GER 101: ddd Application 2014

Deadline: 5:00 PM on Monday, September 8. Applicants will be notified of their status by 9:00 AM on Tuesday, September 9.
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    Foreign Language Profile

    For the self-assessment: 1 minimal: typical tourist, e.g., can ask where the bus stop is, but can’t quite understand the answer; can read street signs, maybe understand some items on a restaurant menu 2 basic: can have short dialogues with patient native speakers on a narrow range of familiar topics; can read newspaper captions (or at least get the gist of them), and write short, simple notes 3 okay: can get by in the foreign culture; can interact with native speakers on everyday topics, write short paragraphs, and read short, easy texts 4 good: competent, but never mistaken for a native speaker: can carry on extended conversations, on a variety of familiar and not-so-familiar topics; can write detailed descriptions of concrete and subjective experiences 5 great: occasionally taken to be a native speaker: can understand TV shows and movies, including most cultural references; can make jokes with native speakers; can express complex ideas in writing; can pick up nuances of tone in texts, or do research using texts in the language
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    Language Learning Profile

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    The Fine Print

    The deadline for current freshmen and sophomore to apply is 5:00 PM on Monday, September 8. You will be notified of your status no later than 9:00 AM on Tuesday, September 9, so that you can include this information when discussing your schedule with your adviser. The classroom time for the "der:die:das" sections will focus on communication and functional ability in German, just like the other sections of the course; but the curriculum itself is entirely new. Rather than forcing you to memorize randomly chosen vocabulary items from chapter to chapter, it focuses on mastery of the most frequently used vocabulary in German, based on a recently published list of German vocabulary. If you learn the "core vocabulary" present in the course, you'll be able to read 70-75% of any text in German – and to follow 90+% of spoken German. In addition, and equally important, its chapters will give you a fresh look at German/Swiss/Austrian culture today, with an emphasis on “transcultural” understanding. These sections will serve as a final development site for the curriculum, which means you will be encouraged to provide input on how well the course content and its classroom use are achieving the goals of the course. Your participation will influence the shape of the course for its subsequent use at Princeton – and beyond. There will be two sections that use "der:die:das" curriculum, both taught by Prof. Rankin. They will meet M-F, like all introductory language courses; one from 9:00 - 9:50, the other from 12:30 - 1:20. They will involve the same amount of classroom time and roughly the same amount of work assigned for outside of class as the “traditional” sections, though with far more emphasis on vocabulary acquisition. Participants in these special sections will have three options for the Spring 2015 term: • continue with the new online curriculum in GER 1025 (which counts for two courses: GER 102 and GER 105), assuming that you've done well in 101; • move into a “traditional” GER 1025 section, using the traditional textbook (which you’ll need to purchase); • enroll in a traditional section of GER 102, using the traditional textbook (i.e., there will be no “special” section of GER 102). In other words: You won’t be “trapped” in the new curriculum, if you decide you'd prefer to use the traditional curriculum it; but we hope you’ll continue with the online curriculum through both terms. Due to the nature of the curriculum, students from the “traditional” sections will not be able to transfer into the new curriculum mid-year – which means that if you’re interested in exploring the new approach, you’ll need to enroll in the fall. Enrollment in GER 1025, and then in GER 107G (Princeton-in-Munich) is conditional on successful completion of the relevant previous course, with a grade of B- or better.