Table of Contents

Mission

Department Policies and Procedures

Department Roles, Responsibilities, & Services

Department Services

Educational Technologists and Faculty

Professional Development & Inservice Points

Five-Step Modeling Method

Evaluation of Educational Technologists

Fiscal Resources

Technology Availability

Time Management

Strategies for Success

Communication

Program Evaluation

Supported Software

Faculty Lesson Planning

Educational Technologists Scheduling Time with Faculty

Faculty Scheduling Time with Educational Technologists

Post Training Survey

Pine Crest School Technology Culture

Academic Research

Copyright : Digital Multimedia

Internet Responsibility

Managing Student Technology Use in the Classroom

New Media Literacies

Classroom/Grade Level Projects

Personal and Academic Technology Goals

Teacher21 Program

Hardware/Software Policies & Procedures

Devices Supported and Allowed on the Network

Equipment Signout

File Formats

Sharing Websites

Software

IPad Policies and Procedures

Faculty iPad Expectations:

Student iPad Expectations:

General IPad Precautions:

Project Sharing of Faculty and Student Accomplishments (Vimeo)

Videoconferencing

Previous Content Providers:

Videoconferencing Procedures:

End of Year Procedures

Faculty

Educational Technologists

Content / Learning Management System

Users

Courses

Communication

*Pine Crest School’s Digital Media Copyright Policy

* Pine Crest School’s Guide to Understanding New Media Literacies

Creativity

Critical Thinking

Communication

Collaboration

Systems Thinking

Supported Software and Websites

Educational Technology Goals - Faculty Worksheet

Pine Crest School - Department of Educational Technology

Mission

The goal for the Department of Educational Technology is to enhance instructional practice and achievement for the 21st Century learner by supporting administrators, faculty and their work with students. By supporting faculty in the planning and implementation of instruction, the Educational Technology Department provides the link between technology tools and their effective integration into all areas of instruction, productivity, and instructional management. In addition, the Educational Technology Department delivers the expertise, the focus, and the resources to maximize the use of technology tools to improve teaching and learning for faculty and students at Pine Crest School.

Department Policies and Procedures

Department Roles, Responsibilities, & Services

The objective of the Department of Educational Technology is to provide support for creating authentic technology integrated lessons aligned with each division’s curriculum and to help faculty members attain the technical expertise needed to meet their technology goals.

Duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to the following:

Department Services

*If you are in need of networking/hardware support, please contact the IT Department by filling out a help-desk ticket.

Educational Technologists and Faculty

The responsibility of an Educational Technologist is to provide professional development by modeling diverse instructional strategies, participating in collaborative teaching, researching technology and reviewing software.

Educational Technologists can assist faculty, directly,  through classroom visitations and individual planning sessions.  Professional development can occur anytime during, before, or after the school day. In service points will be awarded for the participation and completion of professional development opportunities.

Professional Development & Inservice Points

Teachers renewing their Florida Teaching Certificates are limited to various inservice point maximums for the different components established by the Florida Council of Independent Schools (FCIS).

At the end of each academic year the Department of Educational Technology will submit a list of proposed workshops for the upcoming year to the Teacher Certification and Inservice Coordinator. The list should include the title, general objectives, specific objectives, activities or applications, and evaluations for each workshop. Additional workshops can be added as needed during the school year.

Points earned for technology related trainings offered on Teacher Workdays will be included under the general professional development category on the individual inservice form sent to teachers by the Teacher Certification and Inservice Coordinator.

Points awarded for individual technology workshops are based on the same formula as all other Pine Crest inservice workshops: 1 workshop activity hour = 1 point.

Five-Step Modeling Method

Educational Technologists are teachers of the faculty.  Their main responsibility is to train faculty throughout all divisions. The recommended approach is the Five-Step Modeling Method:

One of the Department’s goals is to help faculty learn how to select appropriate technology tools or software and apply these to their lessons, without relying on Educational Technologists to select and implement these tools and software. The Educational Technologist should not be restrictive and act as a gatekeeper for technology use in the classroom.  Educational Technologists support and enable faculty to perform technology related functions so they can eventually be independent integrators of technology in their own classroom environment.

Evaluation of Educational Technologists

The focal point of an Educational Technologist’s work is to provide professional development, which should form the primary basis of their evaluations. Educational technologists should be evaluated by a combination of the division heads and Director of Educational Technology for a more comprehensive evaluation.

Fiscal Resources

With the exceptions of hardware and infrastructure, Educational Technologists are responsible for recommending the purchase of technology items that support instruction.  These include software, consumable materials, incentives, substitutes, and emerging technologies.

Technology Availability

Educational Technologists should enable faculty to make full use of available technology and recommend purchases to the school or division to enhance and support existing technology and curriculum.  Educational Technologists should also seek out affordable online resources to support such curriculum.

Time Management

The following table demonstrates the amount of time an Educational Technologist should spend on various tasks, with the understanding that actual times will vary among Educational Technologists due to various school and division factors.  

One note about the following table is that Educational Technologists should spend approximately five percent of their time in personal professional development to keep their knowledge and skills current.  Professional development activities should include online and traditional courses, workshops and conferences, and related literature; focus topics should include instructional practices, emerging technologies, and effectiveness of existing technologies.

Recommended Percentages of Time for Various Educational Technologist Tasks

Percent of Time

Task

68%

Assist faculty with the integration of technology in the classroom, train faculty to use technology, assist with curriculum development as it relates to educational technology, model instructional strategies with students, provide training and professional development, collaborate with faculty, research technology-based instructional strategies, review/evaluate technology software, offer direct assistance to faculty by way of classroom visitations, or fulfill similar kinds of duties and responsibilities as the department deems appropriate.

Provide professional development activities for administrators.

14%

Meet with administrators to coordinate services and resources.  Assist administrators with data-driven decision making relating to all areas of curriculum and instruction dealing with technology.

9%

Communicate department events and information to school, faculty, and administration (e.g. Educational Technology page, e-mail notifications, Twitter posts).

5%

Conduct personal professional development, including research relating to professional growth goals, related conference attendance, workshops, and coursework.

3%

Conduct minor troubleshooting of computer lab equipment, and classroom hardware and software problems.

1%

Maintain records necessary to document progress and activities, such as journal, blog, appointment system or database of activities.

Educational Technologists are accountable for their time.  They should report to the Director of Educational Technology and division heads as needed.  

Strategies for Success

Communication

Communication is key to the success of the integration of educational technologies.  Educational Technologists are responsible for communicating known instructional strategies and resources to the faculty, staff and administrators they serve.  

One way the Educational Technologists communicate with faculty is through the Educational Technology page.  “EdTech Tip Tuesdays” provide brief descriptions of an available technology and explain how it can be integrated into curricula using text, screenshots, video tutorials, and links to sample resources. There is an online Videoconference Request Form and active Videoconference Calendar; tutorials for academic software currently in use; and subscription login information for both campuses.

Another communication method used by our department is Twitter.  Educational Technologists use the hashtag #PCTECHTIPS to share resources and trends in the world of educational technology, via Twitter.  The use of Twitter also includes announcements of upcoming or available training opportunities, tips, tricks and links.

Program Evaluation

Each division should evaluate the effectiveness of the Department of Educational Technology and determine whether the team is meeting the goals of the division.

Supported  and Unsupported Software

The Department of Educational Technology supports and trains faculty and students on many different websites and software titles.  These titles are currently the only titles supported by the Department.  If you wish to use an unsupported title, you will be responsible for troubleshooting any issues.  If a title is not supported the Department will evaluate the software and it’s educational value, before adding it to the supported software list.  Please see Supported Software list of these titles.

Purchasing Software

The Department of Educational Technology is to be the only department to purchase software for classroom use.  If a department, division or faculty member would like additional software that requires payment to be made, such as a web-service or stand-alone title, the Department of Educational Technology needs to be involved in the purchasing process.  The order of events for purchasing new titles is as follows:

1. Notify the Department of Educational Technology of a type of software you are interested in or provide the name of software you wish to use.

2. Schedule and meet with a member of the Department of Educational Technology to discuss the purchase. (We may have available titles that are similar and support).

3. If the Department of Educational Technology accepts the request for the new software title, the Department will contact the provider for a quotation with the number of licenses or copies needed.

4. - If this is the first time the title is being purchased, the funds for purchasing the title will be transferred from the requester’s division/department budget, to the IT Department’s budget. (The Director of Educational Technology will provide the account information to the department chair or division head for transferring funds). The Department of Educational Technology will budget for the software for the ongoing years of use.

   - If this is a recurring purchase, the Department of Educational Technology will have budgeted funds for the title, and will re-order the title before expiration.

5.  Once the title is purchased, the Department of Educational Technology will provide the faculty member, department or division with user account information.

Faculty Lesson Planning

Educational technologists are most effective when classroom faculty and the School’s technologists plan for technology-integrated instruction together, in advance.

Educational Technologists Scheduling Time with Faculty

Educational Technologists are required to keep track of their own calendar, using Google Calendar.  Events are to be shared that pertain to meeting times and locations, in the event an Educational Technologist needs to be located.

Prior to the meeting or training, contact the participant to make sure they are still available at the scheduled time.  If they are unavailable, reschedule at a mutually agreeable time.

It is recommended to schedule shared planning time with faculty at least one week in advance of the date which the faculty member wishes to execute the technology-based lesson.

Faculty Scheduling Time with Educational Technologists

When contacting an educational technologist the faculty member should indicate their own name, their desired meeting location, 3 available times to meet, and the topic(s) being covered.

It is recommended to schedule shared planning time with an educational technologist at least one week in advance of the date which the faculty member wishes to execute the technology-based lesson.

Post Training Survey

Upon the completion of any training, Educational Technologists must send out the post training template email, containing the link to the survey, to training participants within 24 hours. See Appendix _.

Pine Crest School Technology Culture

Academic Research

Academic research should be collaborative between media specialist, the Department and faculty. School databases are specifically and strongly encouraged for faculty and students across all divisions.

In lower school the media specialist along with the classroom faculty conducts database demonstrations and provides support for content area research projects, which is the primary method of research.

In middle and upper school, the school librarian(s) conduct orientation sessions and are available to teach research skills using content specific databases in the library and in classrooms by faculty invitation.On campus, all databases are available without login authentication.  Passwords are provided in Blackboard for access from home.

Educational technologists, along with the media specialists, and faculty are encouraged when introducing a research project to middle and upper school students, to review how to verify the validity of web sources, and how to triangulate their sources. This is specifically for research being done on non-database Internet websites.

Copyright : Digital Multimedia

Pine Crest School requires that students and faculty have a good understanding of copyright and fair use. This policy applies to the work of students and faculty who use other people's copyrighted material as part of their own academic or creative work.

Please see Pine Crest School’s official Digital Media Copyright Policy

Internet Responsibility

The goal of the Department of Educational Technology is to promote and ensure “Internet Responsibility” for both students and faculty. This is defined by the understanding of the ethical issues and responsibilities as they relate to Internet technology use.

The Department is responsible for educating students on digital citizenship and ‘netiquette’ as well as assisting faculty in providing age appropriate lessons and resources for students.  These topics include, but are not limited to, creating online accounts/profiles, using the Internet as well as social media websites, sharing personal information and passwords, ethical communication, cyber-bullying, identifying inappropriate website content, and methods to evaluate the validity of research found online.

Please consult the Department of Educational Technology before instructing students to create online accounts/profiles for classroom or homework activities.

Managing Student Technology Use in the Classroom

As electronic devices become available for use in the classroom, faculty need to be prepared to manage student behavior when using these devices. Technology classroom management requires a different skill set than traditional classroom management.

Educational technologists will be available to help provide faculty with classroom management strategies, specific to the use student laptops and other mobile computing devices.

If you are experiencing behavioral issues with students using their personal technology (example: cell phone), please contact an educational technologist for guidance in management strategies.

New Media Literacies

 A gap exists between the skill set students learn in traditional schools and what they need to know to be successful in today’s competitive global economies. In order to prepare students for the modern workforce, the Department of Educational Technology recommends incorporating new media literacies that go beyond traditional reading and writing of language. Knowing how to create multimedia assignments using images, audio, and video components are just as essential as learning how to communicate using spoken and written language.1

The Department of Educational Technology believes the most expedient way to incorporate new media literacies into existing curriculum is to use a project-based model when facilitating class lessons, designating homework, and assigning coursework assessments in your classroom. By participating in project-based learning, students will engage in what current pedagogy has termed the “Four C’s” of 21st century education. These components are: Creativity, Communication, Collaboration, and Critical Thinking.

Classroom/Grade Level Projects

The Department of Educational Technology is available to help facilitate classroom and grade level technology integrated projects.  

Educational Technologists will assist faculty in lesson planning, rubric creation, and follow the Five-Step Modeling Method.

Faculty will want to meet with Educational Technologists no later than 1 (one) week in advance to ensure all resources are acquired, plans are created, and potential issues are solved or noted.

Please see New Media Literacies component document (at the bottom of the document)

Personal and Academic Technology Goals

Personal goal setting is an integral part of professional development at Pine Crest School. To facilitate growth in the use of current educational technology tools, faculty in all divisions will set one personal and one academic goal pertaining to technology integration.  

The Educational Technology Goals Form along with a non-comprehensive list of available technology tools (Appendix ___) will be available on the Ed Tech Page.  Faculty may complete the form independently or with the support of an Educational Technologist. An informal review of the faculty member’s progress will take place at mid-year and at the end of the school year with an educational technologist.

In lower school, educational technologists will partner with each Teacher I and Teacher II along with the assigned ‘Teacher 21’s’ to assist with goal setting and to develop a plan for meeting said goals.

Faculty members in the Middle and Upper Schools will meet with the Educational Technologist and Teacher 21’s at the beginning of the school year in grade level or department meetings to identify individual goals and to establish a plan for the year.

Sample Personal Goal: Create an active Personal Learning Network (PLN) via  the creation and maintenance of a Twitter account throughout the school year.

Sample Academic Goal: Incorporate Digital Storytelling at least once during each semester

Teacher21 Program

Faculty members who demonstrate technology proficiency will be recognized and take a leadership role called “Teacher21.”  Each May, the Department of Educational Technology will hold nominations and distribute applications.  

Faculty members accepted into the Teacher21 program will receive a yearly stipend for  completion of their service.  They will be required to attend an annual conference, and will be given funds for additional professional development opportunities they wish to pursue.

These Teacher21s will be considered mentors for those teachers in their department or grade-level. They will be responsible for facilitating at least one training for their grade-level team/department or division during the academic year, and attending one meeting a month with the Department of Educational Technology.  Teacher21s will serve as a liaison between their team and the Department of Educational Technology.  They will report back training requests and additional information supplied during their daily interaction with their team, and share meeting notes that involve educational technology from their grade-level/department meetings.

With this model of instruction and involvement, faculty will know who they can seek out for additional help and will be provided timely responses to questions.  The Teacher21 will not have all of the responsibilities of an Educational Technologist.

Teacher21 Job Responsibilities and Expectations

Hardware/Software Policies & Procedures

Devices Supported and Allowed on the Network

The Department of Educational Technology only supports devices supplied or supported by Pine Crest School.  Personal devices may be used with the classroom faculty’s permission but will not be supported nor be given access to the Pine Crest network.

Equipment Signout

The Department of Educational Technology has many resources available to sign out for use in the classroom.  See an Educational Technologist for more information. Some of these items are:

Equipment may only be signed out by a member of the Department of Educational Technology.  Educational Technologists will be required to document the following:

All equipment must be returned the next day, unless noted otherwise.  Equipment sign-out is on a first-come, first-served basis.  Equipment sign-outs are non-transferrable from one faculty member to another.  The individual signing out equipment is solely responsible for the condition and the return of the signed-out equipment.

Lost or Damaged Equipment

Lost or damaged equipment will be charged to the faculty member’s department for replacement.  If replacement is required, the Department of Educational Technology will purchase the same model or similar model.

In the event that a piece of equipment is returned damaged or broken, the following steps will be followed:

1. The educational technologist will report to the Director of Educational Technology and present the broken equipment

2. The educational technologist will contact the party who signed out the equipment and collect information of how the equipment broke, when it happened, and where it occurred.

3. The educational technologist will provide the Director of Educational Technology with the written finding

4. The Director of Educational Technology will contact the department chair or division head with all findings, and copy the educational technologist and the party returning the equipment

File Formats

The Educational Technology Department will support the following sharing sites for student-created and faculty-created documents and projects, in the following file formats:

Sharing Websites

Service

Name

File Formats

Video Sharing

Vimeo

.mp4, .wmv, .avi, .mov, .m4v

Online Storage/File Sharing

DropBox, Google Drive (Web-based versions only)

You can put any file in your Dropbox or Google Drive account, regardless of type. Almost anything you save to your computer can be saved to your Dropbox and Google Drive, including all of your documents, movies, music, photos, internet downloads

Photo Sharing

Picasa, Animoto, Smilebox, Shutterfly (password protected)

.jpg, .tiff, .png, .gif

Many software titles require you to export your project to a particular format before uploading to one of the sharing services above.  Below is a list of frequently used software titles and the file format projects should be exported to:

Software

Type

Software Title

Required File Format

Photostory

Video

.avi

Windows Live Movie Maker

Video

.avi

Audacity

Audio

.mp3, .wav

iMovie

Video

.mov, .mp4

iPhoto

Photo

.jpg, .gif, .png, .tiff

Microsoft Word

Word Processing

.doc, .docx, .pdf

Microsoft Excel

Spreadsheets

.xls, .csv

Microsoft PowerPoint

Presentations

.ppt

Conversion:

IPad Policies and Procedures

iPad apps will be purchased and distributed using our mobile management solution. When faculty and students use school-owned iPads, a message will prompt them to install available apps distributed through a repository.  Although this will have to be done on each iPad, the process will only take seconds for the app to be downloaded and ready to use.  

 

The Department of Educational Technology will evaluate apps before purchasing them.  Faculty is encouraged to research and share apps they feel is appropriate for their grade level and subject area.  

 

Aside from the App Store, there are several third-party websites to assist with the search for apps such as Appshopper.com, AppAnnie.com and Appadvice.com.  

 

Faculty iPad Expectations:

Student iPad Expectations:

Students are expected to:

Students should NOT:

General iPad Precautions:

The iPad screens can be damaged if subjected to rough treatment. The screens are particularly sensitive to damage from excessive pressure on the screen.

Please DO:

Please DO NOT:

 

Project Sharing of Faculty and Student Accomplishments (Vimeo)

 The Department of Educational Technology will assist faculty and students with uploading videos to share and view on Vimeo. The purpose of the Vimeo website is that viewers can view videos regardless of their platform. The account is managed solely by the Department of Educational Technology.  Faculty or students will need to communicate with a member of the department when their video projects are finished.  Videos, once completed, can be uploaded into Vimeo and the link can be shared/embedded accordingly.  

Videoconferencing

Videoconferencing (VC) offers students in all divisions an engaging, interactive forum for exploring subject area content. Pine Crest has connected with numerous content providers around the United States (see list below) and many faculty incorporate select videoconferences into their curriculum on an annual basis. The educational technologists are able to recommend programs based on age group and content area and will research topics upon request. The educational technologist reviews session costs with the faculty member; discusses venue options, VC cart availability; coordinates connection times with the distance learning providers and requests support from IT as needed.

Previous Content Providers:

Center for Puppetry Arts

Challenger Learning Center

Cincinatti Museum of Art

Cleveland Museum of Art

Cleveland Institute of Music

Cleveland Museum of Natural History

COSI Columbus

Discovery Center of Springfield

Indiana Repertory Theater

Louisville Science Center

Manhattan School of Music

Mote Marine Laboratory

NASA

Paley Center for Media

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

Smithsonian Art Museum

Toledo Zoo

Videoconferencing Procedures:

Faculty members who have never experienced videoconferencing or are interested in exploring new distance learning opportunities should schedule an appointment with their educational technologist.  To browse the available programs on the CILC.org website, click the link on the Ed Tech page.

If you have connected previously with a content provider and wish to schedule another conference with the same provider, fill out as many fields as possible on the Videoconference Request Form on the Ed Tech page.  Be sure to fill in your name, email and  multiple options for presentation dates.  Be specific with class period start times. Conference session lengths are usually scheduled for 40 minutes.  We will review the forms, finalizing the schedule with the content provider.

The complete purchasing process should be as follows.  The Items in green are your responsibility

1.  The Ed Tech specialist works with a teacher to find an appropriate video conference.  

2.  If the cost seems high or if we have not done the video conference before, run it by Bryan.

3.  Get a written quote from the provider.

4.  Give the quote to Gloria (Eric in her absence) to create the purchase request in Senior Systems.

5.  When the purchase request is approved it becomes a purchase order. Gloria will give you a copy of the purchase order if needed.

6.  If required by the provider, send them the purchase order or PO#.

7.  Let Gloria know when the conference has been completed and if any changes were made that affect the cost.

8.  When the invoice is received, Gloria compares the invoice to the purchase order.  If they match, she sends both to accounts payable.

9. Accounts payable prints a check and mails it to the provider.

Educational Technologists are required to follow the procedures listed below when coordinating the business side of video conferencing.  

We itemize it here so that faculty understands why last minute requests for video conferences are not easily accommodated.

1.  Technologists work with faculty to find an appropriate video conference.  

2.  If the cost seems high or if we have not worked with the content provider before, technologists run it by Bryan.

3.  Technologists get a written quote from the provider and forward it to Gloria, copying Eric/Bryan.

4.  Technologists include in email to Gloria which grade level or division will be holding the conference.

4.  Gloria creates the purchase request in Senior Systems and waits for Bryan/Eric to approve it.

5.  Once Bryan/Eric approves the purchase request and forwards it to Gloria, it becomes a Purchase Order.

6.  Technologists send a copy of the purchase order or the PO# to the provider prior to videoconference date.

7.  Technologists notify Gloria once the conference is complete and advise of any changes that may affect the cost.

8.  When the invoice is received, Gloria compares the invoice to the purchase order.  If they match, she sends both to accounts payable.

9. Accounts payable prints a check and mails it to the provider.

A similar process should be followed for any other type of purchase.

End of Year Procedures

Faculty

At the end of the school year, before being approved to leave for the summer, faculty must return the following devices to the Department of Educational Technology.  Lost or damaged equipment will be charged to the faculty member’s department for replacement.  If replacement is required, the Department of Educational Technology will purchase the same model or similar model.

Educational Technologists

?????????????????????????????

 

Content / Learning Management System

The purpose of the content/learning management system is two-fold: course delivery and communication to the school’s constituents.

Users

New constituent accounts are created by the LMS administrator. Accounts are subject to the Acceptable Use Policy. Users accounts are terminated when they are no longer affiliated with the school.

The possible types of user roles attached to LMS accounts are: lead teacher, teacher II, student, parent/observer, and system administrator.

Over the summer, the LMS administrator will oversee the removal of non-returning faculty, staff, students and parents.

Although the LMS administrator is responsible for the initial enrollment of students into courses, it is the teacher’s responsibility to maintain accurate student enrollment in their courses throughout the school year. At the end of the academic year, faculty are also responsible for removing users from their courses.

Courses

New courses are created for faculty in the summer. If a course is no longer being taught it is set to unavailable. Existing courses are reused annually. Course creators may be contacted on a yearly basis by the LMS administrator to determine if the course is still in use.

Faculty are responsible for creating and uploading the content to their course, as well as keeping courses up-to-date as determined by their division head.  They are also responsible for hiding/removing any content at the end of the academic year in order to prepare for new student enrollment in the fall. For support with any of these functions, contact the Department of Educational Technology.

Faculty should save electronic copies of all important course-related files (flash-drive, external hard drive, online storage, network storage), which may include the course grade book and any files or material that have been uploaded to the LMS server.

While using the LMS, faculty should recognize there is an ongoing risk of technical problems including, but not limited to, server and network downtime and software "bugs."

If the faculty is experiencing technical difficulty with the course, a ticket should be entered into the “Technology Help Desk”. An educational technologist with follow up with the faculty, and if necessary, open up a ticket with the LMS support desk.

Non-academic / special courses (clubs, organizations, etc.) will be kept active until the owner requests the course to be archived or removed from the LMS. Course creators may archive their course content at any time and store it on their own computer based on the needs of the represented group. Course creators may be contacted on a yearly basis by the LMS administrator to determine if the course is still in use.

 

Communication

If an event or message is to be communicated to the school community, it must be approved by the division or department head. The contents of the announcement, along with any forms or images to be included, should be emailed a minimum of 5 days in advance of posting.

Parents’ Association announcements should also be approved by the PA President and Division head before being posted on the content system.


Pine Crest School’s Digital Media Copyright Policy

 

This document is to help you decide when and how to use copyrighted materials in your creative or academic work. Pine Crest School requires that students and faculty have a good understanding of copyright and fair use. This policy applies to the work of students and faculty who use other people's copyrighted material as part of their own academic or creative work, and it embodies the core legal principles of the Copyright Act of 1976.

What is Copyright Law?

The purpose of copyright law is to promote creativity, innovation and the spread of knowledge. The law does this by balancing the rights of both authors (copyright holders) and users (faculty and students) who wish to reference or appropriate the creator(s)’ original work.

Authors' Rights 

Any creative work, in fixed and tangible form, is copyrighted. Anything you create (writing, video, images, music, etc.) is automatically copyrighted at the moment you create it.

Users' Rights

Under some circumstances, users can use copyrighted works as part of their own creative work. The doctrine of fair use (Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976) states that people can use copyrighted works without payment or permission when the social benefit of the use outweighs the harms to the copyright holder.

What is Fair Use?

To make a fair use determination, users consider all the factors involved in the context and situation of their use of the copyrighted material. Fair use is especially helpful when people want to use small amounts of a copyrighted work for socially beneficial purposes, like news reporting, teaching, comment and criticism, research and scholarship.

Special Exemptions for Faculty and Librarians

Copyright law includes provisions that enable educators to use copyrighted material for teaching and learning. Section 110 allows educators to make performances and displays of all types of works in a classroom. Students and faculty can show videos, read plays, project slides or use copyrighted materials in other ways for educational purposes.

Attribution and Good Faith

Some people mistakenly believe that they can use any copyrighted work in their own creative work as long as they "cite their sources" or use attribution to identify the author. Using attribution is sign of good faith in the fair use process, but it does not shield a user from copyright liability. That's why it's important to make a careful fair use determination using the process described below. Pine Crest School recommends that you make use of attribution whenever possible.

Make a “Fair Use” determination

Critical thinking is required to make a fair use determination. Ask yourself two questions:

1. Transformativeness. 

Is my use of a copyrighted work transformative? Am I using the material for a different purpose than that of the original? If I am then it is transformative. An example would be using s film clip and writing about how the lighting conveys tone, for a critical writing project. Another example is using copyrighted music or video, and then remixing the material an audio or video computer program to create a new, unique, and creative product.

2. Amount. 

The faculty member or student should only use the amount of the film that is necessary to do the critique, mentioned above.

The law empowers users to make a fair use determination for themselves.

Pine Crest School recommends that when using copyrighted material in your digital media production, you put your answers to these questions in writing, using reasoning to support your ideas. A supervising faculty member should collect these documents as part of the pre-production process of writing or other media literacy project.

Permissions and Licensing

If you're using copyrighted material for the same purpose as the original or otherwise do not feel that your use of the work qualifies for a fair use exemption, Pine Crest School recommends that you ask permission from the copyright holder. For amateur creations (independent musicians, Flickr photos, YouTube videos), send the creator an email requesting to use their work. Request permission by stating your purpose and describe how you're using their work, along with your name and full contact information. When using copyrighted work under Creative Commons licenses, you can simply use the work.

Public Domain

Public Domain refers to the expiration of the intellectual property right of a documented idea. This expiration occurs 70 years after the death of the last surviving creator of the work in question. For example, all of Shakespeare’s work, in its original published form, is in the public domain.

 

 Creative Commons

An alternative to the U.S. copyright system, created for the digital age. The Internet has transformed how students and faculty members collect, create, and present material to the world. Creative Commons allows creators to decide how they want their work to be shared and treated by others who use their work in different creative production and performance contexts.

Frequently Asked Questions

Here are some examples of how fair use reasoning can be applied to specific situations.

1.Can I use facts, information or quotes from a research paper, blog, news story or website?

Using small amounts of information, facts or quotes from copyrighted print materials is fair use. Identifying the source of the information shows good faith.

2. Can I use clips from YouTube or Hollywood movies in my academic or creative work? 

Using movie clips in a PCNN broadcast may be transformative since the clip is used a new context. If the clip's original purpose was to entertain, but you are using it to inform, that is transformative. However, if the original purpose of the clip was informative and you are using said clip for the same purpose that is less transformative. The amount of copyrighted material you use should be brief enough to illustrate your intended purpose for using the material in your project.

3. Can I use images or photos in my academic or creative work? 

Consider the original purpose of the work in relation to your use of it. For example, the purpose of a news photo is to provide information about news and current events. If you chose to use the photo for the same exact purpose, that choice is not quite transformative. If you are using the photo as an example or illustration, you may claim fair use. When you're using an image or photo for a different purpose than it was originally intended, you may claim fair use. Otherwise, you should ask permission and use the licensing process.

4. Can I use clips from popular music in my academic or creative work? 

The purpose of pop music is to entertain by creating a particular mood, feeling or emotion. If you are using the clip to accomplish this same goal, that is not transformative. However, if you are commenting or critiquing the music then that is a clear example of fair use. If you are using a short sample of a song as an illustration of a larger idea, you may claim fair use. But if you're merely exploiting the familiarity of the song to attract people's attention to your project, then you should ask permission of the creator (independent artist) and seek a license, if necessary (Warner Music recording artist).

5. Can I show my academic or creative work in the classroom or on the school closed-circuit network (i.e. on PCNN)?

If doing so is part of an educational experience, you can display your academic or creative work when it makes use of copyrighted materials.

6. Can I show my academic or creative work to the community on public access TV or at a public event?

When your work is transformative under the fair use standard, your new work is protected by copyright, and you can choose to distribute it in any way you want. When you use copyrighted materials in non-transformative ways (exhibiting a entertainment film at a fundraiser, for example), you should ask permission and seek a license.

 

 7.  When my academic or creative work uses copyrighted materials, can I post it to YouTube or somewhere else online? 

When your work is transformative under the fair use standard, your new work is protected by copyright, and you can choose to distribute it in any way you want. If your academic or creative work is removed from YouTube or another Internet Service Provider by a mechanized takedown process, you can claim fair use and have it reinstated.  

Resources for Royalty-Free Media:

Music:

Non-Stop Music (login required–email Educational Technology) http://www.nonstopmusic.com/us/homepage.aspx

Pictures:

Free Digital Pictures

http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/

 

Digital Media Copyright by Pine Crest School is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Based on a work at mediaeducationlab.com.


 

 Pine Crest School’s Guide to Understanding New Media Literacies

What are the “Four C’s” and why are they beneficial to the 21st century student?

 

Creativity

Think Creatively

Work Creatively with Others

 Implement Innovations

 

Source & additional resource information on Creativity:

http://www.p21.org/overview/skills-framework/262

 

Critical Thinking

Reason Effectively

Use Systems Thinking

Make Judgments and Decisions

Solve Problems

 

Source & additional resource information on Critical Thinking:

http://www.p21.org/overview/skills-framework/260

 

Communication 

Communicate Clearly

 

 

Collaboration 

Collaborate with Others

 

Source & additional resource information on Communication & Collaboration:

http://www.p21.org/overview/skills-framework/261

Systems Thinking 

Computer Programing, Game-Based Learning , & Projects

Core tenets of Systems Thinking

  1. Every system has a purpose within a larger system.
  2. All of a system's parts must be present for the system to carry out its purpose optimally.
  3. A system's parts must be arranged in a specific way for the system to carry out its purpose.
  4. Systems change in response to feedback. 
  5. Systems maintain their stability by making adjustments based on feedback.

Cerdit: Pegasus Communications Inc. http://www.pegasuscom.com/systems-thinking.html  


Educational Technology Goals - Faculty Worksheet                        

Name: _____________________________        

Educational Technologist: ______________________________

Campus:       Boca            Fort Lauderdale

Division:

Lower School

Middle School

Upper School

Grades Level(s):

GradeLevel(s):

Grade Level(s):

Content/Special Area:

Subject(s):

Department(s):

                                                                                                                                         Professional Goal:                                                                                                                                                   

                                                                                                          

                                                                                                                                                  

                                                                                                                                                  

                                                                                                                                                  

Personal Goal:                                                                                                                                                   

                                                                          

Progress checks:           Opening of school               Mid-year                             End of year