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TitleDescriptionPresentersDateTimeLengthRoomBroadcast? (Yes/No)Broadcast Location (e.g. http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/learn )

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Using Virtual Communities to Support Volunteer RetentionResearch shows that volunteers who have strong relationships with program staff and with other volunteers are more likely to continue volunteering in their role. However, with reduced resources and cultural shifts that make face-to-face activities harder to sustain, it can be difficult to maintain the same level of relatedness previously afforded to Extension volunteer programs. The advent of Web 2.0 tools offers staff an opportunity to support volunteers in new ways using technology. This session will describe a research study that examined the ways in which an online community housed in eXtension supported volunteer relationships. We will explore the benefit to contributing to the community through conversation and participating more passively through reading the conversations of others. Participants will characteristics of volunteers who flourished in this environment as well as critical components necessary for a virtual community to flourish.Molly Frendo10/2/201210:30:0045Meeting Room 1No

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Private (Practice) Meets Communities of Practice We often think of communities of practices being made up of educators and researchers from land-grant universities. Some communities of practices have members from the military or from government agencies. In this session, we will give an example of how an individual with his own business connected with Military Families Learning Network and Network Literacy Community of Practice and how all involved have benefited. While both communities of practices value contributions of the public, Jerry is regular contributor. We will begin our discussion by explaining how Jerry Buchko first connected to these two communities of practices. Then we will describe how he connects and contributes. We will also explore how his involvement has provided benefits to him, his private practice, and these two communities of practices’ work and activities. We will conclude the session by giving ideas for other communities of practice to open their membership to others outside of education and government.Jerry Buchko10/2/201210:30:0045Meeting Room 2No

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Co-Parenting for Successful Kids On LineIn 2012, The Nebraska Supreme Court approved the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension online class “Co-Parenting For Successful Kids” because it is a hardship for some parents to participate in an in-person class. Since 2008, in-person classes have been mandated for parents experiencing custody/divorce issues. Nebraska Extension teamed up with eXtension and Nebraska Education Television (NET) to develop the class. Parents have 30 days to take the 3-hour class. The official certificate needed by the court is emailed to the participant within three working days of class completion. Cost is $50 per person and includes video instruction, interactive pages, and chapter reviews. Content is University research-based and includes experiences gained by teaching 8,200 parents in person since 1999. During the first five months, over 200 parents have graduated. Evaluation is in process, including six-month follow-up. Preliminary follow up data will be available in October 2012. Initial participant feedback includes comments such as “I really learned how badly divorce and separation could affect the children”; “This is the first parenting class I have ever had.” The eXtension presentation will include lessons learned related to working with multiple Extension partners which are transferrable to broader users.Cynthia Strasheim10/2/201210:30:0045Meeting Room 3No

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Implementing Ask an Expert: Three Different States...Three Different DrummersNorth Carolina State University, Oregon State University, and The Ohio State University have all launched eXtension’s Ask an Expert (AaE) widget statewide. But each chose to march on a different path to implement the system, using different approaches to wrangling questions, rewarding responders, using volunteers, and promotion. This session will provide brief overviews from each state along with time for discussion and questions. Participants will be exposed to contrasting ways of using AaE and technology to reach clientele online, and encouraged to find the best fit for implementing the system in their state.Jerry Thomas10/2/201210:30:0045Meeting Room 4No

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Living Social: Getting the Most Out of Your Social Media NetworksBack in 2010, the Alabama Cooperative Extension System’s Backyard Wisdom was a solid little radio show that needed to be active in social media. Backyard Wisdom’s host, Maggie Lawrence, is a communications specialist with a passion for gardening. It was clear to her that to get the most social media has to offer you have to do more than dip your toe in the pool. You have to jump in and join the party. For the last two years, Maggie has been living in the social media world using outlets such as blogging, podcasts, Twitter and Facebook. Recently, she has added Pinterest, Google+ and other tools to her toolbox. The results are clear: a more than 300 percent increase in visits to the Backyard Wisdom website in 2011 from 2010. Data from the first half of 2012 shows significant growth over 2011. The difference between 2010 and the last two years? How often and how effectively social media was used to promote the site. These uses of social media have enabled Extension to share research‐based information to a much broader audience than was originally being reached when Backyard Wisdom existed solely as a radio program.
In this session, Maggie Lawrence will share tools and tips that have helped make the Backyard Wisdom social media effort a success. Specifically, she will talk about the importance of living in the social media community that you are trying to reach rather than being the 21st century town crier who shouts a message and then disappears until there is a new message to be broadcast.
This session will show you how living in your social media world can generate significant and documentable results.
Maggie Lawrence10/2/201210:30:0045Meeting Room 14No

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Working Smart/Teaching Smart with Smart PhonesThis session will demonstrate and explain three free and easy Smart phone tools Extension educators can use both to streamline work and use with clients. Presenters will describe their experiences with all three in Extension work. Quick Response Codes are a useful tool, both for marketing programs and as a new method for providing information for stakeholders. Flyers, brochures, business cards, and door signs can contain codes that smart phone users can scan to access additional information—and analytics track the number of users. Expensify is a free PC and mobile app to streamline recording of expenses by scanning receipts, mapping to track and record mileage, and analyze expenses. Clients of all kinds who track expenses, whether agriculture or small business-related would also find this app a useful tool. The square is a small device that turns a smart phone or ipad into a credit card reader. Low transaction costs (2.75%), and the ability to take payments anywhere make this free device perfect for accepting credit card payments for books, field days, programs, and other revenue-generating activities. Payments hit the bank the next business day. These three smart phone tools can increase efficiency and effectiveness of Extension educators.Kathryn Macomber10/2/201210:30:0045Meeting Room 5No

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The AGR-Lite Wizard: Case Study of the Value of Interactive Software Tools for Farmer and RanchersAssessing complicated topics like federally subsidized crop insurance, federal conservation programs, farm taxation and financial management can be very difficult for farmers. Also, person-to-person explanation of complicated topics can be expensive in terms of both government agency staff and farmers time and travel commitments. Can interactive software tools be created that assist farmers with such complicated topics? Are their important lessons that can be learned from the process of software tool development that assures farmers will use the tools developed? This working smarter case study will present the challenges and benefits of software tool development in making complex topics more easily understood and manageable for farmers and ranchers. Based on the idea of Turbo Tax which is used for federal and state individual tax filing, the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) with support from the USDA Risk Management Agency (RMA) developed a unique software tool called the Adjusted Gross Revenue Lite (AGR-Lite) Wizard. This tool has been very successful in helping agricultural producers assess the multiple risks of farming and understanding a complicated crop insurance product. The presentation will include a demonstration of the AGR-Lite Wizard tool as well as the important story of its development.Jeff Schahczenski10/2/201210:30:0045Meeting Room 15No

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Marketing Ask an Expert Once folks understand what it is, Ask an Expert is an easy sell. But are you marketing it effectively to build your program? This session will explore a variety of creative ways to market Ask an Expert both internally and externally. We’ll share examples of marketing plans, and how to build a branded identity. We’ll also demonstrate how we are using video, radio PSAs, brochures, flyers, press releases, presentations, and social media—and even lip balm– to get the word out. What worked? What didn’t? What could the future hold? We’ll give you several easy-to-initiate take home ideas for marketing Ask an Expert in your state. We’ll also discuss how we might share marketing resources. So come prepared to share your efforts and ideas about creatively marketing Ask an Expert!Jeff Hino10/2/201211:30:0045Meeting Room 1Yeshttp://connect.extension.iastate.edu/learn

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Animal Agriculture Management for a Changing Climate – Using New Ways of Educating Extension Agents Like humans, production animals are prone to the impacts of climate change, and methods are being researched for producers to decrease their relative contribution of greenhouse gases. A national team of extension educators is developing a web-based educational course to provide extension agents and educators with the knowledge and tools to work with their clients on adaptation and mitigation practices to help livestock and poultry producers cope with the changing climate. The educational modules are web-based using the Moodle platform and include introductory materials followed by specie & region specific information on how farmers and ranchers deal with changing climate and animal management. Each course module includes presentations, voice over commentary, video, interactive participation, certification test, downloadable extension materials, links for further reading, and complete bibliography. The presenter(s) will discuss methods used for developing a national curriculum that is locally accessible and relevant, demonstrate selected course materials, and provide opportunities for audience input on course improvement.Gary Hawkins10/2/201211:30:0045Meeting Room 2No

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Back to the Kitchen = Back to Education; how a social media campaign could pave the way for future “programming”The Back to the Kitchen social media campaign, which focused on utilizing social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter to educate the online public about the importance of family mealtime and how to realistically increase cooking and healthy eating habits at home, took place in September, 2012 during National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. The purpose of the campaign was two-fold; 1) to increase the online impact and publicity Ohio State University Extension has with the general public while providing them with information on a timely subject and 2) to serve as a professional development opportunity for Ohio State University Extension Family & Consumer Science professionals who were interested in learning more about utilizing social media as a program tool or taking their existing knowledge of social media to the next level.
This breakout session will explore the planning and development process behind the campaign, as well as the experience of implementation during the month of September – from both the campaign director and participant perspectives. This session will focus on how to use various social media tools to conduct a program-area-wide campaign on a specific topic. Come ready to discuss how educating the public in this manor could affect the traditional definition of “programming” in our field.
Jamie Seger10/2/201211:30:0045Meeting Room 3No

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We Need You to be a Question Wrangler! Questions are submitted from every state to eXtension’s Ask an Expert. Finding the best person to answer promptly may be easy for those who know who’s who in their state and subject matter, but harder from someone across the country. We need one or more people from each state to help as Question Wranglers. This session will be a panel of active Question Wranglers talking about what they do and how they do it. Come see what it takes and how you can get involved!
Question Wranglers are volunteers that monitor the incoming questions to the eXtension Ask an Expert system and route them to an appropriate subject matter expert for answering. Wranglers also take responsibility for monitoring whether questions from the public have been answered in a timely manner, follow-up with experts to make sure questions are being answered, and where necessary reassign questions to other experts. We QWs do our work at Ask an Expert (aae.extension.org). We hold monthly Question Wrangler Meetups usually on the 4th Tuesday of each month. Join us!
Bob Falconer, Emily L. Tipton, Rebecca Finneran, Ann LaVigna, Beth Raney10/2/201211:30:0045Meeting Room 4No

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Using Social Media in Disaster Recovery: Missouri ExamplesSocial media has a niche area of informing people during and after a disaster. The first successful large scale use of social media after a disaster was in Joplin after an F5 tornado totally destroyed 1/3 of the city of Joplin on May 22, 2011. Traditional methods of communications were destroyed. However, texting and wireless Internet service was accessible through smart phones. MU Extension assisted in developing the Facebook page joplintornadoinfo. The page was set up two hours after the tornado and still serves as a major link for people to communicate and share information with the 48,000+ followers of the page. This same model was then used as flooding approached northwest MO with MoFloodInfo and when Branson was hit on leap day 2012 (there are still over 17,000 followers of BransonTornadoInfo). This presentation will share the successes of these sites and how MU Extension responded then and continues to work with volunteers in managing these pages. Participants can also get a copy of “Using Social Media in Disaster Recovery.” This MU Extension publication has been distributed by FEMA, received national media coverage, and has been downloaded over 10,000 times since it became available in March of 2012.David Burton10/2/201211:30:0045Meeting Room 14No

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Collaborating with Google AppsGoogle Apps (which you can login to with your eXtensionID@extension.org and your eXtension password) makes it very easy to collaborate with others. With Google Apps, you can share and simultaneously edit documents, spreadsheets, presentations and more. You can also share calendars. With any of these, you can give some people view privileges and others full editing privileges. Just think how powerful it could be to never have to send an email attachment again, everyone seeing the current version of the project. Or imagine if you could let your colleagues see when you are busy or available and create and share project calendars.John Dorner10/2/201211:30:0045Meeting Room 5No

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Farmers, Ranchers, Social Media: Where Are They and How Do I Find Them? 3x3 Methods to Discover, Learn, and Successfully EngageAmericans are increasing their use of the internet for news and information, with approximately 4 out of 5 adults using the Internet and nearly half of all adults using a smartphone. In production agriculture this means there are approximately 2.4 million farmers and ranchers on the Internet and about 1.5 million with smartphones. Additionally, more than 80% of large producers are connected with broadband, providing the ability to receive lots of information and make faster decisions. Roughly half the principal farm operators are over 45 years old. Conversely, just under half the principle operators are under 45 years old and their numbers are growing. How do you find them online, engage them to learn their needs, and provide them impactful solutions? This session offers three tools and three processes that can help improve your approach to: discovering an audience, developing a dialog with them, creating solutions for their problems, and measuring outcomes.John Blue10/2/201211:30:0045Meeting Room 15No

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Sticky Messages: Six Principles for Developing Memorable PresentationEvery educator knows that attendees rapidly forget large amounts of the information provided in lectures.. How can one create “sticky” teaching messages that will be both memorable and useful to learners? In this session, six principles from the book Made to Stick (Heath & Heath, 2008) will be adapted to a teaching and learning environment both in-classroom and online through a host of relevant examples and problems. Instructors can make repeated use of these principles to guide and conduct their teaching in any discipline.Kristen Mastel10/2/201215:45:0045Meeting Room 1Yeshttp://connect.extension.iastate.edu/learn

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Games, Simulations and Interactives: Strategies for Designing eXtension Learning ToolsIn eXtension, our clientele depend on our collective expertise in a number of different ways — such as reference material when they search a topic online or as training resources for teaching others. However, eXtension can also serve as the knowledge base for engaging games and tools. Jeanne Gleason and Barbara Chamberlin will share the ways in which their games, interactive programs and simulations have impacted Extension clientele by presenting learning environments, increasing knowledge and changing attitudes of users. They will share processes for designing, budgeting and integrating tools with our extension CoP work.Jeanne Gleason10/2/201215:45:0045Meeting Room 2No

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Extension Through Applications, a New Business ModelSometime over the next year, more Internet content will be accessed by mobile devices than by desktop platforms. This transformation marks the latest technological and societal paradigm shift to confront Extension. In this session, we will explore how Extension at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln positioned itself to develop mobile applications that effectively deliver research and education to consumers in a constantly changing technological environment. Topics include: developing a mobile content strategy (video, web and social media), understanding your options to select the right solution(s), setting best practices for working with educators, determining infrastructure requirements, assessing potential pitfalls and navigating distribution networks.Brandon Schulte10/2/201215:45:0045Meeting Room 3No

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Institutional Team RoundtableWhile we meet every month, this will give members of Institutional Teams who attend the NeXC a chance to share, network, and learn from each other. Bring your ideas and an open mind as we look to our peers for strategies, tactics, and plans that worked in various institutions. We can all use a fresh perspective!Terry Meisenbach10/2/201215:45:0045Meeting Room 4No

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Social Media Evaluation 101Social media can be a powerful tool for Extension educators to expand their reach and engage with clients. Communities of practice and state systems are increasingly using Facebook, Twitter, and other social media as part of their programming efforts. This presents challenges for program evaluation as traditional evaluation methods rely on information not always available in social media. This session situates social media in the context of program evaluation and offers tips and suggestions for evaluating social media activities. Emphasis will be placed on tools to help measure reach and engagement through social media.Sarah Baughman10/2/201215:45:0045Meeting Room 14No

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Ask an Expert 2.0Ask an Expert (AaE) has been rethought and rebuilt from the ground up. Come learn about the new version. We’ll cover a bunch of new features such as the introduction of groups, tagging, widgets and forms, simpler routing and assignments, plus one of the biggest changes — the ability to share questions and answers publicly at the new Ask site. There will also be time for a Q&A and feedback on the app.Ben MacNeill10/2/201215:45:0045Meeting Room 5No

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The Open Science and It's Implications for the Future of Cooperative Extension Extension educators and professionals intuitively understand that we will be called upon to build new models to compete and survive in this new communication and economic order. The question remains: How? What should these models be and how should they function? Part of the answer may lie with open science, which portends the greatest change to scientific inquiry and research since Roger Bacon first began articulating a vision for systematic empirical investigation in the 13th century. A panel composed of several Extension employees with unique professional perspectives will discuss this emerging trend and both its promise and peril for the future of Cooperative Extension.Jim Langcuster10/2/201215:45:0045Meeting Room 15No

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Getting started with Google+Launched June 28, 2011, Google+ is a social networking service provided by Google, Inc. As a social network, Google+ shares traits (ability to share updates, links, photos, and videos) with other large social networks like Twitter and Facebook. Whether it’s connecting with colleagues and friends, finding topical information, or discovering new people with shared interests, Google+ is an amazing tool for building your online network. If you’re not sure what Google+ is, check out our Google+, what’s the fuss? blog post from last year. (http://bit.ly/gpluswhatsthefuss) This session will provide an introduction to Google+ with a focus on creating your account, completing your profile, and beginning to use the many features Google+ has to offer. It may be helpful to you to create a Google+ account before the session. We’ve posted instructions in this publicly accessible document: Google+ sign-up instructions (http://bit.ly/gplussignupinstructions)Stephen Judd10/3/20129:45:0045Meeting Room 1Yeshttp://connect.extension.iastate.edu/learn

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Eco-Family Virtual ConferenceHealthy Environments = Healthy People! Imagine learning sustainable living at your kitchen table and your teacher is on his own front porch! After a failed attempt to hold a face-to-face weekend sustainability conference for families in rural Iowa, Extension Family specialists opted for a virtual conference using Adobe Connect to reach people statewide. We converted the original conference topics and speakers into 6 monthly broadcast presentations. The 90-minute sessions featured experts in Local Food Systems, Connecting with Nature, Green Schools, Rainscaping, Edible Landscapes and Compost 101. Anchored in family development theory, the sustainability theme resonated with a variety of audiences. Twenty-three families from 9 urban and rural counties engaged in the monthly discussions focused on healthy people, environments and economies. Evaluations indicate increased knowledge and skills relating to environment and human health including human ecological footprints, and improved familial wellbeing. The interactive sessions included virtual breakout rooms, chats, note pods, polls, videos and microphone/headsets for participatory learning. Sessions were recorded and archived for participants who could not attend or for those who wanted to re-view the material. Extension offices were available for those with limited access to internet. Focus groups are enthusiastically designing the next virtual conference series.Kristi Cooper10/3/20129:45:0045Meeting Room 2No

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KY Natural Resource Environmental Science Academy (NRESci) Two students with high academy ability and interest in Natural Resources and Environmental Science will be selected from each of 8 eastern Kentucky counties at the end of their 6th grade year to participate in a challenging 3 year Natural Resource and Environmental Sciences Academy (NRESci). The program curriculum will be designed to integrate basic natural science concepts, with field data collection techniques and data interpretation to assess the environmental sustainability of various land use management decisions on a watershed basis. First year scholars will study Water Resources. Second year scholars will study Forest Resources and Third year scholars will study Wildlife Resources. Students will meet quarterly with program faculty and staff to report back on special assignments they conduct within their home counties and to visit research faculty on the UK campus. In addition, this program is working closely with the UK Robinson Scholar’s program to match “mentors” at the college level from the same region with the NRESci Academy scholar’s utilizing their “community service” component to keep connected and support youth from the same region. We are trying to bridge the “gap” from 4-H middle school age youth from eastern Kentucky region to college.Jann Burks10/3/20129:45:0045Meeting Room 3No

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Digital Information Brokers: Preparing Front-line Support Staff to Find and Direct Others to Online ResourcesCounty support staff members have long been the ‘face’ of our Extension systems. They are the first people the public interacts with when visiting an Extension office or the first voice heard when someone calls with a question. With fewer Educators/Agents covering more territory, these county-based staff members often have no one to turn to with questions. To better prepare Michigan State University Extension support staff to help clients find information and answers, a one-hour hands-on training in Adobe Connect was developed and offered to over 80 county and campus staff members in small groups. They practiced asking questions, searching for information, and finding experts using features of eXtension and MSUE. This session will describe the process used in Adobe Connect and the short term outcomes of the trainings. It will also serve as a forum for others to share creative ways their states have dealt with shrinking human resources and expanding needs for knowledge and information at the local level. A handout will be shared with screen shots of the adobe connect layouts used. Another handout called “Finding Information in eXtension: A Guide for Support Staff” will also be shared.Lela Vandenberg10/3/20129:45:0045Meeting Room 4No

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Where are We Getting the Hits? A Google Analytics StudyUsing data from Google Analytics, we look into factors that are associated with article and Ask an Expert (AaE) page views. Specifically, we utilize Google Analytics data from April 2009 – April 2012 and available Page Analytics (http://pageanalytics.extension.org/) in the personal finance or Financial Security for All (FSA) Community of Practice (CoP) areas. Top 25 articles and AaE with the highest page views per month will be selected to look for similar characteristics among these webpages. At the macro level, we will be exploring relevant statistics to our CoP such as search engine utilized, top search keywords, traffic sources, traffic referral, and mobile device access. We will be also be looking into the tendency of page hits associated with the following factors: newsletter, curriculum, number of words, topic (tag), average Google search entrances per week, age of the article, and its seasonal nature (month, quarter). We share result implications and limitations based on the results of this studyFahzy Abdul-Rahman10/3/20129:45:0045BiltmoreNo

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Curating Content with Scoop.itScoop.it! is a curation platform that enables users to collect news, articles, and other online sources, and share them on a custom-themed Scoop.it! site. I have been curating content on the Working Differently in Extension Scoop.it! site for more than a year. I’ll introduce you to Scoop.it! and share my experiences curating on the platform.Bob Bertsch10/3/20129:45:0045Meeting Room 5No

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Silos Aren’t Just on Farms - Unifying Outreach Efforts to Benefit America’s FamiliesThe Family Caregiving, Families Food and Fitness, Just In Time Parenting, and other Human Science-oriented Communities of Practice have initiated an organizational transformation to deliver research-based information to America’s families. No longer working as distinct communities, these once-separate entities have formed a “Learning Network” that functions as a single administrative unit. The new structure offers a fresh paradigm for internal CoP operations, leverages shrinking resources, maximizes human capital, and advances opportunities for delivery of content and interactions with end-users. As eXtension’s optimization process was a catalyst for the formation of the Learning Network, foundational principles are representative of those set forth in the optimization plan. Crucial to the decision to undertake this strategic shift was a shared belief that a streamlined organizational composition would result in a regeneration of interest and commitment to the delivery of family-related resources and information across the nation. This session will include: 1) an outline of the rationale for undertaking this radical transformation, 2) the evolutionary process as it unfolded, 3) lessons learned to date, and 4) an engaged discussion regarding the possible applicability for other CoPs with complementary subject matter content.Andrew Crocker10/3/20129:45:0045EgbertNo

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The Extension Educator's Role as 21st Century Platform BuildersSocial media adoption is critical to Cooperative Extension’s future but only to the degree that it helps us cultivate another critical understanding: our role platform architects and builders of the 21st century. We, as Extension educators, must learn the significance of platforms beyond their more widely understood role as the basis for additional web and software innovation. How well we learn to develop the most open, generative platforms – or, to put it another way, the most optimal learning environments – of the 21st century will determine our success or failure as an educational movement. These platforms will be measured by how effectively we empower our clients to share ideas and to work together collaboratively.Jim Langcuster10/3/201210:45:0045Meeting Room 1No

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Using Xtranormal to Create Educational Online VideosThis workshop will describe use of Xtranormal (http://www.xtranormal.com/) to create educational videos. While eXtension has used Second Life to create content for years, there is one major drawback of this virtual world platform. The only audience for Second Life educational content is people who use Second Life. Undoubtedly, many creative eXtension programs are unable to be viewed by many people. Enter Xtranormal as an alternative method to teach content that can accessed with the click of a mouse. Once Xtranormal videos are published, they can be placed on Web sites, in Moodle courses, or publicized via social media. Xtranormal uses avatars but, unlike Second Life, does not require users to log in and learn how to navigate a Web site. Rather, students are simply sent a link. Content developers select characters, voices, gestures, and settings and type text that their characters say. Basic features are free but, like many Web sites, content developers must buy points to do more. The presenter has used Xtranormal to create staff training videos as part of a financial education project with the New York Public Library. The videos segue into a group discussion. Below are two sample links:
Identity theft: http://www.xtranormal.com/watch/13324217/money-matters-identity-theft-nypl
Retirement Planning: http://www.xtranormal.com/watch/13433323/nypl-retirement-jerry-your-money
Barbara O'Neill10/3/201210:45:0045Meeting Room 2Yeshttp://connect.extension.iastate.edu/learn

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Increase Your Audience with High-quality WebinarseXtension contributors and Cooperative Extension folks across the country are increasingly using webinars as an efficient education tool to reach and engage the public. Representatives from three CoPs will offer lessons learned, best practices, and help you think about how to improve your webinars or get a great start if you’ve not tried webinars for the public. The panel will address these basic questions and more: What 3 roles are vital to create a successful webinar? What are the goals of your webinars? What is your content strategy? How do you promote your webinars? How do you evaluate your webinars?Lynette Spicer10/3/201210:45:0045Meeting Room 3No

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Promoting Agro forestry Practices for Limited Resource Small Farmers and Woodland Owners in North Carolina Limited resource small farmers and woodland owners (SFWOs) in the south are plagued with problems that affect their efforts to compete. Many SFWOs lack farming and forestry training, making their land less productive. The purpose of this study is to: advance the public’s knowledge for agriculture and the environment; support economic opportunities for rural America; and train Extension educators to train farmers how to protect the environment. The overall goal is to encourage SFWOs to adopt the use of agroforestry practices to enhance their economic stability and better manage their natural resources. The activities being carried out to meet the goals include: developing an agroforestry curriculum; b) establishing demonstration sites to teach agroforestry; and c) strengthening partnerships with local, state and federal entities. The project partners with a local Cooperative Extension office and secondary agriculture teachers and their students to educate them on the use and benefits of agroforestry. There are three farmers currently receiving training. The preliminary findings: SFWOs are receptive to learning and implementing agroforestry practices to better their operations. The researchers will continue to deliver involve more stakeholders and educate secondary and postsecondary students about the benefits of studying food and agricultural sciences and natural resources.Joshua Idassi10/3/201210:45:0045Meeting Room 4No

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Technical Assistance to Improve the Quality of Child Care in Mississippi The objective of this proposal is to discuss the quality improvement outcomes of the technical assistance program within the Mississippi Child Care Resource and Referral Network (MSCCR&R Network). The program reaches early care and education providers in licensed facilities across the state. The technical assistance is based on the Environment Rating Scales, The Creative Curriculum, the Mississippi Early Learning Guidelines, and lessons tailored to the teacher’s needs. A technical assistance coordinator serves as a mentor and role model, provides lessons, helps arrange the classroom, and demonstrates teaching techniques to participants enrolled in the program. Each classroom received a minimum of 30 hours of technical assistance. Pre and post ratings from the Environment Rating Scales were used to evaluate program impact. The analysis revealed improvements in quality of care for both the ITERS-R and ECERS-R classrooms. Increases in all subscale scores were observed for both types of classrooms except for personal care routines in the ECERS-R classrooms. The results show that technical assistance can be used as a means to improve the quality of child care. This research format can be used across disciplines for educational workshops, after school programs and other Extension outreach programs to determine quality improvements or knowledge gained.Julie Sims10/3/201210:45:0045BiltmoreNo

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Join the Popular Crowd in Social Media and Be “Liked”, “Talked About” and “Shared”!Extension has always been the face of the land grant university. Our clients expect science based, non-biased answers delivered in an understandable way. How do we translate this easy communication and trust into the daunting world of social media? How do we condense the vast amount of valuable information and research into 140 characters or less, perhaps accompanied by a picture or video that is interesting enough so that people will view it, use it, and tell others about it? Extension specialists at Michigan State University have been working with various forms of social media through eXtension HorseQuest, My Horse University, Equine Business Network and Michigan Equine News. While some of our attempts have been more successful than others, we have stumbled on a formula that seems to resonate with our audience, even generating some international recognition for our efforts. In this session, we will demonstrate what has and hasn’t worked with our Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and blogging efforts as well as the metrics we use to measure our success. We will encourage discussions about the value of entertainment, educational and event posts, along with other issues that arise in the world of social media.Christine Skelly10/3/201210:45:0045EgbertNo

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Use of ICT in Danish Extension ActivitiesTo overcome high costs and strong environmental regulations, Danish farmers must produce using best methods and knowledge available. A unique two-layer advisory system including 31 local advisory centres and a common Knowledge Centre for Agriculture helps them fulfilling this. ICT has since 1997 played an ever-increasing crucial role in this system in dissemination of information and offering of online services. Primarily targeting advisors, the information database www.LandbrugsInfo.dk with +50.000 articles covering all aspects of farming functions as a library and a as an accelerator of new knowledge. All 3.500 employees in the advisory system use LandbrugsInfo and many of them visit LandbrugsInfo several times each day. For farmers, the portal www.landmand.dk offers personalized information and services including access to farm specific data and e-documents from to example dairies and feed stuff companies. Approx. 25.000 out of 35.000 Danish farmers are active users of Landmand.dk. All local advisory centres have their own web sites. Most of these sites and a number of other farming related sites including Farmers Weekly, is running on a common CMS developed by the Knowledge Centre. This ensures a cost-effective solution; re-use of information and single sign on for users.Jens Peter Hansen10/3/201210:45:0045Meeting Room 5No

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Creating National Presence and Local Value: Perspectives from the Cooperatives CoP One of the major benefits of eXtension is to provide a central location for peer-reviewed, research based material. The system seamlessly delivers information across state and even national boundaries. However, these boundaries do impact the development and sustainability of a COP. The content providers of a COP and their supporting institutions are driven by the stakeholder relationships and budgets at the state level. While newly developed COPs extend information to new areas and new clientele, the participating specialists and their administrators are required to document state level impacts. Enhancing the value at the state and local level is a key determinant of the long-run sustainability of a COP. The Cooperatives COP faced these issues as it worked to develop a national resource on the cooperative business model. This session will feature a diverse panel representing leaders from the COP, state extension administration and the cooperative industry. The panel will provide their perception on the value of the COP and the balance of national presence and local impacts. Specific strategies to create state and local value including linkages with multi-state research projects, webinars, and industry partnerships will be highlighted. The panel will stimulate discussion of a critical area of COP success.Paul Kenkel10/3/201214:00:0045Meeting Room 1Yeshttp://connect.extension.iastate.edu/learn

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Living On the Land Publications and PodcastsExtension and agency personnel in the Mid-Columbia area of Oregon and Washington teamed to create a series of educational resources for new and small acreage landowners. The goal was to create high quality, concise and appealing materials with application to a variety of new and small agricultural enterprises. The publications in the “Living on the Land” series are short, use simple language, are easy to read, and include tables and high-quality photos. The first publication, “Pasture and Livestock Essentials”, was developed in 2010, followed by “Winter Livestock Care” and “Managing Manure”. “Attracting Birds of Prey for Rodent Control” and “Spring Pasture Essentials” are in production. OSU Extension and Experiment Station Communications Department personnel suggested turning these publications into podcasts for increased accessibility by the target audience. Consequently, each publication has been divided into three podcast sessions. Since publication, podcasts in the series have been downloaded 13,378 times and the pdfs have been downloaded 1,022 times; viewers are from 12 different countries. Publications in the series have won a variety of competitive national communication awards. The “Living on the Land” series resources can be accessed at http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/details.php?search=living+on+the+landSusan Kerr, Brian Tuck10/3/201214:00:0045Meeting Room 2No

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Using Adobe Connect and a Set of Resources Program delivery using web conferencing is a cost effective and efficient way to reach an audience that is diverse in location and content. This presentation will focus on using the ISU Extension and Outreach Adobe Connect that supplies support for the eXtension and Military Families communities. The presentation will include best practices for participants, presenters and coordinators of webinars. Steps for a successful webinar, tips for your PowerPoint, using video, testing options for presenters and participants will be some of the items that will be covered. The presentation will also discuss requesting webinar time and options for webinars offered through ISU Extension and Outreach. In addition, resources discussed will be available at a website for easy future reference.Jeanne Wiebke10/3/201214:00:0045Meeting Room 3No

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Professional Development for Early Childhood and School Age Providers through Extension: What Exists and How Might We Use it More Effectively?Have you ever wondered what other states are doing in regards to professional development for early childhood and school age providers? Have you wondered what professional development programming exists through Extension on topics such as nutrition, physical activity, science, brain development, or parenting? Have you thought that surely there must be a program that already exists to teach providers how to (fill in the blank)? If you answered yes to any of these questions, this presentation is for you! Presenters will share results from their 2011 nationwide environmental scan of professional development offered through Extension. The purpose of the environmental scan was to discover what professional development was being offered through Extension to early childhood or school age providers across the nation. A secondary focus was to assess the availability of professional development opportunities for providers who served children (birth-12) from military families, both on and off installation. The presentation will highlight strengths, areas of need, differences between groups (early childhood vs. school age), and share recommendations. You’re invited to join the conversation and help figure out how this information can be used to strengthen what states are already doing and the impact it might have on the national context.Jennifer Gerdes10/3/201214:00:0045Meeting Room 4No

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Clearwater County Idaho Sixth Grade Forestry Tour Assessment: Tracking the Change in Students' Knowledge and AttitudesThe University of Idaho Extension has organized a Sixth Grade Forestry Tour in Clearwater County, Idaho for the last 51 years. During 2012, the program was evaluated to examine knowledge gained and retained by students in Clearwater County and track changes in behavior and attitudes about natural resources, and general satisfaction with the program’s logistics, staff, and facilities. All sixth grade students at Clearwater County schools were given a pretest in the spring consisting of questions about their knowledge of natural resources and their attitudes and behaviors towards natural resources. They were also asked to draw a picture of themselves in the forest. Students who attended the three-day tour were given the same test on the last day of the tour. A delayed posttest was given in the fall to all previously tested students, now beginning the seventh grade. Clearwater County students who did not attend the three-day tour served as the control group. The pre/posttest experimental design approach was used to determine the beginning knowledge of students, the knowledge gained as well as retained, and the attitude/behavioral changes which could be attributed to program attendance as opposed to maturity. Results from the evaluation will be shared during the presentation.Jillian Moroney10/3/201214:00:0045BiltmoreNo

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Social Media Building Blocks and Breadcrumbs: Two Case Studies and a Discussion About the Potential of Personal Connections in Social MediaTo many, social media is just another mass media outlet. And yes, it can be a very effective way of sharing our information with a wide audience. But social media also provides unique opportunities to join conversations, develop relationships, and discover mutually beneficial connections with people that could not happen any other way. In the process, social media becomes more valuable to our professional goals and more satisfying as an integral part of our work. Using two case studies, this session will examine: 1) the value of making personal connections through social media in light of your work, 2) where and how personal connections can be initiated and nurtured, and 3) how personal connections help redefine social media successes.Kathy Reschke10/3/201214:00:0045EgbertNo

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Maximizing Programs and Services Without Breaking Our Backs: Satisfy the Growing Demands of Gardeners Ravenous for Up-to-Date Gardening InformationWith reduced budgets/staff and increased programmatic responsibilities, how do Educators maximize limited time and resources to meet the growing demands of the gardening public? The Michigan State University Extension Educator team was faced with the daunting task of delivering science-based, environmentally sound information to a potential 8+ million gardeners. Using technology as the main thread for success, the innovative solution weaves together new educational products, services, delivery systems, and collaborations. The team launched the Gardening in Michigan website as a platform to offer online classes/resources. The Ask-an-Expert widget is used along with a statewide, toll-free Lawn and Garden Hotline staffed with highly trained Master Gardeners (MG) allowing residents 24/7 access to gardening experts. The team also created a comprehensive home lawn and garden soil test kit complete with postage-paid return envelope and is linked to the interactive MSU Soil Test website providing customized electronically-delivered fertilizer recommendations and access to additional resources. The MG Program was redesigned to reduce volunteer management time and create a statewide, easy-to-replicate program integrating a hybrid in-person/electronic delivery method. This presentation highlights successes of this suite of widely accessible gardening resources that are cross-marketed/promoted; allowing Educators to meet clients’ needs without being spread too thin.

Mary Wilson10/3/201214:00:0045Meeting Room 5No

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eXtension Funding and Partnerships – Focus on the FutureCultivating new, and enhancing existing partnerships to increase revenue and private support for eXtension and its Communities of Practice takes considerable time, know-how and patience. The competition for charitable dollars is fierce and the non-profit quest for corporate sponsorships is steadily increasing at all levels. This session will provide insights into the proven strategies currently being put in place for eXtension – America’s Research-based Learning Network™. Learn what steps are being taken in order to improve eXtension’s chances for success in identifying and partnering with corporations and charitable foundations. Learn about the eXtension Foundation National Leadership Council – a group of Extension leaders and private corporate and charitable foundation executives who are working together to cultivate eXtension partnerships at the national level. Join us as we talk about working smarter with a greater vision.Bob Lewis10/3/201215:00:0045Meeting Room 1Yeshttp://connect.extension.iastate.edu/learn

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Appropriate Technology and its Design: Extension in honey bees integrates NIFA and ARS projects with beekeeper's participationThe Bee Health CoP consists of a number of Research and Extension groups organized around various associations including grant programs and research topics. Online forms of education are developed for the specific tasks of each project. A ‘one size fits all’ approach is avoided. Bee Health at eXtension provides some grounding of these groups to a central URL and a Content Manager whom provides technical and/or marketing support to a number of these projects. A WordPress blog (beeinformed.org) has been developed to disseminate survey reports from a SQL database. The survey relates > 5,000 beekeepers’ management practices with colony survivorship. The blog is also a forum for crop protection agents and other project participants to provide educational updates from the field. In this presentation, the Bee Health content manager will review the design of this blog and a number of other unique aspects of the Bee Health CoP where the logistics, especially the layout and chosen technology, is key to delivering content to and from beekeepers.Michael Wilson10/3/201215:00:0045Meeting Room 2No

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Nebraska Extension takes youth livestock Quality Assurance (QA) program to the next level by making it available on eXtension through MoodleIn 2012 Nebraska Extension made the state required youth livestock Quality Assurance (QA) available online through an eXtension Moodle course. In the past the requirement was fulfilled through face-to-face trainings and did not account for the ages of the learners or preferred learning style. The new course is broken down by three age groupings, Junior (9-10), Intermediate (11-14), and Senior (15-18), to better accommodate the various levels of learners. In addition, the learning modules were designed to appeal to various learning preferences of the youth. Youth can now read the information, watch a PowerPoint and read the slides, listen to a voice over of the presentation, watch a video, and/or even fill in a questionnaire after they interview their veterinarian. Annually, each youth is required to complete three different modules, and in theory will never repeat the same module for that age grouping. The number of youth who have completed at least one module exceeded this team’s expectations (n=1,820). Overall, the program has received very positive feedback. The youth enjoy being able to get online to complete this state requirement at home and at their convenience. The team plans to expand modules available for the 2013 year.Lindsay Chichester10/3/201215:00:0045Meeting Room 3No

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Reaching Beyond eXtension to Inform Extension Programming DecisionsIntended application of survey results may stretch or even leap-frog when the results are so provocative that initial thoughts on boundaries of utility suggest an undercutting of potential use in a larger context. The Financial Security for All (FSA) Community of Practice (CoP) launched a survey (http://bit.ly/qG0IG5) for educators and the general public from November 2011 to April 2012 (n=726). The goal of the survey was to determine topics for the CoP to prioritize in articles, projects, and grant applications. Results showed some interesting geographic variations across regions of the United States and within certain individual states that perhaps is appropriate to inform Extension programming beyond eXtension.org. While our “local” consideration is normally the online environment, free of geographic boundaries, when we look at correlations among survey answers and location of the respondents, we can conceivably impart some needs assessment knowledge to boots-on-the-ground Extension Educators and Administrators.Megan O'Neil10/3/201215:00:0045Meeting Room 4No

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CoP Evaluation EffortsThis panel session will highlight the evaluation work of two CoPs: eOrganic and Military Families. Alex Stone will discuss evaluation efforts with eOrganic and Sarah Baughman will discuss evaluation efforts with Military Families.Michael Lambur10/3/201215:00:0045BiltmoreNo

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Taking Your Event Social: Using Social Media to Promote the Priester National Extension Health ConferenceJoin us for an informative session on how we used social media to promote the Priester National Extension Health Conference before, during and after he event. And learn how you can use social media to extend the reach of your event exponentially!Marissa Stone10/3/201215:00:0045EgbertNo

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Is Your CoP Keeping Secrets?Have you ever heard anyone say, “Extension is the best-kept secret?” We’ve all heard it, and we’ve all said it, for decades. And audience research has shown it to be true. In the national Extension brand study, non-clients indicated little awareness of Extension, but, when exposed to a description of Extension, most wondered why they hadn’t heard of Extension before, because it sounded valuable. We have never had a national, research-based understanding of what our brand really means. We now have a research-validated message that both captures the core truths about Extension and that clients and potential clients say is accurate and compelling. Extension’s diversity of subject matter is one of our greatest strengths, but it’s also one of the strongest forces fragmenting our brand. You are critically important in building a strong, consistent brand for Extension. In this session, you will learn about the research and the new tools and messages; and you’ll develop messages of your own. We will also develop ideas for promoting the Extension brand through eXtension and the CoPs. If we work smarter, Extension will have a strong, lasting, and inspiring brand among all those we contact—we’ll no longer be the best-kept secret.Elizabeth Gregory North10/3/201215:00:0045Meeting Room 5No

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eXtension's Immersioneers Present: The Winter Safety Simulation Game and the REHAU MONTANA ecosmart house: Two showcase virtual learning environments for Winter 2012This hands-on session takes the group directly into two new Virtual Learning Environments built in Second Life, guided by the immersioneers who created them. The presenters will discuss the pedagogy, process, and desired outcomes for each of the VLEs and will address strategies for educators to utilize the environments to enhance their programs. The session will aim to get all attendees live into Second Life (subject to venue bandwidth) to work in teams to explore these environments and provide feedback to the project developers. Please bring a laptop with the Second Life client installed and an active Second Life account ready for log in if you have one. Newcomers without access to Second Life are encouraged to attend and join by viewing along with one of the hands-on participants. Terry Beaubois, professional architect and Director of Creative Research Lab (CRLab) at Montana State University (MSU) is the creator of a replica of The REHAU MONTANA ecosmart house, a living laboratory for green heating and cooling technologies, located on eXension’s Morrill4 island at the Virtual State Fair. The immersive 3D build mirrors a real-world project located in Bozeman, MT (see http://www.montanaecosmart.com/ ) The Second Life environment extends the reach of the Bozeman project to a global audience who otherwise would not be able to experience a walkthrough of this structure. LuAnn Phillips is the creator of the Winter Safety Simulation Game, located on eXtension’s Bailey island in Second Life. This Virtual Learning Environment served as the basis for her Capstone Project for a Masters Degree in Teaching with Technology from Marlboro College Graduate School in Brattleboro, VT in 2012. A portfolio about the project is located at https://sites.google.com/a/gradschool.marlboro.edu/luann-phillips-capstone/
The project is a full-region guided tour/scavenger hunt with gaming elements and plenty of interactivity. It includes a pre-game area to raise the players level of anxiety, and an optional onboarding area for new users, customized to teach only the skills needed to complete the activity. Dmitre Raposo is eXtension’s 3D content developer, machinimatographer, and simulation manager.
LuAnn Phillips10/3/201216:00:0045Meeting Room 1Yeshttp://connect.extension.iastate.edu/learn

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Fostering Learning Communities for Youth Audiences + Digital Badges and LearningDigital badges are graphic symbols or indicators of an accomplishment, skill, quality or interest. They can be an online record of achievements issued on the basis of work completed to obtain it and used over a lifetime. Digital badges in extension and 4-H can be a motivator for learning across many content areas but also across other communities and institutions. Following Mozilla’s Open Badge Infrastructure, 4-H is developing a means of supporting a badge ecosystem to support learning through 4-H experiences. The basic process includes:
1) A learner identifying an area of interest that can result in a digital badge and then working to complete the learning criteria established for the badge. 2) Typically, there is some form of verification that the criteria have been met for any given badge; programmed observance of completion, review by a certifier or instructor, etc. 3) Submission to the digital badging system requesting a badge issuance 4) Issuance of the badge and placement of the digital image made specific to the individual earning the badge into a portfolio or location that can be seen online and shared with others. Utilization of digital badging and e-portfolios can help extend online courses or learning modules in meeting a growing demand for learning credentials among youth AND adult learners. Digital badges appear to be evolving into a way to issue a digital “credential” to represent knowledge, skills, abilities and capacities of an individual beyond the traditional resume. The FYFL CoP and its learning network is developing the platform to support digital badges in 4-H. Learn more about digital badging and discuss what more can digital badges in eXtension or the land grant system lead to?
John A. (Tony) Cook10/3/201216:00:0045Meeting Room 3No

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Behind Every Number is a StoryThere are a lot of numbers produced in eXtension. I know that when I hear those numbers, I want to know things like “How is that number produced? What exactly is it measuring? What time period does that number reflect? Are there mitigating factors or assumptions that inform that value?” Behind every number is a story. In this session I’ll explore the stories behind the data coming out of the www, create, ask, and other eXtension websites, the technical details of how the numbers are produced, as well as touching on the reasons, rationale, and context behind the numbers. I’ll go beyond ‘reports’ and explore the tools and techniques that tie our data together in ways we haven’t done before, as well as highlight ways to “explore the numbers” in your own communities and institutions.Jason Young10/3/201216:00:0045BiltmoreNo

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Pinterest - Creating CES Outreach in New WaysPinterest is a popular social media site where users “pin” their favorite things to virtual bulletin boards. Pins can be pictures, ideas, text, or links. Pinners can share with each other by following bulletin boards, repinning, and commenting. What is the potential to utilize this tool for outreach and education? What role can CES play as curators of information on Pinterest? This 101 course will teach you the basics of Pinterest, and how to set up and create an educational experience for your traditional AND non-traditional client. Pinterest offers opportunities to highlight your programs and information, and create places where CES shares. Hands on.Amy Hays10/3/201216:00:0045EgbertNo

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Enhancing eXtension Through NIFA Competitive Grant Programs eXtension is seeing an increase in the number of teams wanting to include eXtension in NIFA competitive grant program applications. Most often teams choose to enhance an existing Community of Practice; however, a few choose to establish a new one in a subject matter yet to be represented by eXtension. Regardless of the type of inclusion, the result should lead to a growth in the number of resources and services provided through eXtension. More specifically, it can lead to growth in CoP membership, the addition of new skills and competencies, new content and programs, an increase in audience engagement, more expertise to answer customer questions, and an increase in financial resources to help grow and sustain the CoP.
This session will describe how eXtension inclusions in NIFA competitive grant program applications can truly enhance a CoP in effective and meaningful ways. Learn how CoPs with a record of success approach such partnerships, how they engage partners, and what they require to be included in applications. Please join us to learn how inclusions in NIFA competitive grant programs can lead to real value.
Dan Cotton10/3/201216:00:0045Meeting Room 5No