GIS Data Dictionary - Environmental Activism in Central PA
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Group LayerLayer NameDescriptionMethods Used to Create this Data LayerData ProviderLink to metadata from data providerDownload SitePathway to feature class referenced in map servicePathway to MXD used for publishing map serviceMap service URL
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YBoundariesStudy area countiesThe study area counties selected are Lycoming, Montour, Northumberland, Snyder, and Union. These counties were selected because of proximity to the tire incinerator - all of them have muncipalities in the 20-mile radius of the proposed tire incinerator - and because these counties represented the bulk of social media engagement, change.org and campaign petition signatures. Likewise, these are the counties that drew activists involved in the campaign and where campaign activities took place.created by Morgan GreenlyOutline of area we are interested in; includes Union, Northumberland, and Lycoming countiesNA
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YBoundariesStudy area municipalities (with demographics)Study area municipalities with demographic data from ESRI's 2011-16 estimates and projections datasetSelected municipalities in study area from the ESRI file with demographic data aggregated to municipal level (Course_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.CFY11_01_CS_ClipToStudyArea)ESRIhttps://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1mrTZxmzVPsV-magngV6t3NsgqGwzXL5MvwZCzShej6A/edit?usp=sharingNA
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YGeneral Industrial FacilitiesAirThis layer identifies stationary sources of air pollution. The data is derived from the EPA’s Air Facility System, which is a computer based repository of air pollution information. Identified facilities include but are not limited to electric power plants, steel mills, factories, and universities.Downloaded data in a GIS format from Enviromapper. Clipped data to 5 county study area. Enviro Mapperhttp://www.epa.gov/enviro/facts/qmr.htmlhttp://www.epa.gov/emefdata/em4ef.home
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YGeneral Industrial FacilitiesLandThis layer identifies areas contaminated by improper disposal and handling of hazardous materials. This data is derived from multiple EPA sources which include Biennial Reporting, Brownfields-Cleanups, and Superfund programs. Data is also derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information. The Enviromapper website states that RCRAinfo is collected as hazardous waste generators, transporters, treaters, storers and disposers are required to provide information on their activities to state environmental agencies.Downloaded data in a GIS format from Enviromapper. Clipped data to 5 county study area. Enviro Mapperhttp://www.epa.gov/enviro/facts/qmr.htmlhttp://www.epa.gov/emefdata/em4ef.home
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YGeneral Industrial FacilitiesToxicsThis layer identifies facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of over 650 toxic chemicals in amounts above established levels which pose a threat to human health and the environment. This data is submitted to the EPA by facilities and is compiled annually.Downloaded data in a GIS format from Enviromapper. Clipped data to 5 county study area. Enviro Mapperhttp://www.epa.gov/enviro/facts/qmr.htmlhttp://www.epa.gov/emefdata/em4ef.home
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YGeneral Industrial FacilitiesWasteThis layer identifies large quantity generators of hazardous waste, which include treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This data is derived from multiple EPA sources which include Biennial Reporting, Brownfields-Cleanups, and Superfund programs. Data is also derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information. The Enviromapper website states that RCRAinfo is collected as hazardous waste generators, transporters, treaters, storers and disposers are required to provide information on their activities to state environmental agencies.Downloaded data in a GIS format from Enviromapper. Clipped data to 5 county study area. Enviro Mapperhttp://www.epa.gov/enviro/facts/qmr.htmlhttp://www.epa.gov/emefdata/em4ef.home
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YGeneral Industrial FacilitiesWaterThis layer identifies facilities that have been issued permits to discharge wastewater into rivers. According to the Enviromapper website this data is based on The Permit Compliance System and Integrated Compliance Information System, which both provide information based on issued wastewater permits.Downloaded data in a GIS format from Enviromapper. Clipped data to 5 county study area. Enviro Mapperhttp://www.epa.gov/enviro/facts/qmr.htmlhttp://www.epa.gov/emefdata/em4ef.home
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YGeneral Industrial FacilitiesPA TDF IncineratorsThis layer identifies the locations of all past, present, and currently proposed facilities in Pennsylvania which incinerate tires. These are not just the 100% TDF (tire derived fuel) facilities, but any which include tires in their materials for incineration.Started with list of facilities by city, state and then did research to come up with approximate street locations for TDF incinerators. Used various of research to come up with approximate street/geographic locations. created by Morgan Greenly; developed from data on Energy Justice Network; Google Maps coordinateshttp://www.energyjustice.net/tires/burnershttp://www.energyjustice.net/tires/burnersCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.GeneralIndustrialFacilities_TireDerivedFuelIncinerators
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YLocations of incineratorsProposed Tire Incinerator, 2012-12 (National Gypsum Co Site)This is the location of the proposal 100% tire derived fuel (TDF) facility that Emmanual Tires was going to build to provide energy for the National Gypsum Plant on Natl. Gypsum's factory property in White Deer Township. This factory is near the intersection of Route 15 and I-80.Looked up National Gypsum Ltd. site, where proposed tire incinerator would have been built. Identified latitude/longitude and mapped that point location (Morgan G.).Stop the Tire Burner websiteLocation of National Gypsum Co's White Deer, PA location (intended home of the tire incinerator)http://www.stopthetireburner.com/#!pictures/ctjnCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.IncineratorLocations_ProposedIncinerator_NationalGypsumCompanySite
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YLocations of incineratorsProposed Trash Incinerator, 1980s-1990s (Susquehanna Industrial Park Site)This is the location of the proposed trash incinerator - the Susquehanna Industrial Park - that was going to be built by Environmental Management Services Inc. in Allenwood, Gregg Township Union County in the early 1990s. There was a concerted local campaign organized to defeat these plans, which was successful. Here is a Philadelphia Inquirer article about the proposed trash incinerator and the campaign against it: http://articles.philly.com/1991-08-18/news/25805298_1_incinerator-site-hazardous-waste-incinerator-gregg-township.Looked up news stories describing the location of where proposed trash incinerator would have been built (and confirmed through interviews with activists who worked on this issue.) Identified latitude/longitude and mapped that point location (Morgan G.).created by Morgan GreenlyLocation of proposed trash incinerator from the 80s-90s, across from the Allenwood landfillNACourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.IncineratorLocations_ProposedIncinerator_SusquehannaIndustrialParkSite
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YMarcellus Shale & Natural Gas InfrastructureFacilities Receiving Waste from Unconventional Wells from Jan 2012 to Jun 2014This layer identifies locations that received waste from unconventional wells. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Oil and Gas website unconventional wells are defined as, “bore hole(s) drilled or being drilled for the purpose of or to be used for the production of natural gas from an unconventional formation.” Downloaded .csv tables from PA Oil and Gas Reporting Page with location and attribute information for all facilities in PA receiving waste from unconventional wells during the following time periods: Jan-June 2012 (n=5,743), Jul-Dec 2012 (n=10,457), Jan-Jun2013 (n=8,875), Jul-Dec 2013 (n=10,820) and Jan-Jun 2014 (n=9,684). The .csv tables were added to ArcGIS and mapped using the 'add x, y' data tool. After creating an events layer using the 'add x, y' tool, we selected only the subset of records for which there was a facility lat/long and exported those features to a new feature class. This process resulted in 5 separate map layers with a combined total of 45,579 mapped features. The waste facility reports have one record per 'well sending waste' - thus, there are many more records in the tables than there are actual facilities receiving waste. Since most of the locations were duplicates (i.e. they received waste in several of the time periods mapped), we took steps to de-dup the data to create a single map layer showing the locations of each unique facility to receive unconventional waste between Jan 2012-Jun 2014. In order to create the de-duped layer, we used the ArcGIS 'Merge (data management)' tool to combine the 5 separate map layers into 1 single layer. Next, we made a copy of the merged layer to use for the de-duping process. The tool used to de-dup overwrites the input file - so we made a copy of the input file in order to keep a record of the merged file that was used for this operation. Next, we used the 'Delete Identical (data management)' tool to remove duplicate features at the same location. The resulting feature class has 170 unique features. Please note that all attribute fields were turned off except for the following: waste facility permit ID, waste facility name, facility address 1, facility address 2, facility city, facility state, facility zip, facility phone, facility latitude and facility longitude. There is a 1:M relationship between the map layer with locations for the 170 waste-receiving facilities and the original .csv tables with records on individual instances of waste disposal. Once the waste facility locations were de-duped, the only attribute fields that were still valid were the ones that listed the facility name, ID and location information. PA Oil and Gas Reporting Sitehttps://docs.google.com/a/bucknell.edu/document/d/1kiCdSES6-3Ink3w1_VZlZsefvOeuVIaqkz-lS_5e37w/edithttps://www.paoilandgasreporting.state.pa.us/publicreports/Modules/DataExports/DataExports.aspxCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.MarcellusShaleNatGasInfra_FacilitiesReceivingWasteFromUnconventionalWells_UniqueLocations_Jan2012toJun2014
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YMarcellus Shale & Natural Gas InfrastructureUnconventional Wells - Jan 2000 to Jun 2014This layer represents the location of unconventional wells drilled from January 2000 to June 2014. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Oil and Gas website unconventional wells are defined as, “bore hole(s) drilled or being drilled for the purpose of or to be used for the production of natural gas from an unconventional formation.”Downloaded .csv tables from PA Oil and Gas Reporting Page with location and attribute information for oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania. For the following time periods, the .csv tables included data for all oil and gas wells (conventional and unconventional): Jan-Dec 2000, Jan-Dec 2001, Jan-Dec 2002, Jan-Dec 2003, Jan-Dec 2004, Jan-Dec 2005, Jan-Dec 2006, Jan-Dec 2007, Jan-Dec 2008, Jan2009-Jun2010. For the following time periods, the .csv tables included data for only unconventional wells: Jul-Dec 2010, Jan-Jun 2011, Jul-Dec 2011, Jan-Jun 2012, Jul-Dec 2012, Jan-Jun 2013, Jul-Dec 2013, Jan-Jun 2014. All .csv tables were added to ArcGIS and mapped using the 'add x, y' data tool. This process resulted in 18 separate map layers. The 10 layers for the years Jan 200-Jun 2010 were merged to form a single layer. All unconventional wells were selected out of this layer and exported to a new layer. This new layer (with data on unconventional wells from Jan 2000 to Jun 2010) was merged with the layers with data on unconventional wells for the time periods Jul 2010 through Jun 2014 to create a single layer with well locations cover Jan 2000 to Jun 2014. Finally, this layer was de-duped using the 'delete identical' tool. PA Oil and Gas Reporting Sitehttps://docs.google.com/a/bucknell.edu/document/d/1kiCdSES6-3Ink3w1_VZlZsefvOeuVIaqkz-lS_5e37w/edithttps://www.paoilandgasreporting.state.pa.us/publicreports/Modules/DataExports/DataExports.aspxCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.MarcellusShaleNatGasInfra_UnconventionalGasWells_UniqueLocations_Jan2000toJun2014
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YMarcellus Shale & Natural Gas InfrastructureMarcellus Shale ExtentThis layer represents the extent of the Marcellus Shale formation. The data was created by the Pennsylvania Geologic Survey.Downloaded data in a GIS format from PADCNR websitePADCNRNAhttp://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/topogeo/econresource/oilandgas/marcellus/marcellus_maps/index.htmCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.MarcellusShaleNatGasInfra_MarcellusShaleExtentPA
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YProtest Campaign Materials & Social MediaEuclidean distance buffers from the proposed tire incineratorThis map was created by Ben Marsh for the Stop the Tire Burner (STB) campaign. It was used in PowerPoint presentations at regular meetings and public events. It also was reproduced for campaign flyers and distributed widely. The map with wind distance became a feature image on the STB Facebook page and website. It is both useful as an analytical tool to understand wind distance regarding air pollution and tire fire risk but also the ways in which risk was portrayed to the public.Prof. Marsh used the ArcGIS desktop buffer tool to create multiple, concentric buffer rings around the proposed tire incinerator. The ArcGIS buffer tool uses Euclidean distance to generate buffers. Euclidean distance, or straight-line distance, is measured "as the crow flies." Prof. Marsh specified buffer ring intervals of 1mi through 15mi around the proposed tire incinerator location. This layer presents one view of the potential 'impact area' around the proposed tire burner site. created by Ben MarshLines to show buffer around proposed tire burner for 1 mile, 2 miles, 3 miles, and so on.NACourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.CampaignMaterials_DistanceFromProposedTireIncinerator_EuclideanBuffers
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YProtest Campaign Materials & Social MediaWind distance from the proposed tire incinerator This map was created by Ben Marsh for the Stop the Tire Burner (STB) campaign. It was used in PowerPoint presentations at regular meetings and public events. It also was reproduced for campaign flyers and distributed widely. The map with wind distance became a feature image on the STB Facebook page and website. It is both useful as an analytical tool to understand wind distance regarding air pollution and tire fire risk but also the ways in which risk was portrayed to the public.Prof. Marsh used NOAA wind velocity and direction records to calculate the average wind velocity and transport time in 16 compass points around the proposed tire incinerator location. This was then used to create a generalized picture of how far and in what direction wind could travel from the proposed tire burner in 10 minutes, 20 minutes or 30 minutes time. This layer presents one view of the potential 'impact area' around the proposed tire burner site. created by Ben MarshThree lines showing where the wind would blow emissions from the tire burner in 10, 20, and 30 minutesNACourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.CampaignMaterials_DistanceFromProposedTireIncinerator_WindBuffers
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YProtest Campaign Materials & Social MediaSchools in Study Areacreated by Ben MarshLocations of local schools who are within the tire burner area of impactNACourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.CampaignMaterials_Schools
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YProtest Campaign Materials & Social MediaPrint PetitionProf. Wooden's research team created a dataset of all indiviuals who signed the print petition distributed by the "Stop the Tire Burner"(STB) team. This dataset was begun by members of the STB team to count all petition signatures and remove double counted ones. There were a large number of print petitions that were signed at the end of the campaign that the STB team collected but did not add to the dataset which Prof. Wooden's research team then added from the physical/print petitions. Then an ID was created for each individual and names were removed to keep this information confidential. The locations were geocoded to town, to remove street addresses which would identify individuals, again to maintain confidentiality. Geocoded records to town centroid using ArcGIS Online 'World Geocode Service' address locator (1133 of 1133 records in table were geocoded when we used ArcMap vs. 1091 of 1094 records when geocoding the same table in ArcGIS Online*). created by Janine Glathar; developed from data collected by the Stop the Tire Burner teamLocations of those who signed the print petitionNACourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.CampaignMaterials_PrintPetitionSignatures
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YProtest Campaign Materials & Social MediaOnline Change.org PetitionProf. Wooden's research team got access to the list of individuals who signed the online change.org petition distributed by the "Stop the Tire Burner"(STB) team (same text as the print petition but in an online format). Double signatures (invididuals signing twice) were removed. Then an ID was created for each individual and names were removed to keep this information confidential. Individual's locations were geocoded to the town where they live (as they reported it) to remove street addresses which would identify individuals, again to maintain confidentiality. Geocoded records to town centroid using ArcGIS Online 'World Geocode Service' address locator (1250 of 1250 records in table were geocoded when we used ArcMap vs. 1248 of 1250 records when geocoding the same table in ArcGIS Online*).created by Janine Glathar; developed from data collected by the Stop the Tire Burner teamLocations of those who signed the Change.org petition. NACourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.CampaignMaterials_ChangeOrgPetitionSignatures
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YProtest Campaign Materials & Social MediaChange.org CommentsProf. Wooden's research team got access (from change.org) to the list of individuals who posted comments when they signed the online change.org petition distributed by the "Stop the Tire Burner"(STB) team (same text as the print petition but in an online format). An ID was created for each individual and names were removed to keep this information confidential. Individual's locations were geocoded to the town where they live (as they reported it) to remove street addresses which would identify individuals, again to maintain confidentiality. Geocoded records to town centroid using ArcGIS Online 'World Geocode Service' address locator (338 of 338 records in table were geocoded whe nwe used ArcMap vs. 337 of 338 records when geocoding the same table in ArcGIS Online*)created by Janine Glathar; developed from data collected by the Stop the Tire Burner teamLocations of those who made a comment on the Change.org petition NACourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.CampaignMaterials_ChangeOrgComments
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YProtest Campaign Materials & Social MediaFacebook Likes & SharesProf. Wooden's research team created a dataset of all 'likes' and 'shares' of posts and comments on the "Stop the Tire Burner"(STB) Facebook page. Each individual liking a post or comment was identified by the location they listed as their current residence or hometown. Then an ID was created for each individual like and share and names removed to keep this information confidential. As the location of these likes & shares is by municipality, no address is identifiable. Geocoded records to municipality centroid - i.e. the geographic center point of the municipality - using ArcGIS Online 'World Geocode Service' address locator (965 of 965 records in table were geocoded when we used ArcMap vs. 904 of 965 records when geocoding the same table in ArcGIS Online*)created by Janine Glathar; developed from data collected by the Stop the Tire Burner teamLocations of those who liked and/or shared the Stop the Tire Burner Facebook pageNACourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.CampaignMaterials_FacebookLikes
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N2014 Interviews & SurveysActivists InterviewedThis is a layer showing the hometowns of the activists we (Prof Wooden's research team) interviewed in Summer-Fall 2014, who were involved in the "Stop the Tire Burner" campaign group. This helps us see the geographical distribution of the campaign leadership and most active campaign participants.Locations of activist interviewees
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N2014 Interviews & SurveysPilot Survey 1 (Incinerator)Prof. Wooden's research team conducted several 'pilot surveys' to test survey question designs and gain a better understanding of community members' views. The team conducted these non-random, anonymous surveys at several farmers' markets in Lewisburg over two days in August, asking all passersby to take the survey (worked in a team of two); the answers were recording on iPads. This Pilot Survey 1 which took 3-5 mintues to answer focused on questions about the tire incinerator - knowledge, position, activism, reactions. Individual IDs for each survey participant were automatically generated. No names were recorded. Hometown/place where the participant lives was recorded during the survey and will be used to geocode location for each participant.Location of those who took one of our pilot survey
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N2014 Interviews & SurveysPilot Survey 2 (Fracking)Prof. Wooden's research team conducted several 'pilot surveys' to test survey question designs and gain a better understanding of community members' views. The team conducted these non-random, anonymous surveys at several farmers' markets in Lewisburg over two days in August, asking all passersby to take the survey (worked in a team of two); the answers were recording on iPads. This Pilot Survey 2 which took 3-5 mintues to answer focused on questions about hydraulic fracturing - knowledge, position, activism, reactions. Individual IDs for each survey participant were automatically generated. No names were recorded. Hometown/place where the participant lives was recorded during the survey and will be used to geocode location for each participant.Location of those who took one of our pilot survey
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N2014 Interviews & SurveysPilot Survey 3 (Identity)Prof. Wooden's research team conducted several 'pilot surveys' to test survey question designs and gain a better understanding of community members' views. The team conducted these non-random, anonymous surveys at several farmers' markets in Lewisburg over two days in August, asking all passersby to take the survey (worked in a team of two); the answers were recording on iPads. This Pilot Survey 3 which took 3-5 mintues to answer focused on questions about identity, place, and patriotism. Individual IDs for each survey participant were automatically generated. No names were recorded. Hometown/place where the participant lives was recorded during the survey and will be used to geocode location for each participant.
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N2014 Interviews & SurveysClimate Protester Survey (Fracking & Identity)Prof. Wooden's research team and students from ENST302 Fall 2014 conducted this informal, anonymous survey of participants in the Sept. 21st People's Climate March in NYC. The non-random selection process was participants in Group 2 of the march (Colleges/Students, Elders, Families, Labor) near the Bucknell group. They sought to identify participants who expressed (verbally or with signs carried or tshirts/paraphenalia worn) either an anti-fracking or potentially pro-drilling stance. They also sought to speak to participants who varied by age, gender, ethnicity. The survey questions were about positions and activism on "fracking" and identity questions (place and patriotism).Individual IDs for each survey participant were automatically generated. No names were recorded. Hometown/place where the participant lives was recorded during the survey and will be used to geocode location for each participant.
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N2014 Interviews & SurveysPublic Opinion SurveyThis layer will be compiled after Oct. 30th from a randomized phone-survey of 600 individuals in the study area - all municipalities within a 20-mile radius of the proposed tire-incinerator location will be sampled, proportionate to population.Individual IDs for each survey participant will be automatically generated. Names and addresses where the participant lives comes from the sample database. The postal addresses and names will be removed to maintain confidentiality. Location will be geocoded to street but not address.Location of those who took one of our pilot survey
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N2014 Interviews & SurveysActivist SurveyThis layer will be compiled in November 2014 from the results of a survey about the incinerator, fracking, & identity to be sent to all participants in the Stop the Tire Burner campaign (a population of 100+ individuals). Individual IDs for each survey participant will be automatically generated. No names were recorded. Hometown/place where the participant lives was recorded during the survey and will be used to geocode location for each participant.
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NAvailable as map service Study area outlineThe study area for this project is five counties: Lycoming, Montour, Northumberland, Snyder, and Union.
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NAvailable as map service Study area municipalitiesThese are all the municipalities in the five study area counties: Lycoming, Montour, Northumberland, Snyder, and Unioncreated by Morgan Greenly; developed from data on PASDAOutline of the PA municpalities that we have selected to focus onNA
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NAvailable as map service Gas CompressorsDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_GasCompressors
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NAvailable as map service Gas Holding Company Service TerritoriesDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_GasHoldingCoServiceTerritories
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NAvailable as map service Gas HubsDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_GasHubs
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NAvailable as map service Gas PipelinesDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_GasPipelines
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NAvailable as map service Gas Processing PlantsDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_GasProcessingPlants
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NAvailable as map service Gas Production RegionsDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_GasProductionRegions
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NAvailable as map service Gas Receipt Delivery PointsDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_GasReceiptDeliveryPoints
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NAvailable as map service Gas Service ProvidersDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_GasServiceProviders
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NAvailable as map service Gas Storage FacilitiesDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_GasStorageFacilities
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NAvailable as map service LDC TerritoriesDownloaded data in a GIS format from Platt's subscriber FTP sitePLATTSSubscriber FTP siteCourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_LDCTerritories
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NAvailable as map service National Oil & Gas Well LocationsNational Oil & Gas Well Locations as of February 2014Downloaded data in a GIS format from FracTrackerFracTrackerhttp://www.fractracker.org/downloads/us-oil-and-gas-wells-february-2014/http://www.fractracker.org/downloads/Course_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.NaturalGasInfrastructure_OilGasWellsUS
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NProtest Campaign Materials & Social MediaFacebook CommentsProf. Wooden's research team created a dataset of all 'posts' and 'comments' on the "Stop the Tire Burner"(STB) Facebook page. Each individual post or comment was identified by the location the commenter listed as their current residence or hometown. Then an ID was created for each individual like and share and names removed to keep this information confidential. As the location of these likes & shares is by town, no address is identifiable. There is an available dataset with the hyperlinks to the actual Facebook comments, which then could be used to identify individuals if the comment is searched - so these hyperlinks and the text of comments have been removed for this online map in order to maintain confidentiality. Geocoded records to town centroid using ArcGIS Online 'World Geocode Service' address locator (83 of 83 records in table were geocoded when we used ArcMap, AND 83 of 83 records in table were geocoded using the same table in ArcGIS Online*)created by Janine Glathar; developed from data collected by the Stop the Tire Burner teamLocations of those who made comments on the Stop the Tire Burner Facebook pageNACourse_ENST302_ResDesign.JLG046.CampaignMaterials_FacebookComments
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*We used the ArcGIS Online-geocoded version of the data in the class map for 2 reasons: (1) the only way to get the embed code and large blocks of text used in the Facebook Likes, Facebook Comments and Change.org Comments layers to appear in the pop-ups was to geocode in ArcGIS Online as the columns with code and large blocks of text were incompatible with desktop data format; and (2) there is an issue with the map services created for the campaign material point layers that makes it impossible to add the 'layer URL' map service - only the 'data frame URL' map service works. The 'data frame URL' version of the map service cannot be moved to the top of the table of contents in the ArcGIS Online map - so it's essentially not very useful.
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Download Table Details_PA Oil & Gas Reporting Page