A Year at a Glance

Grade:            2                Subject:  ELA  

1st Marking Period

 A Year at a Glance

Grade:     2                Subject:   Science

1st Marking Period         Forces and Motion

2. P.1.1 Illustrate how sound is produced by vibrating objects and columns of air.

2.P.1.2 Summarize the relationship between sound and objects of the

body that vibrate – eardrum and vocal cords.

2nd Marking Period        Matter:  Properties and Change

2.P.2.1 Give examples of matter that change from a solid to a liquid and from a liquid to a solid by heating and cooling.

2.P.2.2 Compare the amount (volume and weight) of water in a container before and after freezing.

2.P.2.3 Compare what happens to water left in an open container over time as to water left in a closed container.

3rd Marking Period:  Earth Systems, Structures and Processes

2.E.1.1 Summarize how energy from the sun serves as a source of

light that warms the land, air and water.

2.E.1.2 Summarize weather conditions using qualitative and

quantitative measures to describe:

• Temperature

• Wind direction

• Wind speed

• Precipitation

2.E.1.3 Compare weather patterns that occur over time and relate

observable patterns to time of day and time of year.

2.E.1.4 Recognize the tools that scientists use for observing,

recording, and predicting weather changes from day to day

and during the seasons.

4th Marking Period    Structures and Functions of Living Organisms

                                                         Evolution and Genetics

2.L.1.1 Summarize the life cycle of animals:

  • Birth
  • Developing into an adult
  • Reproducing
  • Aging and death

2.L.1.2 Compare life cycles of different animals such as, but not

limited to, mealworms, ladybugs, crickets, guppies or frogs

2.L.2.1 Identify ways in which many plants and animals closely

resemble their parents in observed appearance and ways they

are different.

2.L.2.2 Recognize that there is variation among individuals that are related.

Year At a Glance

Grade:      2                Subject:   Social Studies

1st Marking Period                   Civics and Governance

2.C&G.1.1 Explain government services and their value to the community (libraries, schools, parks, etc.).

2.C&G.1.2 Explain how governments establish order, provide security and create laws to manage conflict.  

2nd Marking Period                  History and Culture

2.H.1.1 Use timelines to show sequencing of events.

2.H.1.2 Identify contributions of historical figures (community, state, nation, and world) through various genres.

2.H.1.3 Compare various interpretations of the same time period using evidence such as photographs and interviews.

2.C.1.1 Explain how artistic expressions of diverse cultures contribute to the community (stories, art, music, food, etc.).

2.C.1.2 Recognize the key historical figures and events that are associated with various cultural traditions.  

2.C.1.3 Exemplify respect and appropriate social skills needed for working with diverse groups.

3rd Marking Period                    Economics and Financial Literacy

2.E.1.1 Give examples of ways in which businesses in the community meet the needs and wants of consumers.

2.E.1.2 Explain the roles and impact producers and consumers have on the economy.

2.E.1.3 Summarize the concept of supply and demand.

2.E.1.4 Explain why people and countries around the world trade for goods and services.

2.E.1.5 Explain how money is used for saving, spending, borrowing and giving.

2.E.1.6 Summarize the role of financial institutions relative to savings.

4th Marking Period                    Geography and Environmental LIteracy

2.G.1.1 Interpret maps of the school and community that contain symbols, legends and cardinal directions.

2.G.1.2 Interpret the meaning of symbols and the location of physical and human features on a map (cities, railroads, highways, countries, continents, oceans, etc.).

2.G.2.1 Give examples of ways in which people depend on the physical environment and natural resources to meet basic needs

2.G.2.2 Explain how people positively and negatively affect the environment.  

A Year at a Glance

Grade:     2                Subject:   Mathematics

1st Marking Period            Numbers and Operations in Base Ten

                                                  Operations and Algebraic Equations

2.0A.1 Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

(Refer to page 35 in the Unpacking Document)

2.OA.2 Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.

By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.

2.0A.3 Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even

number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s;

write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal

addends.

2.NBT.1 Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:

a.  100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a “hundred.”

b.  The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to

one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0

tens and 0 ones).

2.NBT.2 Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.

2.NBT.3 Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number

names, and expanded form.

2.NBT.4 Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

2.MD.6 Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number line diagram with equally spaced points corresponding to the numbers 0, 1, 2, ..., and represent whole-number sums and differences within 100 on a number line diagram.

2nd Marking Period             Numbers and Operations in Base Ten (Numeration)

                                                     Operations and Algebraic Equations

2.0A.1 Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

(Refer to page 35 in the Unpacking Document)

2.MD.6 Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number line diagram with equally spaced points corresponding to the numbers 0, 1, 2, ..., and represent whole-number sums and differences within 100 on a number line diagram.

2.MD.8  Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies using $ appropriately.

2.NBT.5 Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between

addition and subtraction.

2.NBT.6  Add up to four two digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

2.NBT.7 Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or

decompose tens or hundreds.

2.NBT.8 Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100–900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a given number 100–900.

2.NBT.9 Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work, using place value and the properties of operations.

3rd Marking Period                             Measurement and Data

2.0A.1 Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step

word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting

together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions,

e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown

number to represent the problem. (Refer to page 35 in the Unpacking Document)

2.MD.1 Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.

2.MD.2 Measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen.

2.MD.3 Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet, centimeters, and meters.

2.MD.4 Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit.

2.MD.5 Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve word problems involving lengths that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as drawings of rulers) and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

2.MD.7 Tell and write time for analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and p.m.

2.MD.8 Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies using $ appropriately.  

2.MD.9 Generate measurement data by measuring lengths of several objects to the nearest whole unit, or by making repeated measurements of the same object. Show the measurements by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in whole-number units.

2.NBT.6  Add up to four two digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

2.NBT.7 Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds.

4th Marking Period         Measurement and Data

                                             Geometry

2.OA.4 Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.

2.G.1 Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces. Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.

2.G.2 Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size squares and

count to find the total number of them.

2.G.3 Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares,

describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of,

etc., and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths.

Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the

same shape.

2.MD.7   Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and p.m.

2.MD.10 Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to

represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.

2.NBT.7 Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or

decompose tens or hundreds.