppose this video could be cited in research papers?4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well1 not very well4 very well1 not very well4 very wellThis could be used to give people a greater awareness of how the rural water system works and what kind of conflicts arise between stakeholders.Unknown.Surprising that five to six square acres of land would suffice to protect water.Connections to farmers in the area (Batalden Smith & Smith?) and people studying agricultural systems over the past few decades.http://youtu.be/IQxsyUqUdGs
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4/24/2015 11:04:47Phoebe WardPerson / communityKate RobertsKate Roberts
Volunteer Coordinator
Cottonwood County
SHIP (State Health Improvement Program)
Vague Actor, Identified ActorGoals and Evaluation, Consumer Empowerment, Consumer Empowerment -- Consumer Practices, Collaboration -- Community, Collaboration -- Community Garden, Collaboration -- Dialogue / PartnershipFood Quality, Health and Safety -- Nutrition, Local / Regional, Diversity and Food Culture, Economic Development -- Jobs & Livelihoods, Equity and Justice -- Health Disparities, Equity and Justice -- Food Affordability, Equity and Justice -- Spatial Access, Policy, Cottonwood CountyJuly 2012Cottonwood CountySeniors
The food insecure
Community gardeners
Rural Minnesotans
Food security advocates
She works with many of the people that welfare programs are intended to help.Kate Roberts has firsthand experience working to feed disadvantaged groups.Unknown. Perhaps keeping an eye on the demographics of Cottonwood County.22333422Unknown.This video could be used to spread awareness about the complications of poverty in Cottonwood County and elsewhere.The information was interesting, but very fragmented. I was not always clear on what exactly Roberts and her fellow volunteers did to alleviate hunger in Cottonwood County–at least beyond the very general aspects of their mission.Any other interviews of people in Cottonwood County/other people who have had experiences with poverty in America or outside of it. A very broad range indeed.
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4/26/2015 22:43:47TahshaPerson / communityBill Brandt Bat of Minerva Interview with Bill Brandt: Family Farm and Local Food Identified Actor, Identified Actor -- Blamed ActorInformation / Knowledge Building, Information / Knowledge Building -- Marketing, Food Production, Processing, and PreparationCollaboration, Producer Empowerment, Theories of Change, Theories of Change -- Food Movement, Collaboration -- CommunitySustainability, Local / Regional, Economic Development, Economic Development -- Jobs & Livelihoods, Economic Development -- Creating Own Economy, Ecology, Environment, and Land, Ecology, Environment, and Land -- Land & Environmental Management, Equity and Justice, Equity and Justice -- Economic Opportunities, laborI believe this was 2011 or 2012Sioux Valley Township, Minnesota Local farmers, local communityIt helps bring to light the troubles that small farmers have today and how they feel they can build strong communities through localized agriculture. Local and regional government may be interested in the idea of bringing processing facilities to the community. He has years of farming experience and interaction with the community. It would be interesting to see how Bill's farm is doing now and if any of his ideas have progressed. Farming experience, embracing change to try to keep the farm going, encouraging his children's education It gives an account of how local farmers struggle and how they might be able to overcome obstacles through a strong local economy.The idea of bringing a processing plant to provide jobs as well as supplying institutions such as local schools involves the whole community. The strength of bringing minds together through co-ops. Competition from large agro operations squeezing out the small farmers. I believe just the interview with Peter Shea. I think there is a connection with the Katharina Hogenhofer video in regards to the aging farmer population, financial and land issues. I have heard about small farmers in developing countries starting processing facilities, but hadn't though much about localized processing plants. I wonder if this would stay local or if the goal of the operation would be to eventually scale up. Is it really local if they start shipping nationally or globally? Katharina Hagenhofer Bat of Minerva Austria video
Farmer's Markets in the Twin Cities
Real Food Movement on Campus
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4/27/2015 18:50:18TahshaPerson / communityTina RichardsonBat of Minerva Interview, Renting Land to Hmong Farmers Identified ActorInformation / Knowledge Building, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, LocationsProducer EmpowermentFood Quality, Food Quality -- Taste, Health and Safety -- Nutrition, Sustainability, Local / Regional, Diversity and Food CultureInterview I believe is 2011 Walnut Grove, MinnesotaThe Walnut Grove community including Hmong immigrants, children that go to Tina's school, parents of schoolchildren.It represents the dynamics of a changing community, immigrant influence, integration and cultural exchanges. In a small community it is easy to see the relationship of the immigrant population to the community because people are not able to "hide" in a way they would be able to in a densely populated urban area. It would be interesting to see how the operation is doing today. It would also be interesting to follow the children of some of the hmong farmers/gardeners and see what course they take in life. Tina is a landlord, gardener, teacher and community member and all of these things show a range of perspectives. I especially like how she gets around communication barriers and interacts with both children and parents as well as her ability to embrace new cultures and learn from each other. She learns a lot of new techniques and ways of using unfamiliar foods that were acquired from her interactions with the Hmong community. The importance of culture in food ways and how immigrants can change food ways of the community they enter. A great tool for bringing together cultures through agriculture.This is a very localized perspective, but yet an important one that can be relevant to other small communities. Bat of Minerva video on IAS. I think of the Hmong population that sell produce at Farmers' Markets around the city and find that a stronger effort to create a dialogue between Hmong producers and consumers could help build stronger ties to the community in an urban setting. She had mentioned that only one gardener produces for the market and I am curious where the Hmong farmers that produce for the urban farmer's markets live. The fact that the only grocery store in Walnut Grove is run by a Hmong family and that it was the schoolchildren that first approached their teacher (Tina) about farming on the land. I am interested in the demographics of this town. Like I mentioned, the Farmers' Markets as well as the Hmong market in Minneapolis.
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4/27/2015 19:18:24TahshaPerson / communityPsyche Williams-ForsonBat of Minerva Interview about African-American Food Ways Identified ActorInformation / Knowledge Building, Food Production, Processing, and PreparationDiversity and Food Culture2011 InterviewUnited States, Southern U.S. African-American and communities engaging with African-Americans To develop a personal history and empowerment of African-Americans.Psyche belongs to the African-American community and has experienced it firsthand. She has conducted interviews, researched pop and material culture and written many books on the subject. Future publications? Interviews, first hand experience, material culture and pop culture references and mediaDistinguishing the difference between "black" and African-American and how this changes perception of food. The impact of memories on food habits as well as differences in culture that affect food habits, and power dynamics between different groups.Provides unity and historical importance for the African-American community regarding food.Understanding the cultural divide and power related to food. Important part of African-American culture. There was a conference right around the time of the interview. The effect of memory on food ways. This is fascinating and is often overlooked. I think it relates a bit to the TIna Richards interview Renting Land to Hmong Farmers because it shows how a marginalized population develops and integrates a food culture into what is typically seen as the dominant community.

It also relates to Tracey Deutsch's History, Capitalism and Gender interview in regard to power dynamics around food.
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5/17/2015 17:42:47Phoebe WardPerson / communityWilliam MoseleyWilliam Moseley
Professor at Macalester College
Africanist
Discussion of his evolution from burned-out university graduate to Peace Corps volunteer to academic with a critical view of the development project.
Vague Actor, Identified Actor, Identified Actor -- Challenged Actor, Identified Actor -- Blamed Actor, Identified Actor -- GovernanceInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Locations, Transportation, Delivery, and Distribution NetworksCollaboration, Models and Examples, Theories of Change, Collaboration -- Community, Collaboration -- Dialogue / PartnershipEconomic Development, Economic Development -- Ideals & Frameworks, Equity and Justice1980s to present.Africa, the World Bank, Illinois, MinnesotaPeace Corps
Local African communities
Macalester College
Moseley provides a perspective grounded in both fieldwork and academiaMoseley has personal and applied experience with the development projectFollow Moseley's academic output and the ideological as well as practical changes made to official and unofficial Peace Corps policy44444434Moseley continues to critique the ideologies underpinning the development projectPush for a dialogue about the ethics and effectiveness of the current development paradigmSurprising that development specialists treat the locals as stupid children, although I suppose it shouldn't beExperts in farming in the United States and other countries, critics of development in its present form, critics of the African Green Revolution currently being proposed
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5/31/2015 12:16:09Phoebe WardPerson / communitySunny RuthchildSunny Ruthchild, owner of Merryweather Gardens. Sixty-six as of July 2012, Ruthchild is committed to spending the rest of her life as a sustainable, organic grower of produce and livestock. She lives in Walnut Grove, MN and speaks to the conditions there.Vague Actor, Identified Actor, Identified Actor -- Challenged Actor, Identified Actor -- Blamed ActorInstitutional Structure, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations, Transportation, Delivery, and Distribution Networks, Transportation, Delivery, and Distribution Networks -- Farm-to-___Collaboration, Producer Empowerment, Collaboration -- Dialogue / PartnershipFood Quality, Sustainability, Sustainability -- Organics, Local / Regional, Economic Development -- Jobs & Livelihoods, Economic Development -- Consumption Practices, Ecology, Environment, and Land, Equity and Justice -- Spatial AccessJuly 2012Merryweather Gardens
Walnut Grove
Minnesota
Any organic farming cooperative or organization devoted to more sustainable agricultural practices
Farmers in general
Horticulturalists, agronomists, ecologists, soil scientists, animal husbandry experts
Policymakers
Ruthchild brings well over sixty years of personal experience to the table, as well as an ironclad set of ideals clearly developed over the course of six decades. She has clear-cut views on what constitutes good, ethical farming. She is also incredibly knowledgeable about her small patch of southwestern Minnesota and unequivocal in her opinions about what needs to be done. This is a rare bird in a field often plagued by half-measures and indecisiveness.Experience!Follow the progress of farmers' markets and sustainable agriculture in southwestern Minnesota, along with the state of human health in the agricultural heartland of the state, which is one of Ruthchild's primary concerns.44444444Unknown at this time, but for the fact that Ruthchild continues her work with Merryweather Gardens.Ruthchild puts forth several non-toxic pest control solutions in particular that might be of interest to farmers, as well as outlines a personal philosophy on farming that differs in subtle but important ways from the predominant paradigm of commercial agriculture that we are more used to.Meaningful that she speaks of "not being in control." She suggests that city life gives an illusion of control but that the farmer has no such illusions. It would seem that many of the ills of our current era stem from that misguided belief that we have power over things much too large for us to hold onto–the climate being the most spectacular example.Ken Meter, on the American Third World
Harry Baulisch and Kate Roberts, on hunger in rural Minnesota
William Moseley, on food in Africa
Ryan Batalden, on organic farming in rural Minnesota
Justin and Kathleen Batalden Smith, on commercial ventures in the country
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6/7/2015 19:51:49Phoebe WardEvent / conversationFinancialization, Food Pricing, and Speculation – a presentation by Steve Suppan (Full)Identified Actor -- Blamed ActorInstitutional Structure, Global ScaleModels and Examples, Goals and EvaluationEconomic Development -- Jobs & Livelihoods, Economic Development -- Ideals & Frameworks, Policy, Policy -- Government as ActorNovember 17, 2011Institute for Advanced StudySteve Suppan
Institute for Advanced Study
Rachel Schurman
K. Valentine Cadieux
To discuss abundance and scarcity and how both of these states of being are not only the products of random environmental conditions but also social, economic, and cultural forces.Steve Suppan has built his career as a senior policy analyst who studies the issues surrounding the current economic system. The fact that he backs his assertions up with the words of other eminent economists and policymakers and provides a source list at the end of the presentation helps, too.Tracking the changes made to US and international economic policy might be one step. The other two might be to track the opposing forces to business as usual and what they're pushing for and to find out what Steve Suppan has written since this talk.4 very well4 very well3334 very well34 very wellPerhaps it's just my inexperience with economics speaking, but I still found this talk rather confusing.This was, despite its confusing use of economic terminology, an absolutely fascinating talk. Someone with more experience with these frameworks might come to an even more nuanced conclusion about the current state of economic affairs than I did. It certainly highlights the rampant corruption and mismanagement of the world economy in stunning detail.Unknown at this time.Surprising that so many economists working together could not figure out that their methods are not working. Perhaps meaningful in that it illuminates a persistent problem in the modern world–the delusion that we are now inherently rational actors. Obviously if these things can happen we are still as dogmatic as any theologian in the early Middle Ages.Connections to William Moseley and his studies of food in Africa; connections to Ken Meter and his studies of poverty in rural America.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2cZ8loYWIOk
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7/27/2015 9:42:40TahshaPerson / communityFeeding the World: American Universities and the Changing Discourses of Food How we talk about feeding the world series. Speakers Maggi Adamek, Clare Hinrichs, Richard Wilk discuss the role of land grant universities in feeding the world. Topics include: definition and history of the land grant university, different perspectives of different land-grant universities, interdisciplinary nature around food studies and the divisions within the university, the local versus global food movements and how land grants are involved. Identified Actor, Identified Actor -- GovernanceInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Locations, Global ScaleCollaboration, Models and Examples, Theories of Change, Theories of Change -- Food Movement, Collaboration -- Dialogue / PartnershipSustainability, Local / Regional, Economic Development, Economic Development -- Jobs & Livelihoods, Economic Development -- Ideals & Frameworks, Economic Development -- Creating Own Economy, Ecology, Environment, and Land -- Land & Environmental Management, Equity and Justice -- Economic Opportunities, Policy, Policy -- Government as ActorMarch 3-5, 2011; 1930s-2000sUniversity of Minnesota, Cornell University; Iowa State; Penn State, Indiana StateDr. Maggi Adamek, Businesswoman (Terra Somma), Dr. Clare Hinrichs, Rural Sociologist; Dr. Richard Wilk, AnthropologistUseful information on how the food studies system could be structured within the university, especially with funding challenges. Defining and understanding the role of land grant universities in the food system. All speakers have Ph.Ds and have worked for land grant universities and are involved in food system related activities. Comparison of the goals and missions of the various land grant universities and how the department is structured. For example, the U of M has just added a Food Systems Major. Three speakers from 3 different universities with different credentials, primarily focused on the social sciences. The conflict between global food systems and economy versus local movements and livelihoods. The divide seems to exist between social and natural sciences. Realist versus Idealist ideology and the possible options with the way the food system is structured. Perspectives from different land grant universities and what issues are of importance. Universities can learn from each other--ideas for restructuring, managing funding and setting appropriate goals. Land grants have the ability to conduct research. The role of the land grant in the larger food system. A symposium at the University of Minnesota, video on IAS website. The tension between Maggi and Clare. Maggi definitely presents herself as a businesswoman, whereas Clare, being people-oriented has concerns with the social aspects of individuals and groups. I find this tension to be representative of the divisions within the university itself. Institute for the Environment and the new Food Studies Major (although I am unsure of the department or college that falls in)
19
7/30/2015 14:54:36Tahsha LePagePerson / communityFeeding the World: "Making Food" Turning Commodities into Meals This discussion moderated by Tracey Deutsch, University of Minnesota History & Gender Studies,revolves around alternative food networks, what we look at as food and it's health and cultural importance. Issues arise around race, class, political, or anti-political, action in regard to agribusiness and local food movements as well as the disregard for underground food provisioning networks. Panelists include: Steve Striffler, University of New Orleans focusing on the need for political structure within local food movements; Psyche Williams-Forson, University of Maryland discussing alternative food networks, underground food provisioning with attention to the role of race and class in AFNs; Kim Robien, University of Minnesota represents Public Health nutrition discussing the importance of the health of food and the environment within communities. The Q&A presents topics such as macro and micro level planning, home economics and consumer education. Identified Actor, Identified Actor -- Challenged Actor, Identified Actor -- GovernanceInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations, Transportation, Delivery, and Distribution Networks, local community Collaboration, Models and Examples, Goals and Evaluation, Consumer Empowerment, Consumer Empowerment -- Consumer Practices, Theories of Change, Theories of Change -- Food Movement, Collaboration -- Community, Collaboration -- Dialogue / PartnershipHealth and Safety -- Nutrition, Sustainability, Local / Regional, Diversity and Food Culture, Equity and Justice, Equity and Justice -- Food Affordability, Equity and Justice -- Racial Disparities, Equity and Justice -- Access to Learning, Equity and Justice -- Spatial Access, PolicyMarch 3-5, 2011 University of Minnesota on location, Prince George County Maryland; New Orleans To gain knowledge on all of the ways in which people acquire food and the factors that lead to these decisions in order to better manage food accessibility, health and affordability. Professors in their respective fields share their knowledge of their own research and observations. Have there been improvements in addressing these issues in recent years? How have the issues changed? The panel brings together different disciplines presenting insight on how food issues are addressed. Attention is given to the debate between the global and the local, big agribusiness and local food movements. Conflict between macro and micro level changes and how to address both sides of the issue. Racial inequality as well as class conflicts are also discussed. Merging of the different disciplines is seen with respect to healthy food also including cultural values and social well-being.Creates a meeting point for action. How can these different disciplines come together to build a greater movement that addresses both the here and now and long term goals? How can the marginal societies be brought into discussions of macro-level problems? The panel creates a platform to bring together various issues and open discussion for how these different disciplines intersect. Macro-level change: How can it be more inclusive? In the meantime, what micro-level changes can improve the daily lives of individuals. A food conference in 2011 and posting on IAS website. This could be used as a foundation for the new Food Studies Major curriculum. The enlightening comment in this video was when Psyche discusses the exclusion of the marginal societies in discussions of macro-level changes in the food system. While this seemed obvious to me, it had never been presented in a simple and straightforward manner. The fact that she presented to a room full of white people further enforced this sort of racial separation. I also find Steve's comments on the anti-political movements to be a good point. I tend to support these types of movements, but his description of these groups having no structure is a valid point. Interestingly, the occupy movement started a few months after this conference and received much of the same criticism. Big fuss, no structure. As a side note, the mention at the end of Wheaties is intriguing, because so often people refer to Wheaties, but I never actually see anyone buying or eating Wheaties. I think anyone wishing to make macro-level changes needs to be a traveler. There needs to be some connection to all realms of society and culture. It seems to make more sense to identify the main macro-level similarities between these groups that could be applied, and allow the rest to be regional and local to fit the cultural context.
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8/6/2015 9:47:29Tahsha LePageEvent / conversationFeeding the World Series: How We Might Talk with Each Other about Food Abundance and Scarcity in New and Powerful Ways. Identified Actor, Identified Actor -- Challenged ActorInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Locations, Global ScaleCollaboration, Collaboration -- Community, Collaboration -- Dialogue / partnership, Theories of ChangeEconomic Development -- Ideals & Frameworks, Equity and Justice -- Access to Learning, PolicyMarch 5, 2011 University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Institute for Advanced Study, Facilitator: Jay Bell (Associate dean of academic programs and faculty affairs, CFANS, U of M)
Panelists: Jeffrey Pilcher (History, U of M) and Daniel Block (Geography, Chicago State University)
Listeners: Rachel Schurman (Sociology, U of M), Elton Mykerezi (Applied Economics, U of M), and Randel Hanson (Geography, U of M-Duluth)
This discussion talks about how the University can change to better address the issues around feeding people. This can be local or global scale and focused on the relationship to the community, world, funding partners and the like. Ideas for how to think about the University's role is important and what exactly the goal of the University is when it comes to dealing with food insecurity and the future of the food system. As a collaboration of different disciplines and audience comments, there is a range of perspectives. The group also acknowledges those that are missing from the conversation that should, perhaps, be included. How has the structure of the university and policy changed to better meet the goals around food? 334 very well4 very well34 very well34 very wellFollowing the university structure. How have the disciplines been working together on these issues? Have there been changes in the way interdisciplinary studies operates. I think HECUA is a great example to follow to evaluate outcomes of these types of projects. HECUA, Food Systems Major new to the U What I find to be a problem often mentioned is the shortage of funding, or the need for finding new sources of funding. This can be both a blessing or a curse in my opinion because it forces the university to be creative in the funding process and can spark new collaborations on research that have the potential to bring in more disciplines and be more holistic. At the same time, the type of funders can be controversial and there is the potential to alienate certain disciplines that do not directly benefit from certain fields of study (or more so that they don't see the benefit in certain fields of study). I would like to see more information on the Food Systems Major, because I think that it is, or should be, interdisciplinary by nature, but I don't know much about the requirements because it emerged too late for me to declare it as a major. https://www.cfans.umn.edu/academics/majors-minors/food-systems
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8/20/2015 14:39:22Tahsha LePagePerson / communityValentine CadieuxBat of Minerva
August 10, 2011
Reflections on landscape perceptions and decisions (video title)
Vague Actor, Identified Actor -- Challenged ActorInstitutional Structure, Locations, Global ScaleTheories of ChangeSustainability, Local / Regional, Ecology, Environment, and Land, Equity and Justice -- Access to Learning, Equity and Justice -- Spatial Accessaugust 2011U of M
New England
Iowa
SE Minnesota
New Zealand
students, community members, faculty, geographersTo gain an understanding of different environments in order to understand the effects of our "ideal" landscape. I think this is a great segue/segway into thinking about environmental policy and possible ramifications of our actions. Many of the observations are self-reflective, allowing for personal experience and reflection. The nature of the interview is thought invoking. Where do we see projects like this today? What happened with the Geowall? hit the streets! You see so many TV shows that grab random people from the streets. This could be a great experiment. Also---introduce this photograph story-telling method into classrooms, community events, farmers markets--like a traveling Geowall. Geowall website with a feature photo every week? Possible feature on the site? Include various groups of people. It allows for people to compare and contrast their thoughts with one another. There was a website where you could take a quiz ranking the importance of global issues and it would match you up with someone else anywhere in the world that had the same views as you. This isn't the right quiz, but it's similar http://www.pewglobal.org/interactives/global-opportunity-quiz/ Again, this is a reflective piece, see above. Open the door for negotiation and conflict resolution, broader and more thoughtful analysis of environmental issues It's a fun way to encourage thought outside of your comfort zone I think this Geowall concept has a great potential to go fartherAs an example the interview talks about the ripple effect---how positive activism can help locally but hurt globally (New England forest protection leads the companies to go destroy the Amazon Rainforests) I am not sureA website, a traveling wall, this should go to conferences of all sorts This would be great for environmental policy makers. It would be a good presentation for UN conferences, FAO, Dept of Ag etc.
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9/23/2015 20:43:37Phoebe WardEvent / conversationDesigning Foodsheds: Ways of Thinking and Talking About Producing FoodIdentified ActorInstitutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, LocationsCollaboration -- Dialogue / partnership, Consumer Empowerment, Producer Empowerment, Theories of ChangeEquity and Justice -- Food Affordability, Policy3.04.2011125 Nolte Center for Continuing EducationMaggi Adamek (Terra Soma Consulting Services)
Don Wyse (Agronomy and Plant Genetics, U of M)
Erin Meier (SE Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, U of M)
Clare Hinrichs (Rural Sociology, Pennsylvania State University)
Bernhard Freyer (Minnesota Institute of Sustainable Agriculture; University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Vienna)
An investigation of how disciplines can come together to have conversations about feeding the world, what that means, how one might go about doing it, and what might be problematic about it.These are all people who have devoted their lives to the study of the food system, and they look at their subject with a correspondingly critical eye.It would be interesting to know if any of the participants published articles, books, or research papers regarding the subjects they discussed at this panel.4 very well4 very well4 very well324 very well4 very well4 very wellVery interesting discussion, but it wandered at times.This could be used as a jumping-off point for further discussions about the foodshed and what it truly means to feed the world.Unknown at present.Useful–a cross-disciplinary discussion of food, feeding, and conceptions of altruistic endeavors as they relate to world nutrition.
Meaningful–the sheer variety of speakers present at the panel. Very rare and thus very useful at generating frank and intellectually rigorous discussion.
Surprising–how many people in a wide variety of disciplines find the dominant feeding the world discourse at least mildly troublesome.
A problem–the vague and often overly abstract way that all of this was presented.
Ken Meter: on the American Third World
William Moseley's talks on the Green Revolution as it relates to Africa
Sunny Ruthchild as an organic farmer in southwestern Minnesota
Kathleen Batalden Smith and Justin Smith
Ryan Batalden
https://youtu.be/8GbBbuW7JgU
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9/23/2015 20:57:03Phoebe WardPerson / communityRyan and Tiffany BataldenIdentified ActorInstitutional Structure, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations, Transportation, Delivery, and Distribution NetworksProducer EmpowermentFood Quality, Sustainability, Local / Regional, Diversity and Food Culture, Economic Development, Ecology, Environment, and Land, Ecology, Environment, and Land -- Land AccessThe past fifteen or so years.Southwestern Minnesota.Organic and sustainable farmers
Prospective farmers
People interested in the local food system
People with historical ties to farming communities
An example of a multi-generational organic farming family.Ryan Batalden is from a family that has farmed organically for decades.The Bataldens still operate their farm and also continue to sell their products to consumers here in Minnesota and across the globe.33244243Unknown at present.This could be used as a teaching tool for young farmers
It could be used as a primary source in a class about the organic farming system
It could be used as a primary source in a class about the farming system in general
Useful advice on how to become an organic farmer
Surprising that the commitment was more to sustainability than organic status
Meaningful in that the descriptions of agrarian rhythms resonated with historical records of the same
Ken Meter: on the American Third World
Sunny Ruthchild
Kathleen and Justin Batalden Smith
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9/25/2015 16:27:24Phoebe WardEvent / conversationNeoliberal Policy Reform, Rural LIvelihoods, and Urban Food Security in West Africa: A Comparative Study of the Gambia, Côte d'Ivoire, and MaliInstitutional Structure, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations, Global ScaleCollaboration -- Community, Models and Examples, Producer EmpowermentLocal / Regional, Economic Development, Green RevolutionApril 13, 2015Crosby Seminar Room, 240 NorthropWilliam Moseley (Geography)
Tracey Deutsch (History)
Emily Hoover (Horticulture)
Rachel Schurman (Sociology)
Explains in great detail some of the root causes of the tremendous upheaval in West Africa during the 2007-08 food crisis.

Provides an understanding of why certain neoliberal economic policies cause more harm than good.

Brings multiple disciplinary areas to the same discussion table.

A personal account of one scholar's involvement with a little-understood part of the world (at least from an American perspective–obviously West Africans understand themselves very well).
This event was convened by members of the University of Minnesota. It was a project of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Group in Food Studies, which "seeks to realize the unique potential of the land-grant university to enable dialogue and collaboration among scholars working with issues around food and agriculture from disparate disciplinary perspectives." It has a grounding in solid academic work, and scholars from multiple disciplines provided comment at the talk.Would be interesting to know if Professor Moseley has gone back to West Africa since the date of the talk (2013).4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well24 very wellThis could be a resource for a class about West Africa, the Green Revolution, neoliberal economic policies, or neocolonialism.

This could be used as a rhetorical tool in arguing against further shortsighted neoliberal economic interventions in West Africa.
Unknown at present.It was useful to understand how neoliberal economic policy shaped the course of events in West Africa.

I found it meaningful also that someone took the time and energy to tell another side of the story–it is important to note here that Moseley is fiercely passionate about representing the West African people as intelligent, informed agents of their own destiny, rather than the stupid peasants the extension service has a tendency to view them as.
Connections to Moseley's other talks on the Green Revolution.

Connections to other analysts of the world financial system like Steve Suppan.

Connections to any organizations that promote, or claim to promote, the wellbeing of the people of Third World countries.
Currently only on IAS at http://ias.umn.edu/2015/04/13/moseley/.
25
9/28/2015 9:08:34Phoebe WardPerson / communityWilliam Moseley
William Moseley, Africanist professor of Geography at Macalester College, talks about his work in Botswana.
Identified Actor, Identified Actor -- Challenged Actor
Institutional Structure, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations, Transportation, Delivery, and Distribution Networks, Global Scale
Collaboration, Producer Empowerment, Theories of Change
Local / Regional, Diversity and Food Culture, Economic Development, Equity and Justice
June 2012 was when the interview happened.
Botswana.
Female farmers in Botswana.
Rural extension programs operating in Africa.
Moseley provides a counter-narrative to the one presented by agricultural extension services and institutions such as the World Bank, which treat a Green Revolution in Africa as inevitable and desirable. Moseley contends that they simply didn't think this through and that their actions could lead to grief rather than greenery in the areas they are seeking to help.
Moseley has a connection with Africa stretching back over twenty years, and his care for the people of the region comes through in how he talks about their welfare.
Moseley keeps a blog on Al-Jazeera, and, like all academics, he publishes papers on the topics of his interest.
44444424
Moseley continues to advocate for a more nuanced Green Revolution in Africa, one that incorporates more of the relevant stakeholders; he also writes regularly in Al-Jazeera, as mentioned before.
This could be used as a source in a class about gender dynamics in West Africa, the interaction between state and individual, the role of governmental bodies in twentieth and twenty-first century agricultural projects, or neocolonialism.
I found it surprising that even now, aid workers are condescending to the people they set out to save.
Richard Wilk, professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies, who has similarly close ties with the people he works with and similarly strong opinions on how many Westerners treat their knowledge systems.
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9/29/2015 9:46:30Phoebe WardEvent / conversation
Feeding the World: What Do People In Other Disciplines Seem To Know When They Talk About Food?
Identified Actor, Identified Actor -- Challenged Actor
Institutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations, Global Scale
Collaboration, Collaboration -- Dialogue / partnership, Models and Examples, Goals and Evaluation, Producer Empowerment, Theories of Change
Diversity and Food Culture, Economic Development, Equity and Justice
Friday, March 4, 2011125 Nolte Center
Valentine Cadieux (Geography, U of M)
Richard Wilk (Anthropology and Gender Studies, Indiana University)
Lisa Heldke (Philosophy, Gustavus Adolphus College)
Ben Senauer (Department of Applied Economics, U of M)
Jim Harkness (Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy)
Each of the panelists has personal experience with the work of food and food systems, and they each have their own story to tell.
The scholars on the panel have firsthand experience with the food system and the rhetorical and analytical tools to process what they have witnessed.
It would be interesting to know what scholarly work has been done by these academics since the time of the panel.
4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well
This could be used as a source for research about transdisciplinarity and the food system.
Unknown at present, although Valentine Cadieux has continued her work on the study of the food system.
Harkness is right–where are the representatives from industry in this discussion?
Connections to a one-on-one interview with Richard Wilk.
Steve Suppan's talk about the modern financial market.
William Moseley's talks about the Green Revolution.
http://ias.umn.edu/2011/03/05/feeding-the-world/
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10/2/2015 21:09:55Phoebe WardPerson / communityRandel Hanson
Randel Hanson is a professor of Geography at the University of Minnesota, Duluth, where he is an expert on food systems planning and foodshed analysis. He is a leader in local foods issues in Duluth, convening the Superior Grown Food Summit on November 14, 2009 and is chairing the Zeppa Foundation’s Green Jobs Action Planning Committee on Food Localization. He is spearheading curricular and research initiatives around sustainable agriculture at UMD, including the uses of the former NE Agricultural Extension Farm, orchard and historical records as a laboratory for teaching and learning about food systems past, present and future.
Vague Actor
Institutional Structure, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations
Theories of Change, Collaboration -- Community
Food Quality, Sustainability, Local / Regional, Diversity and Food Culture, Economic Development, Ecology, Environment, and Land
October 5, 2012.Duluth.
Local Duluth farmers.
University of Minnesota agricultural students.
Prospective Minnesota farmers.
Historians.
Organic farmers.
Zeppa Foundation.
NE Agricultural Extension Farm.
University of Minnesota - Duluth.
Randel Hanson has clear memories of a childhood changed by industrial agriculture.
He has worked for many years to revive the culture of organic farming in the Duluth area.
He also advocates very strongly for a movement away from large-scale agricultural practices.
Randel Hanson has literally decades of experience with the agricultural system and its discontents in America. He is also a professor of Geography at the University of Minnesota. Furthermore, he witnessed the postwar agrochemical shift firsthand.
Randel Hanson has given several other talks, including several with the IAS. The issues he describes also continue to be pertinent to life in Duluth, Minnesota, and America at large. There is no shortage of press, academic musing, polemic, and film about the issue of agriculture.
33333224
Unknown at present; presumably Randel Hanson teaches similar concepts to his students, and he's given several talks. He also works for the Zeppa Foundation's Green Jobs Action Planning Committee on Food Localization.
This could be a primary source for a history of the agricultural system.
A primary source on a postwar rural childhood transformed by the greater paradigmatic shifts in the agricultural system.
An example of a professor engaging in activism–some kind of exemplar for other would be scholar-activists.
Surprising AND problematic that many people in rural areas apparently die of cancer–yikes!
Connections to the Bataldens, Batalden Smiths, and Ruthchild as organic farmers.
Connections to the Feeding the World Symposium.
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10/22/2015 9:57:58Phoebe WardPerson / communityTerese Hall
Terese Hall
Farmer
Mother of five
Owner of a grass-fed meat business
Identified Actor
Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Locations
Collaboration
Food Quality, Local / Regional
October 2012.Southwest Minnesota.
Ryan Batalden, Kathleen Batalden Smith and Justin Smith
Terese Hall presents a unique perspective on small farms in Minnesota, and most of her sons went to technical colleges to learn hands-on skills that they now employ in their careers. A strong belief that your career should be something you love. A perspective on the 2006 tornado that carved a swathe through Southwest Minnesota.
Terese Hall and her husband have farmed their land for decades and have a lot of experience as farmers and raisers of beef cattle.
Halls Across the Prairie is their family-owned business, and they have contact information posted on the website.
32234223
The Halls continue to operate their farm, but aside from that I don't know.
This could be used in classes about the state of rural American agriculture today, or as a primary source in the study of rural livelihoods.
Useful to know more about the lives of rural farmers. Surprising–the union of the technical and the agricultural. Meaningful–that Terese Hall believes so strongly in following your passion.
Other organic farmers (Sunny Ruthchild, the Bataldens and the Batalden Smiths, etc.) .Other tradesmen and women (Dominic Jones).
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10/22/2015 10:31:07Phoebe WardEvent / conversationNick Cullather
Vague Actor, Identified Actor, Identified Actor -- Challenged Actor, Identified Actor -- Blamed Actor, Identified Actor -- Governance
Institutional Structure, Food Production, Processing, and Preparation, Global Scale
Models and Examples, Producer Empowerment, Theories of Change
Economic Development -- Jobs & Livelihoods, Equity and Justice -- Food Affordability, Equity and Justice -- Economic Opportunities, Policy, Policy -- Government as Actor
February 18, 2011
Institute for Advanced Study
Nick Cullather, Professor of History at Indiana University.
Various and sundry governments.
Farmers.
A whole flock of economists.
It provides a unique and little-voiced perspective on the 2008 Global Food Crisis.
Nick Cullather specializes in American foreign relations particularly as regards the history of intelligence, development, and nation-building.
It would be interesting to see if Cullather has written any more books and if the discourse surrounding food crises has changed at all following this 2011 talk.
4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well34 very well
This could act as a very effective rebuttal to those elements within the food security discourse who assert in the face of all evidence to the contrary that food prices are too high and that is the problem. It might also be a useful text for a class on the world economy or on the history of United States foreign policy. It could also be a source for a project on the globalized food system.
Unknown at present, but Cullather is a writer of books in addition to being a giver of talks; perhaps in the future he will write more on this subject.
Surprising that low food prices are the problem and not high ones; useful to know the historical mechanisms behind the food scarcity discourse; meaningful that politics can so profoundly impact the price of bread.
Connections with Ken Meter (the plight of the farmer)
Connections with William Moseley (Green Revolution discourse)
http://ias.umn.edu/2011/02/18/cullather/ (at present; will provide a new URL when it's uploaded to the YouTube site.
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10/23/2015 16:10:56Phoebe WardEvent / conversation
Marginalizing Access to the Sustainable Food System: Talk by Camille Tuason Mata
Identified Actor
Institutional Structure, Information / Knowledge Building, Transportation, Delivery, and Distribution Networks
Consumer Empowerment, Theories of Change -- Food Movement
Diversity and Food Culture, Equity and Justice
October 13, 2010
Institute for Advanced Study
Camille Tuason Mata, freelance consultant and writer
Ann Waltner, founding director of IAS
Environment, Culture, and Sustainability Quadrant
Tuason Mata lays bare the underlying reasons for the overwhelming whiteness of the alternative food movement.
Tuason Mata engaged in firsthand observation of how minorities interacted with alternative food spaces; she drew on previous case studies on unequal access to food.
It would be interesting to know if Tuason Mata continues her studies in social justice as it pertains to the alternative food movement.
4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well4 very well34 very well
Further study of the racial dynamics of the alternative food movement would be recommended.
Tuason Mata now works as Community Planner for the ECOPlanning Institute, and continues to advocate for a more inclusive model of sustainability.
I found it meaningful to learn that many minority groups don't buy from farmer's markets because the prices are simply too high and their wages are on average too low.
Connections to people who actually sell at farmer's markets–the Bataldens and Batalden Smiths, Sunny Ruthchild, etc.
http://ias.umn.edu/2010/10/13/camille-tuason-mata/
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