Michigan Physiological Society Abstract Submission

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    MPS is planning on providing awards and selecting abstracts for presentations. We are seeking support and participation from research mentors in this process. Please discuss this with your mentor before you submit your abstract. Thank you.
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    Abstract: Please limit Abstract body to 250 words. Paste Title, Authors, Body below.

    Use Arial font and 10 pt font for abstract and single spacing. Capitalize the title List the authors and their affiliations(Last name with initials for First and/or Middle Name) After one space, provide body of the abstract in the following manner. Include a statement of purpose/hypothesis and hypothesis. Include a statement of methods and materials used. Include a summary of results with sufficient detail and statistics if possible to support conclusion. Include a full statement of the conclusions. Example Abstract Format created in MS Word. Acute Slow-Paced Breathing Increases Periods of Sympathetic Nervous System Quiescence Michael Mozer1, Christopher Johnson1, B Gunnar Wallin2, N Charkoudian1, Michael Joyner1, and Erica Wehrwein3 1Mayo Clinic, Dept of Anesthesiology, Rochester, MN 2The Salgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden 3Michigan State University, Dept of Physiology, East Lansing, MI Slow-paced breathing is a simple strategy to reduce psychological stress. We tested the hypothesis that slow pace breathing would decrease muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Ten young, healthy males were studied. The subjects were instructed to rest supine and breath normally for 20 minutes (baseline). MSNA was measured using peroneal microneurography and all nerve activity data were analyzed 5 minutes into each stage for a steady state measurement. Statistical analysis was completed using one way RM ANOVA and Tukey’s posthoc analysis (reported mean±SEM). Average respiratory rate was 11.9 ± 1.1 breaths/min during baseline and 5.8 ± 0.7 breaths/min during slow-paced breathing. There was no significant difference from baseline compared to slow paced breathing in MSNA burst frequency (18.01±2.0 vs 18.04±2.40 bursts/min), burst incidence (31.2±4.01 vs. 30.4±3.80 bursts/100 heartbeats) or burst area (12.70±2.18 vs 13.02±1.98%). However, there was a change in the pattern of burst firing that has physiological relevance since there is a significant decrease in plasma norepinephrine, increase in blood flow, and a reduction in mean arterial pressure during these periods. There was a significant increase in quiescent periods between burst clusters during slow paced breathing from baseline (6.50±0.61 vs. 3.59±0.41 seconds). In addition, there was a significant increase in the number of burst/cluster (5.6± 0.8 vs 2.9± 0.38 bursts). The altered pattern of MSNA firing has important physiological implications despite no overall change in burst incidence.
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