Mathalicious Lessons by Unit/Topic
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Mathalicious Lessons in Units
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GUIDE TO TYPE OF LESSON
I = Intro: This lesson will make a good first lesson for the unit. It should be accessible to students without a formal understanding of the upcoming mathematics.
M=Middle: This lesson is a great mid-unit application after some (but not all) of the relevant mathematics has been introduced.
C=Culminating: This lesson is a particularly challenging application. Students will get the most out of it after they've built a strong conceptual foundation and some procedural fluency.
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UNITMATHALICIOUS LESSON
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GradeTopic & CCSSType
(see above)
TitleThe GistCCSS
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Gr 6Area, Surface Area, Volume

6.G.1, 6.G.2, 6.G.3, 6.G.4, 6.EE.2, 6.EE.4, 6.EE.6
IAdvertising, AgedHow much of what you see is advertising? Students use decomposition to calculate the areas of irregularly shaped billboards from Times Square in 1938 and 2015 and describe how much of the visual field is occupied by advertisements.5.NF.3, 6.G.1
6
MTricks of the Tray'dWhat's the best way to design a food tray? Students calculate the volumes of rectangular prisms and use that information to design a cafeteria tray that looks good and holds a balanced meal.6.G.2
7
CIce CubedWhat size ice cubes should you put in your drink? Students use surface area, volume, and rates to explore the relationship between the size of ice cubes and how good they are at doing their job: chilling.6.RP.3, 6.G.2
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Ratios and Proportional Relationships

6.RP.1, 6.RP.2, 6.G.1, 6.G.2
IJen RatioHow does the media affect our happiness? Students explore the concept of the jen ratio – the ratio of positive to negative observations in our daily lives – and use it to discuss how the media influences our experience of the world.6.RP.1, 6.RP.2
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MOverratedHow much confidence should you place in online ratings? Students use ratios and averages to explore the different ways products can be rated online.6.RP.1, 6.NS.5, 6.SP.5
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CLeonardo NumbersAre there numbers hidden in nature? Students use the Fibonacci Sequence and Golden Ratio to uncover the mathematical mysteries of the universe.6.RP.1
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Unit Rates and Percents

6.RP.2, 6.RP.3, 6.NS.8, 6.EE.9
IBig Foot ConspiracyShould people with small feet pay less for shoes? Students apply unit rates to calculate the cost per ounce for different sizes of Nike shoes, and use proportions to find out what would happen if Nike charged by weight.6.RP.2, 6.RP.3, 7.RP.3
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MNewTritional InfoHow long does it take to burn off food from McDonald's? Students use unit rates and proportional reasoning to determine how long they'd have to exercise to burn off different McDonald's menu items.6.RP.3, 6.NS.3
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CBeen Caught StealingHow hard is it to steal second base in baseball? Students use the Pythagorean Theorem and proportions to determine whether a runner will successfully beat the catcher's throw.6.RP.3, 8.G.7
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Operations with Fractions and Decimals


6.NS.1, 6.NS.6.c, 6.NS.2, 6.NS.3, 6.NS.4
IAre We Alone?What are the chances that we'll communicate with aliens? Students use fraction multiplication to explore the Drake Equation, the formula astronomers use to estimate the number of intelligent civilizations with whom we might communicate.4.NF.4
15
MCompomisedHow were free states and slave states represented in Congress? In this lesson, students use census data and fraction multiplication to explore the effects of the Three-Fifths Compromise on the balance of power between free and slave states in early America.6.NS.2
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CHarmony of NumbersWhy do certain pairs of notes sound better than others? Students use ratios and fraction division to explore what makes two notes sound good or bad when played together.6.RP.3, 6.SP.4, 7.SP.5, 7.SP.6, 7.SP.7
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6.5 Solving Equations and Inequalities

6.EE.1, 6.EE.2, 6.EE.3, 6.EE.4, 6.EE.5, 6.EE.6, 6.EE.7, 6.EE.8
IFamily TreeHow many ancestors do you have as you go back in time? Students use exponential growth to see how many people they're related to throughout human history.6.EE.1, 6.EE.2
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MCalories In, Calories OutHow many calories does a body burn? Students interpret and apply the formula for resting metabolic rate (RMR) in order to learn about how calories consumed from food, calories burned from exercise, and calories burned automatically contribute to a body's weight.6.RP.3, 6.EE.2
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CHi, BMIWhat's a healthy weight? Students evaluate the Body Mass Index (BMI) formula for several celebrities, and discuss whether BMI is always a good measure of health.6.EE.1, 6.EE.2, 6.EE.5
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Negative Numbers and Absolute Values

6.NS.5, 6.NS.6, 6.NS.7, 6.NS.8, 6.G.3, 6.EE.8
IOrigin StoriesHow can we compare similar items? Students plot points with positive and negative coordinates in order to compare items across two different attributes. They use the plots to decide which item is the “best” in different scenarios, and discuss whether or not negative numbers always represent the “opposite” of positive numbers.6.NS.5, 6.NS.6, 6.NS.8
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Statistics

6.SP.1, 6.SP.2, 6.SP.3, 6.SP.4, 6.SP.5
ITwo Left FeetShould shoe companies sell left and right shoes separately? Students collect survey and measurement data, construct bar graphs, and discuss distributions and measures of central tendency in order to figure out whether shoe companies should necessarily be selling their products in same-size pairs.6.SP.2, 6.SP.4, 6.SP.5
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MGrading Scales of JusticeHow should grades be calculated? Students use averages and weighted means to examine some different grading schemes and decide what other factors ought to be considered when teachers assign grades.6.SP.1, 6.SP.3
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CWealth of NationsHow is wealth distributed? Students use measures of center, five-number summaries, and box plots to examine different distributions while digging into one of the most important economic and political issues facing the nation.6.SP.3, 6.SP.4, 6.SP.5, 7.SP.4
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Gr 7Scale Drawings

7.RP.2, 7.G.1, 7.G.3, 7.G.6
ICartogra-failWhat does Earth really look like? Students approximate the areas of different landmasses by decomposing them into triangles and rectangles. They do this for two different maps, and debate whether or not the map you use affects how you see--both literally and figuratively--the world.7.G.1, 7.G.6
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MLayer Strands on MeHow do we view and create objects in 3D? Using MRI images, students study the connection between objects and their cross sections to understand 3D printing, its benefits, and its risks.7.G.3
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C1600 PennsylvaniaHow big is the White House? Students build scale models to determine the surface area and volume of America's most famous home.7.G.1, 7.G.6
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Operations with Negative Numbers

7.NS.A.1, 7.NS.A.2, 7.NS.A.3
IAbout TimeHow has the pace of technology changed over time? Students explore timelines of important technological milestones, and calculate the time between major events using absolute value and operations on integers.7.NS.1
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MIcy Hot (MS)How have temperatures changed around the world? Students compare current temperature to historical averages, and add and subtract positive and negative numbers to explore how the climate has changed in various cities over time.7.NS.1, 7.NS.3
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CCommon CentsHow much is money worth? Students apply operations on rational and decimal numbers to calculate how much the U.S. Mint spends on different coins, and discuss whether we really need all these coins.7.NS.2, 7.NS.3
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Proportional Relationships

7.RP.A.1, 7.RP.A.2, 7.RP.A.3, 7.EE.A.2 7.EE.B.3, 7.EE.B.4a, 7.EE.B.4b
INew TwentyHow does life expectancy affect how you live your life? Students use proportions to determine what life expectancy must have been in the past in order for the phrase "30 is the new 20" to be accurate, and explore how life might change as life expectancy changes.7.RP.1, 7.RP.2
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MText Me LaterHow dangerous is texting and driving? Students use proportional reasoning to determine how far a car travels in the time it takes to send a message, and explore the consequences of distracted driving.7.RP.3
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COn Your MarkDo taller sprinters have an unfair advantage? Students use proportions to find out what would happen if Olympic races were organized by height.7.RP.2, 7.RP.3
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Measuring Circles

7.G.B.4, 7.G.B.6, 7.RP.A.1, 7.RP.A.2
IAs the World Turns (MS)How fast is the Earth spinning? Students use unit rates to find the speed at which the planet rotates along the Equator, Tropic of Cancer, and Arctic Circle.6.RP.2, 6.RP.3, 6.EE.9
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MSpinning Your WheelsWhy do tires appear to spin backwards in some car commercials? Students apply unit rates and the formula for the circumference of a circle to determine what makes a spinning wheel sometimes look like it’s moving in the opposite direction of the car sitting on top of it.7.RP.3, 7.G.4
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CPizza PiWhich size pizza is the best deal? Is it ever a good idea to buy the personal pan from Pizza Hut? Students use unit rates and percents, and the area of a circle to explore the math behind pizza bargains.7.RP.1, 7.RP.2, 7.G.4
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Angles and Triangles

7.RP.A.3, 7.G.A.2, 7.G.A.3, 7.G.B.5
COMING SOON!
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Probability and Statistics

7.NS.A.3, 7.SP.A.1, 7.SP.A.2, 7.SP.B.3, 7.SP.B.4, 7.SP.C.5, 7.SP.C.6, 7.SP.C.7, 7.SP.C.8
IWheel of FortuneIs Wheel of Fortune rigged? Students use percents and probabilities to compare theoretical versus experimental probabilities, and explore whether the show is legit, or whether there might be something shady going on!6.RP.3, 6.SP.4, 7.SP.5, 7.SP.6, 7.SP.7
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MPair-AlysisHow many different shoes can you design on NIKEid? Students use the Fundamental Counting Principle to calculate how many color combinations are possible for the popular Nike Free Run running shoe, and also explore the "paralysis-by-analysis" that can come from too much choice.7.SP.8
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CWealth of NationsHow is wealth distributed? Students use measures of center, five-number summaries, and box plots to examine different distributions while digging into one of the most important economic and political issues facing the nation.6.SP.3, 6.SP.4, 6.SP.5, 7.SP.4
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Putting It All TogetherIMy Fellow AmericansHave presidential speeches gotten dumber? Students evaluate the Flesch-Kincaid formula with inputs from three different presidents and analyze the formula to predict how specific changes to a speech will impact its score.7.NS.3, 7.EE.3
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MLicensed to IllWho should buy health insurance? Students use percents and expected value to explore the mathematics of health insurance from a variety of perspectives.7.RP.3, 7.NS.3, 7.RP.5
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CScalpedWhen you buy a concert ticket, where does your money go? Students use percents and proportional reasoning to describe how revenue from tickets is distributed among the various players in the concert game.6.RP.3, 7.RP.3
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Gr 8Rigid Motions and Congruence

8.G.A.1a, 8.G.A.1b, 8.G.A.1c, 8.G.A.2, 8.G.A.3, 8.G.A.5
IBy DesignWhy do manmade objects look the way they do? Students analyze the symmetry of objects, use geometric reflections to construct symmetrical images of their own, and debate the nature of beauty and perfection.8.G.3
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CKey Board
How do you create simple video games? Students apply geometric transformations to build (and play) their own games.
8.G.2, 8.G.4, G.CO.5
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Dilations, Similarity, and Similar Triangles

8.G.A.1a, 8.G.A.1b, 8.G.A.1c, 8.G.A.2, 8.G.A.3. 8.G.A.4, 8.G.A.5
MTransformersWhat transformations do smartphones use? In this lesson, students identify and categorize the different transformations that occur when a user manipulates a smartphone screen. They also use on-screen coordinates to calculate the results of zooming within an application and to decide whether ponying up for a larger screen is worth it.
8.G.2, 8.G.3, 8.G.4
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Proportional Relationships, Lines, and Linear Equations

8.EE.B.5, 8.EE.B.6, 8.EE.C.7a
IDomino EffectHow much does Domino's charge for pizza? Students use linear functions — slope, y-intercept, and equations — to explore how much the famous pizzas really cost.8.EE.5, 8.F.3, 8.F.4, 8.F.5
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MCrop and TradeWhich crops should farmers grow? Students use linear relationships and proportional reasoning to explore comparative advantage and the risks and benefits of trade.8.EE.5, 8.EE.7
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CNot So FastHow should speeding tickets be calculated? Students use linear equations to explore how police officers determine speeding fines...and whether tickets are calculated fairly.8.EE.7, 8.F.2, 8.F.3, 8.F.4
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Systems of Equations

8.EE.C.7a, 8.EE.C.7b, 8.EE.C.8a, 8.EE.C.8b, 8.EE.C.8c
IFlicksWhich movie rental service should you choose? Students develop a system of linear equations to compare Redbox, AppleTV, and Netflix, and determine which is the best plan for them.8.EE.7, 8.EE.8, 8.F.3, 8.F.4
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MYou're So FinedHow long does it take to pay off municipal fines? Students use linear equations and solve linear systems to examine what happens when people are unable to pay small municipal fines. They also discuss what can happen to the most financially vulnerable citizens when cities rely heavily on fines for revenue.8.EE.8
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CHere Comes the SunAre solar panels worth the cost? Students set up and solve systems of linear equations to compare different electricity plans and determine when each option is the least expensive.8.EE.8
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Relationships in Data

8.EE.B.5, 8.EE.B.6, 8.EE.C.7a, 8.SP.1, 8.SP.2, 8.SP.3, 8.SP.4
IThe Biggest LoserHow should the winner of The Biggest Loser be chosen? Students model weight loss with linear equations, and use percent change to compare absolute and relative weight loss for several contestants. They also examine historical data to determine which method produces the fairer game.8.F.4, 8.SP.1, 8.SP.3
54
MReel DealHow has the length of popular movies changed over time? Students use scatterplots to examine linear and nonlinear patterns in data and make predictions about the future.8.SP.1, 8.SP.2, 8.SP.3
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CLet Down Your HairHow fast does hair grow? Students analyze a scatterplot, create a line of best fit, and interpret slope as the rate of hair growth over time.8.F.4, 8.SP.2, 8.SP.3
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Introduction to Functions

8.F.A.1, 8.F.A.2, 8.F.A.3, 8.F.B.4, 8.F.B.5
IWatch Your StepWhat should teacher salaries be based on? Students will use and compare linear functions to analyze how teacher pay is currently determined, and decide whether they would give merit-based pay an A+ or failing marks.8.F.2, 8.F.4, 8.F.5
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MIn the ZoneHow hard should you exercise? Students write and graph an equation for maximum heart rate in terms of age, and then calculate ideal heart rate zones for different types of workouts.8.F.3, 8.F.4
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CSweet ToothHow much is a piece of Halloween candy worth? Students interpret graphs to compare the marginal enjoyment and total enjoyment of two siblings feasting on piles of Halloween candy and figure out how much pleasure you get (or don't) from eating more and more.8.F.2, 8.F.3, 8.F.5
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Negative Exponents and Scientific Notation

8.EE.A.1, 8.EE.A.3, 8.EE.A.4
COMING SOON!
60
Square Roots and the Pythagorean Theorem

8.NS.1, 8.NS.2, 8.EE.2, 8.G.6, 8.G.7, 8.G.8
ISquare DancingWhat do squares reveal about the universe? Students learn about the Pythagoreans and explore how to square numbers and find square roots, confront the weirdness of irrational numbers, and discover what happens when people’s most fundamental beliefs are thrown into doubt.8.NS.18.NS.2
61
M51-Foot LadderHow high can a ladder safely reach? Students combine the federal guideline for ladder safety with the Pythagorean Theorem (middle school) or trigonometric ratios (high school) to explore how high you can really climb.8.G.7, G.SRT.8
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CViewmongousWhen you buy a bigger TV, how much more do you really get? Students use the Pythagorean Theorem and proportional reasoning to investigate the relationship between the diagonal length, aspect ratio, and screen area of a TV.8.G.7, G.SRT.8
63
Cubes, Cube Roots, and Beyond

8.G.B.7, 8.G.C.9, 8.EE.A.2
IBelly of the Beast Were megalodons godfathers of the sea? Students model the bodies of different sharks using cylinders, and explore how the volume of a cylinder changes when its dimensions change. They learn that the megalodon was a massive ocean beast, but that its size may ultimately have led to its downfall.8.G.9
64
MPony UpHow do you increase the horsepower of a car engine? Students calculate the volumes of different car cylinders, and explore ways to make engine even more powerful by changing the dimensions of an engine's internal geometry.8.G.9
65
CCheese That Goes CrunchWhich is better: crunchy or puffy Cheetos? Students calculate the surface area : volume ratio for each snack to determine which one tastes cheesier.8.G.9, G.GMD.3, G.MG.1
66
AlgOne Variable Statistics

S.ID.1, S.ID.2, S.ID.3, S.ID.5
IGood Cop, Bad CopHow should cities address excessive force by police? Students compare two distributions of complaints against police officers. They analyze the fraction of complaints that officers are responsible for and evaluate the effectiveness of policy proposals in each scenario.S.ID.1, S.ID.2, S.ID.3
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MPolice AcademyHow much should states spend on schools and police? Students analyze histograms and use mean and median to explore state spending habits. Then, they discuss how much they think states should be spending.S.ID.2, S.ID.1, S.ID.3
68
CDistributive PropertiesHave income distributions in the U.S. improved over time? Students compare percentages of total income earned by different subgroups of the working population and decide whether or not the “American Dream” is equally achievable by all Americans.S.ID.2, S.ID.3, S.ID.5
69
Linear Equations and Inequalities

A.REI.1, A.REI.3, A.REI.5, A.REI.6, A.REI.12, F.LE.2, F.LE.5, A.CED.1, A.CED.2, A.CED.3
IWage WarHow much should companies pay their employees? Students graph and solve systems of linear equations in order to examine the effects of wage levels on labor and consumer markets, and they discuss the possible pros and cons of increasing the minimum wage.A.REI.6, F.LE.2, F.LE.5
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MDatelinesWhat's an acceptable dating range? Students use linear equations and linear inequalities to examine the May-December romance, and ask whether the Half Plus Seven rule of thumb is a good one.A.CED.1, A.CED.3, A.REI.3, A.REI.12, F.BF.4
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CFinancial AidGoing to college can be expensive, but can also lead to a higher income. So how much more do graduates earn, and is college worth the cost? Students use systems of linear equations to compare different educational options.8.EE.5, 8.EE.8, 8.F.2, A.CED.3, A.REI.11, F.LE.5
72
Bivariate Statistics

S.ID.6, S.ID.6b, S.ID.7, S.ID.8, S.ID.9, S.ID.3, F.IF.6
ILet Down Your HairHow fast does hair grow? Students analyze a scatterplot, create a line of best fit, and interpret slope as the rate of hair growth over time.8.F.4, 8.SP.2, 8.SP.3
73
MPic MeHow can you become popular on Instagram? Students use linear regression models and correlation coefficients to evaluate whether having more followers, posts, and hashtags actually make pictures more popular on Instagram.S.ID.6, S.ID.7
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CWin at Any CostHow should sports teams spend their money to win more games? Students look at data for four major pro sports leagues to find out whether it's possible to buy wins.S.ID.6, S.ID.7, S.ID.8, S.ID.9
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Functions

F.IF.1, F.IF.2, F.IF.3, F.IF.4, F.IF.5, F.IF.6, F.IF.7, F.IF.7.b, F.BF.4a
IDecoder RingWhat are some ways to encrypt secret messages? Students explore function concepts using ciphers to encrypt messages both graphically and algebraically; they try to decrypt some messages too. In the end, they'll learn what makes for a useful cipher, and what makes a cipher impossible to decode.8.F.1, F.IF.1, F.BF.4
76
MIt's a DateHow can we improve our calendar? Students examine some other ways to keep track of dates, and use number sense and function concepts to convert between different calendars.8.F.1, F.IF.1, F.IF.2, F.BF.1
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CCarpe DonutHow much should people pay for donuts? Students use linear, rational, and piecewise functions to describe the total and average costs of an order at Carpe Donut.F.iF.5, F.IF.6, F.IF.7, F.BF.1
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Exponential Functions I

F.LE.1, F.LE.1a, F.LE.1c, F.LE.2, F.LE.3, F.LE.5, F.IF.7e, F.IF.4, F.BF.1a, A.CED.1, F.IF.8b
IBillions and BillionsHow has the human population changed over time? Students build an exponential model for population growth, and use it to make predictions about the future of our planet.F.IF.7, F.BF.1, F.BF.2, F.LE.1, F.LE.5
79
MiPod dPreciationHow has the iPod depreciated over time? Students compare linear and exponential decay, as well as explore how various products have depreciated and what might account for those differences.A.CED.1, F.IF.8, F.LE.1, F.LE.2, F.LE.5, F.LE.4
80
CI RememberHow much can you trust your memory? Students construct and compare linear and exponential models to explore how much a memory degrades each time it's remembered.A.REI.11, F.IF.4, F.LE.2
81
Quadratic Functions

A.SSE.1, A.CED.2, F.IF.4, F.IF.6, F.IF.7a, F.BF.1a, F.BF.3, F.LE.3
IFall of JavertCould Inspector Javert have survived the fall? Students use quadratic models to determine how high the bridge was in Les Misérables, and how fast Javert was traveling when he hit the water.A.CED.1, F.IF.6, F.IF.7, F.BF.1
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MConnectedHow valuable is a social network? Students create a quadratic function to model the number of possible connections as more people sign up, and discuss who gets the most value out of large social networks.A.CED.1, F.IF.7, F.BF.1
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CPrescriptedHow should pharmaceutical companies decide what to develop? In this lesson, students use linear and quadratic functions to explore how much pharmaceutical companies expect to make from different drugs, and discuss ways to incentivize companies to develop medications that are more valuable to society.A.CED.2, F.IF.4, F.IF.7, F.BF.3, F.LE.1, F.LE.5
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Quadratic Equations and Roots

A-CED.1, 4, A-REI.1, 4a,b, 7, A-SSE.2,3a-b, F-IF.8a
IWiiBatesHow much should Nintendo charge for the Wii U? Students use linear functions to explore demand for the Wii U console and Nintendo's per-unit profit from each sale. They use those functions to create a quadratic model for Nintendo's total profit and determine the profit-maximizing price for the console.
85
MPizza Pi (HS)Which size pizza should you order? Students apply the area of a circle formula to write linear and quadratic formulas that measure how much of a pizza is actually pizza, and how much is crust.
86
COut of Left FieldIn which MLB ballpark is it hardest to hit a home run? Students find the roots and maxima of quadratic functions to model the trajectory of a potential home-run ball.A.CED.1, A.CED.4, A.REI.4, F.IF.7
87
GeomRigid Transformations

G-CO.1, G-CO.2, G-CO.3, G-CO.4, G-CO.5, G-CO.10, G-CO.12, G-CO.13
IKey Board
How do you create simple video games? Students apply geometric transformations to build (and play) their own games.
8.G.2, 8.G.4, G.CO.5
88
MBlindsidedWhat's the best way to position a car's mirrors? Students use reflections and congruent angles to determine the best orientation for rear- and side-view mirrors, and learn how to correct those dangerous blind spots.8.G.1
89
CFace ValueHow symmetrical are faces? Students apply their understanding of line reflections to develop a metric for facial symmetry.G.CO.4, G.CO.5
90
Congruence

G-CO.6, G-CO.7, G-CO.8, G-CO.9, G-CO.10, G-CO.11, G-GPE.7
COMING SOON!
91
Similarity

G-CO.10, G-SRT.1, G-SRT.2, G-SRT.3, G-SRT.4, G-SRT.5, G-C.1, G-GPE.5, G-GPE.6
COMING SOON!
92
Right Triangle Trig

G-SRT.6, G-SRT.7, G-SRT.8
IViewmongousWhen you buy a bigger TV, how much more do you really get? Students use the Pythagorean Theorem and proportional reasoning to investigate the relationship between the diagonal length, aspect ratio, and screen area of a TV.8.G.7, G.SRT.8
93
M51-Foot LadderHow high can a ladder safely reach? Students combine the federal guideline for ladder safety with the Pythagorean Theorem (middle school) or trigonometric ratios (high school) to explore how high you can really climb.8.G.7, G.SRT.8
94
CSharper ImageShould you buy a camera lens with vibration reduction? Students interpret graphs and use right triangle trigonometry to explore the relationship between focal length, viewing angle, and blurriness.A.SEE.1, A.CED.2, G.SRT.8
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Measurement and Solid Geometry

G-GMD.1, G-GMD.3, G-GMD.4, G-MG.1
IPony UpHow do you increase the horsepower of a car engine? Students calculate the volumes of different car cylinders, and explore ways to make engine even more powerful by changing the dimensions of an engine's internal geometry.8.G.9
96
MCheese That Goes CrunchHow high can a ladder safely reach? Students combine the federal guideline for ladder safety with the Pythagorean Theorem (middle school) or trigonometric ratios (high school) to explore how high you can really climb.8.G.7, G.SRT.8
97
CCanalysisWhat's the ideal size for a soda can? Students use the formulas for surface area and volume of a cylinder to design different cans, calculate their cost of production, and find the can that uses the least material to contain a standard 12 ounces of liquid.A.CED.1, A.CED.4, F.IF.7, G.MG.1, G.MG.3
98
Circles

G.CO.1,G.CO.10, G.CO.12,G.C.2, G.C.3, G.C.5, G.SRT.5, G.MG.1, G.MG.3, G.GPE.1
ITriplets of CellvilleHow do cell phone towers identify your location? Students describe geometrically the location information provided by a cell phone tower, explain why loci from at least three towers are required to pinpoint a customer's location, and consider the tradeoff between coverage and "locatability" when a phone company chooses a new tower location.G.CO.1, G.MG.3
99
MAxle RoadsHow do vehicles turn? In this lesson, students use the geometry of circles to understand how we get from point A to point B when the path isn't a straight one.G.MG.1, G.MG.3, G.C.5
100
CAs the World Turns (HS)How fast is the Earth spinning? Students use rates, arc length, and trigonometric ratios to determine how fast the planet is spinning at different latitudes.G.SRT.8, G.C.5
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