CTC_Qualified Electives Course Listing
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Note: this is a listing of courses that are pre-approved for CTC credit. Other courses, including from Brown University, may be eligible but will require CTC Coordinator approval
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To request credit for courses not listed, including prior to 2017-18, contact the CTC Coordinator
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Course number
Subject/Dept.TermCreditsCourse titleFaculty Note
Course description
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CTC-1000Computation Technology and CultureFall3Introduction to ComputationMattia CasalegnoCTC requirement
Introduction to Computation focuses on computational techniques, methods, and ideas in the context of art and design. Studio projects first center on the design of algorithms then shift to involve computer programming and scripting. Critical attention is given to code as a body of crafted text with significant aesthetic, philosophical, and social dimensions, as well as the tension, conflict, and potential possible when computation generates, informs, or interacts with drawings, materials, forms, and spaces. Historical and contemporary works of computational art and design will be presented and assigned for analysis. This course is open to students of all majors and is designed for those with little or no experience in programming. In order to conduct work in this course, students will need a laptop computer. This course fulfills one of two core studio requirements for CTC Concentration.
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CTC-1000Computation Technology and CultureSpring 3Introduction to ComputationChris NovelloCTC requirement
Introduction to Computation focuses on computational techniques, methods, and ideas in the context of art and design. Studio projects first center on the design of algorithms then shift to involve computer programming and scripting. Critical attention is given to code as a body of crafted text with significant aesthetic, philosophical, and social dimensions, as well as the tension, conflict, and potential possible when computation generates, informs, or interacts with drawings, materials, forms, and spaces. Historical and contemporary works of computational art and design will be presented and assigned for analysis. This course is open to students of all majors and is designed for those with little or no experience in programming. In order to conduct work in this course, students will need a laptop computer. This course fulfills one of two core studio requirements for CTC Concentration.
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CTC-1000Computation Technology and CultureWintersession3Introduction to ComputationMattia CasalegnoCTC requirement
Introduction to Computation focuses on computational techniques, methods, and ideas in the context of art and design. Studio projects first center on the design of algorithms then shift to involve computer programming and scripting. Critical attention is given to code as a body of crafted text with significant aesthetic, philosophical, and social dimensions, as well as the tension, conflict, and potential possible when computation generates, informs, or interacts with drawings, materials, forms, and spaces. Historical and contemporary works of computational art and design will be presented and assigned for analysis. This course is open to students of all majors and is designed for those with little or no experience in programming. In order to conduct work in this course, students will need a laptop computer. This course fulfills one of two core studio requirements for CTC Concentration.
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CTC-2000Computation Technology and CultureFall3Ambient Interfaces: Activated ObjectsAlejandro BorsaniCTC elective
This course is a practical and conceptual exploration into electronic sensors, processors and actuators in the context of interactive art and design. Students will turn everyday objects into "ambient interfaces" or "responsive systems" that respond to the conditions of the human body, data networks, and the environment. Contemporary works of art and design - from kinetic sculpture and sound art to installation, architecture and product design - will be examined through readings and presentations. Open source hardware (Arduino) and software (Processing) will be taught along with the fundamentals of electronic circuitry. Emphasis is given to the development of creative projects (individual or collaborative), followed by an iterative implementation process (planning, prototyping, testing, analyzing, and refining). The course is structured around a series of tutorials and exercises, culminating in a final project. Students also present work-in-progress and prototypes during class reviews to receive qualitative feedback from the class and the instructor. Participants will engage with physical computing conceptually and technically in their studio work and are encouraged to leverage their individual backgrounds to excel in the respective context. Prior experience with electronics and programming is recommended but not required.
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CTC-2006Computation Technology and CultureSpring 3Spatial AudioShawn GreenleeCTC elective
Spatial Audio focuses on the creation of immersive 3D sound experiences. In this course, students analyze and explore how the sensation of space is activated in the listener by making works using spatial audio techniques. These methods include high-order ambisonics, vector-based amplitude panning, multichannel surround, and binaural audio, among others. Throughout the semester, a series of exercises addressing technical and theoretical issues provide students with the necessary experience to produce midterm and final projects. Coursework involves computational approaches to sound design and composition, with instruction in the audio programming language Max and digital audio workstations, i.e. Ableton Live and Reaper. Students have recurring access to a 25-channel loudspeaker array for the development of works. Readings from psychology, philosophy, the arts, and sound studies support class discussions and critiques.
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CTC-2005Computation Technology and CultureSpring 3Seeing MachinesClement VallaCTC elective
‘Seeing Machines’ are imaging technologies that produce and distribute pictures. (1) Google maps, surveillance networks, museum digital archives, QR codes, and facial recognition systems are some examples. Their quantity and reach is vast: more images are being created by these systems today than the combined sum of all images before the year 2000. In 2017, picture production largely happens within automated networks, distributed by computers in a massive flow of data, (and most won’t ever be seen by the human eye). This class will explore how artists intervene and subvert Seeing Machines’ tools—scripts, programs, automation and other technologies — to systematize, classify and distribute images. Through a set of projects, student-led presentations, readings and discussions, we will understand how Seeing Machines operate and control, and create methods to make artwork in response. Topics will include: images that have never been seen by humans, making images for machines, programming and automation, security & privacy, databases & their lack of objectivity, are pixels real?, the Enlightenment as precursor, the quantification of space & time, lenses without photographers (1) Trevor Paglen, Seeing Machines, 2014 [https://www.fotomuseum.ch/en/explore/still-searching/articles/26978]
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CTC-2007Computation Technology and CultureWintersession3Of Sound and VisionMark CetiliaCTC elective
This intensive studio course investigates computational approaches to generating sound and image in real time. Precedents from experimental film and video, as well as sound, installation, and performance art will be examined in relationship both to human perception and the students' artistic practice. The course will include discussion of key historical works and texts, hands-on demonstrations and in-class projects, as well as critical engagement with new works by class members. Students will use programming environments such as Max and its object libraries for sound and video, MSP and Jitter, to explore the creative and expressive potentials of an intermedia production practice, culminating in the development of a larger work that incorporates knowledge gained throughout the course.
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CTC-3000Computation Technology and CultureFall3CTC Concentration ProjectClement VallaCTC requirement
CTC Concentration Project is a required, advanced course for all CTC Concentrators taken after a student has earned 12 CTC credits. In this course, students develop and complete a large scale project that draws from the students' prior studies in the CTC Concentration. Students write source code, author software, and program hardware for making their own works of art and design. Complementing this work, students engage in critical discourse surrounding computation, technology, and culture through dialogue and writing. Coding as a technology with implications for making and authorship is explored through a pedagogy of code sharing and collaborative learning. Differences in programming cultures across languages and disciplines is one of the motive forces in this course. Throughout the semester, seminar discussions are organized around canonical computational texts.
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CTC-3001Computation Technology and CultureSpring 3CTC Concentration ProjectChris NovelloCTC requirement
CTC Concentration Project is a required, advanced course for all CTC Concentrators taken after a student has earned 12 CTC credits. In this course, students develop and complete a large scale project that draws from the students' prior studies in the CTC Concentration. Students write source code, author software, and program hardware for making their own works of art and design. Complementing this work, students engage in critical discourse surrounding computation, technology, and culture through dialogue and writing. Coding as a technology with implications for making and authorship is explored through a pedagogy of code sharing and collaborative learning. Differences in programming cultures across languages and disciplines is one of the motive forces in this course. Throughout the semester, seminar discussions are organized around canonical computational texts.
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ARCH-2351ArchitectureFall3ADV TOPICS: ARCH COMPUTATIONMajor Elective
This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on computational topics pertaining to architecture. Computational techniques and computational ideas are explored through making, writing, reading, and discussion. Some of the work in this course will take place in the space of the digital model, but coding, physical computation, and human computation may also enter into play. Students in this course will, under the mentorship of faculty, develop a level of expertise and knowledge that goes beyond what is usually associated with the requisite skills for contemporary architectural practice. Conversely, it is expected that computation may provoke a challenge to even the most base conceptions of design and architecture. Each iteration of this course will identify and advance a single theme, concept or problem. Some issues that may arise during this course include authorship, modeling vs simulation, computer controlled fabrication, intelligence, and creativity. Prerequisite: completion of Architectural Projection or permission of instructor with a demonstrated experience with 2-D and 3-D software.
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ARCH-2352ArchitectureSpring 3ADV TOPICS: ARCH COMPUTATIONMajor Elective
This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on computational topics pertaining to architecture. Computational techniques and computational ideas are explored through making, writing, reading, and discussion. Some of the work in this course will take place in the space of the digital model, but coding, physical computation, and human computation may also enter into play. Students in this course will, under the mentorship of faculty, develop a level of expertise and knowledge that goes beyond what is usually associated with the requisite skills for contemporary architectural practice. Conversely, it is expected that computation may provoke a challenge to even the most base conceptions of design and architecture. Each iteration of this course will identify and advance a single theme, concept or problem. Some issues that may arise during this course include authorship, modeling vs simulation, computer controlled fabrication, intelligence, and creativity. Prerequisite: completion of Architectural Projection or permission of instructor with a demonstrated experience with 2-D and 3-D software.
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FAV-1540Film, Animation, VideoFall3GAME DEVELOPMENT/PROGRAMMINGMr. Edward A Hart
An overview of game production techniques, this course introduces students to the Unity game engine as a tool for moving artwork from the page or the screen, and into the hands of the viewer. The syntax and structure of C# (C-Sharp) and JavaScript will be explored, forming the basis of programming tasks in Unity, and providing foundational skills applicable to other languages. Students will create and work with a range of 2D, 3D, video, and audio assets in the creation of artwork that both informs and responds to the viewer. Modes of display and the corresponding hardware, software, and design constraints will also be investigated, through build formats like VR, AR, Mobile, Desktop. Open to sophomore and above. Permission of Instructor required. Contact FAV Department Coordinator, Rebecca Paiva at rpaiva@risd.edu. Also offered as IDISC-1540; Register in the course for which credit is desired
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DM-7152Digital + MediaFall3RES STUDIO: TECH LANDSCAPESAlyson N. Ogasian
Participants in the Technological Landscapes research group are passionate but critical observers of today's living environment in relation to ubiquitous, integrated, and emerging technologies. It is important that we draw inspiration not necessarily just from art, design, but from real-world events influenced or caused by technological advancement and/or failure. This research group will foster a dynamic, and highly collaborative environment through discussions, readings and excursions. Participants are expected to drive and determine the focus and interests of the group through conversations and consensus. In turn this will feed each participant's artistic sensibility and will form the conceptual foundations necessary for building a strong critical art work. Participants will explore research methodologies and various forms of research as material, social, and symbolic creative practice. The projects, individual or collaborative, should be thought of on a scale of landscape physical or virtual. One is encouraged to exploit the imaginative, speculate possible near futures and position them where the poetic crosses between science fiction and the built reality. Each year the group works together to locate and secure an exhibition space and or develop a site-specific work within the site/topic of study for that year. Each year the site/topic of focus changes, please contact faculty for current information. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 - $200.00 Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration. Please contact the Instructor with any questions and for more details. Open to graduate students and upper level undergraduates from both Architecture and Design and Fine Arts Divisions.
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DM-7152Digital + MediaSpring3RES STUDIO: TECH LANDSCAPES
Shona Kitchen, Alyson N. Ogasian
Participants in the Technological Landscapes research group are passionate but critical observers of today's living environment in relation to ubiquitous, integrated, and emerging technologies. It is important that we draw inspiration not necessarily just from art, design, but from real-world events influenced or caused by technological advancement and/or failure. This research group will foster a dynamic, and highly collaborative environment through discussions, readings and excursions. Participants are expected to drive and determine the focus and interests of the group through conversations and consensus. In turn this will feed each participant's artistic sensibility and will form the conceptual foundations necessary for building a strong critical art work. Participants will explore research methodologies and various forms of research as material, social, and symbolic creative practice. The projects, individual or collaborative, should be thought of on a scale of landscape physical or virtual. One is encouraged to exploit the imaginative, speculate possible near futures and position them where the poetic crosses between science fiction and the built reality. Each year the group works together to locate and secure an exhibition space and or develop a site-specific work within the site/topic of study for that year. Each year the site/topic of focus changes, please contact faculty for current information. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 - $200.00 Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration. Please contact the Instructor with any questions and for more details. Open to graduate students and upper level undergraduates from both Architecture and Design and Fine Arts Divisions.
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DM-3104Digital + MediaSpring3SONIC PRACTICES
Mark J. Cetilia, Mr. Shawn Eugene Greenlee
Sonic Practices is a graduate-level research group focused on acoustic, electronic, and/or computer-based means of sound production and reception. Participants explore audio culture and technology while developing experimental approaches to composition, performance, recording, and/or listening. Areas of investigation include, but are not limited to: audio programming languages, embedded/mobile computing for sound and music, spatial audio, sound synthesis, audio electronics, sonification and auditory display, electroacoustic music composition and improvisation, field recording and soundscape studies, sound installation and performance, and sonic interaction design. Each semester, course content changes in response to a new unifying theme upon which students base individual and team-based research projects. Meetings consist of discussions, workshops, critiques, and collaborations that support students' individual inquiries, the exchange of ideas, and the exploration of research methodologies. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 - $200.00 Elective Open to seniors, graduates. Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
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DM-7013Digital + MediaSpring3ROBOTICSPaul Badger
This is a hands-on introduction to robotics for artists class. Topics covered include: machine shop practices, electronic construction and theory, and computer programming. Students will build robots and utilize robotic technology. Students are free to choose their own microcontroller platforms. Peripheral technology will employ servomotors and sensors. Readings will explore the interface between art and technology. Elective Restricted to senior, fifth-year, and graduate students. Permission of Instructor required. Also offered as DM-7013; Register into course for which credit is desired.
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SCULP-7013SculptureSpring3ROBOTICSPaul Badger
This is a hands-on introduction to robotics for artists class. Topics covered include: machine shop practices, electronic construction and theory, and computer programming. Students will build robots and utilize robotic technology. Students are free to choose their own microcontroller platforms. Peripheral technology will employ servomotors and sensors. Readings will explore the interface between art and technology. Elective Restricted to senior, fifth-year, and graduate students. Permission of Instructor required. Also offered as DM-7013; Register into course for which credit is desired.
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SCULP-4765SculptureFall3THE ARTIST'S MACHINE:Paul Badger
Students learn the basics of electricity and electronics while focusing on how to use microcontrollers (one chip computers) in conjunction with sensors, lights, motors, switchers, audio signals, and basic mechanics in works of art. Projects include timekeepers, simple robots, and interactive environments. Readings and slide/video lectures encompass artist-built machines and sculpture from 1900 to the present. Students can expect to spend time outside of class reading and programming, as well as designing and constructing. No previouis experience with electronics is required. Students should have taken a basic computer art course and, ideally, a sculpture course. Computer programming and machine shop skills are definitely a plus. Major elective Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.
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PAINT-4521PaintingFall3DIGITAL TOOLS FOR ARTISTSTBA
This is a hands-on, project-based introduction to computers and digital multimedia for artists. The course is designed to be an ongoing discussion on art, design and personal work informed by digital images, sound, video, animation, interactive multimedia, and the Internet. Major elective; Painting majors only.
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INTAR-2367Interior ArchitectureSpring3ADV. COMPUTING: DIGITAL FABJongwan KwonMajor Elective
This 12 week seminar will engage desktop making tools to foster familiarity with digital fabrication in the design of the Interior environment. The student will explore the generation of new tectonic forms through abstract geometrical principles. Components of interior architecture will be modeled and fabricated with rapid prototyping and CNC machines. Topics will vary from semester to semester. (LAB 06 Digital Fabrication equipment: Laser Cutter, CNC Routing and 3D printing/ Rhino 5.0 V. Windows + Grasshopper plug-in, VCarve) Major elective: BFA, MDes, MA INTAR majors only
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IDISC-1540InterdisciplinaryFall3GAME DEVELOPMENT/PROGRAMMINGMr. Edward A Hart
An overview of game production techniques, this course introduces students to the Unity game engine as a tool for moving artwork from the page or the screen, and into the hands of the viewer. The syntax and structure of C# (C-Sharp) and JavaScript will be explored, forming the basis of programming tasks in Unity, and providing foundational skills applicable to other languages. Students will create and work with a range of 2D, 3D, video, and audio assets in the creation of artwork that both informs and responds to the viewer. Modes of display and the corresponding hardware, software, and design constraints will also be investigated, through build formats like VR, AR, Mobile, Desktop. Open to sophomore and above. Permission of Instructor required. Contact FAV Department Coordinator, Rebecca Paiva at rpaiva@risd.edu. Also offered as IDISC-1540; Register in the course for which credit is desired
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IDISC-4705InterdisciplinarySpring3DIGITAL SENSEYueh J. Li, Evelyn Eastmond
How can timeless human activities such as drawing and painting, relegated to the realm of the analogue, meaningfully engage increasingly powerful tools such as 3D capturing devices, 3D modeling platforms, and contemporary output methods such as 3D printing? How can we learn to intuit in the realm of the virtual and what are the boundaries of this experience? This course allows new ways of "seeing" and "feeling" and uses a computational framework in the design process. Rather than take a conventional approach based on the technical aspects of a specific software program, students are exposed to a rich diversity of potential work flows. The goal of this course is enhancing personal craft and technique through these digital tools while exploring new potential approaches to advanced technology. Open to sophomore and above. Also offered as GRAD-4075; Register in the course for which credit is desired.
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HPSS-S493
History, Philosophy and the Social Sciences
Spring3MEDIA CULTURE & THEORYMichelle R. Duncan
This course introduces theoretical concepts that have influenced our understanding of media and modern culture. Our aim will be to interrogate the relationship between representation and modernity, exploring how various media structure perceptions of ourselves and the world around us. Students will read a collection of texts from various critical traditions including semiotics, structuralism, post-structuralism, psychoanalysis, social theory, feminism, queer studies, post-modernism, critical race studies, and post-colonial theory. HPSS-S101 is a prerequisite if the student desires HPSS credit.
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HAVC-W463History of Art and Visual CultureWintersession3SCIENCE OF ARTMatthew H. Landrus
This course will examine scientific and technical applications developed by Western artists and visual theorists from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century. Concentrating on pictorial traditions, the course will address what artists, authors and artist/engineers have referred to as scientific, technical, mechanical, and purely mental solutions to optical, proportional and quantitative visual problems. General themes will be perspective, form, color, and mechanical devices, and will include discussions on intellectual training, notebooks, treatises, and collecting. The course will examine artists such as Masaccio, Leonardo, Piero della Francesca, D|rer, Serlio, Carlo Urbino, Cigoli, Rubens, Vel`zquez, Saenredam, Vermeer, Poussin, Andrea Pozzo, Canaletto, Phillip Otto Runge,Turner, Delacroix, Monet, and Seurat.
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GRAPH-3192Graphic DesignSpring3COMPUTER UTOPIASChristopher M. NovelloMajor Elective
The goal of this studio is to reimagine the personal computer. Three decades ago, the Macintosh dropped a sci-fi bomb on pop culture. It advertised a utopic vision of human-computer creativity to mass audiences. By remixing military-industrial-academic fragments, a product company sold the dream of new humanism. This decade, the planet is bursting with smartphones; billions of people will carry globally-networked pocket computers, each outfitted with sensors that datify the material world. We now have quantities, rates, and kinds of data unlike anything humankind has ever seen. Individual biological minds can't reason at network scale, so we're teaching fields of computers to do it instead. If the data center is today's mainframe, is there a Macintosh hiding in the next decade? If your phone's camera is the next mouse, what will it click on? As machine learning reinvents humanism, what are 21st century creative tools? What do network literacy and 21st century citizenship look like? Is the programmer/user dichotomy destroyable? How much of this is just a design problem? We'll explore these topics with studio work and seminar-style discussion. Studio work will include creation of mockups, videos, webmedia, interaction design, and beyond. Prototypes and design fictions are welcome. Programming experience is not explicitly required. Sincere eagerness to rigorously engage and reorient computer culture is a must. Major elective; Graphic design majors only. Open to juniors and above.
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GRAPH-3271Graphic DesignWintersession3WEB DESIGNTBAMajor Elective
This introductory course will allow students to understand the web as a medium, covering the technical basics of HTML, CSS, and Javascript, as well as recent practices in web design and development. We'll learn the tools and techniques involved in creating a website from scratch, while exploring the application of graphic design principles to web-based technology. Class time will consist of discussions of relevant readings, technical lectures, design critiques, and hands-on coding workshops. No prior coding experience required. Requirements: Students must be comfortable with Adobe Photoshop. Students must provide their own laptop (Mac or PC) loaded with Photoshop and an HTML editing program (Dreamweaver, BBEdit, GoLive, etc.). Section 1: Open to sophomore and above Section 2: Open to all
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GRAPH-7001Graphic DesignFall3INTERACTIVE TEXTMr. Rafael AttiasMajor Elective
Presented as fine art practice, this course will introduce the student to narrative and non-narrative experimentation with language in digital space. During the course students will be given a number of short term assignments which will serve as explorations of common themes. Students will also propose a longer term investigation, that will develop in the form of a semester long project. We will explore both analog and digital technologies to develop the concepts presented during the semester, utilizing Final Cut, After Effects, Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, Ableton Live and/or other programs for the production of texts. The course will have an interactive sound and image emphasis. Students will experiment with interactive text, visuals, and audio composition in the digital realm, placing emphasis on the effect and meaning transformation that occurs when texts are combined with visuals and audio material. The course will balance conceptual concerns related to content and structuring methodologies with artistic expression. Specific Aesthetic histories will be explored tracing the use of text in artistic practice including Concrete Poetry, the texts of Kurt Schwitters, Russian Constructivist posters, Fluxus poetic works, the Dada and Surrealist Word/Image, Magritte, Jenny Holtzer, Ed Ruscha, Barbara Kruger as well as other contemporary practitioners. Major elective; Graphic Design majors only. Open to juniors and above.
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GRAPH-3188Graphic DesignFall1WKSHP: WEB PROGRAMMINGTBAMajor Elective
This workshop combines the tactical skills needed to structure web pages with a looser more playful compositional mindset. Students are introduced to the structural elements and properties of HTML and CSS through hands-on demos and take-home assignments. Tight technical HTML drawings in week one give way to looser, full-screen abstract compositions in week two. Weeks three and four make use of animation and interactivity using CSS3 and jQuery. Major elective; Graphic Design majors only. Open to non-majors with permission by the Department.
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GRAPH-3176Graphic DesignFall1Workshop: Programming ConceptsChris Novello
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GRAD-176GGraduate StudiesSpring3COMPUTATIONAL LINETBA
This course uses drawing as the territory for inquiry into computational topics that span from ancient history and the first mathematical algorithm to contemporary technologies that use pixel-based images to augment human perception. The concept, topic, and idea of the line is respected simultaneously as first geometric symbol, unit of perception, element of architecture, and foil to both pixels and material. Students will develop drawing apparatuses while considering perspectives of anthropologists (Tim Ingold, for example) art historians (Deanna Petherbridge) and architects (Marco Frascari). The relationship between perception, depth, and figure will is a recurring theme as is the tension between a line of code, a line of inquiry, and a line on paper. Graduate elective - studio
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