Integration Symposium 2013 Registration

SPEAK TO ME THAT I MAY HEAR: CLINICAL WORK WITH EVANGELICALS IN TRANSITION Dr. Marie Hoffman is our honored speaker for the 2013 Fuller Symposium on the Integration of Psychology and Theology, taking place on Feb. 13 & 14, 2013. The symposium is free and open to the public. Up to 6 hours of Continuing Education is available for a fee. Lecture 1 - WITNESSING: WHERE IT ALL BEGINS (2 CEs) Wednesday, Feb 13, 10am - 12pm Travis Auditorium Many Evangelical patients report having come to Christ by being "witnessed to”. Witness was the starting point. It is the starting point of psychotherapy as well. The psychotherapist's first task is to witness the evangelical patient's untold or dismissed narrative of pain, and bear witness to the transformation that a wounded healer embodies. Attendees will be able to describe the psychological liabilities of a truncated understanding of witnessing, to theoretically link the clinical practice of witnessing to the concept of mutual recognition, and to apply the practice of witnessing into psychotherapeutic work with struggling evangelical Christians. Lecture 2 - SALVATION: FROM BY AND BY, TO HERE AND THERE (2 CEs) Wednesday, Feb. 13, 7pm - 9pm Travis Auditorium Evangelical patients largely equate salvation with an escape from hell’s torments. More often, the evangelical patient is seeking escape from more present, internal torments. A psychotherapy that understands this disjuncture may facilitate a more experience-near comprehension of salvation as one that frees from bondage to the iniquities of the fathers, and begins the heavenly kingdom here. Attendees will be able to describe the psychological liabilities of a truncated understanding of salvation, to theoretically link the psychoanalytic concept of “attachment to bad objects” with the religious concept of a need for salvation, and apply an expanded understanding of salvation to therapeutic work with struggling evangelical Christians. Lecture 3 - CONVERSION: FROM WHAT? TO WHAT? (2 CEs) Thursday, Feb. 14, 10am - 12pm Travis Auditorium Evangelical patients often refer to conversion as a synonym for salvation. Hope-giving potential lies in the interpreting of conversion as a gradual transformation of investment from the original trauma to a redeployment of energies toward redemptive purposes. Evangelical patients who have experienced emotional healing can begin to experience areas of trauma as areas of strength that render them more exquisitely attuned. Attendees will be able to describe the psychological liabilities of a truncated understanding of conversion, to theoretically link the psychoanalytic concept of transformation of trauma to the redemptive concept of conversion, and apply the expanded understanding of conversion into psychotherapeutic work with struggling evangelical Christians.















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