Argument Writing Grade Level Learning Progressions Rubrics
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

View only
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST
1
Name __________________________________Class/Pd _______Date ______________
2
Brooklyn Collaborative Learning Progression: Argument Writing Rubric for Grade 6
3
Beginning 65Competent 75Accomplished 85Exemplary 95
4
Performance IndicatorCommon Core Learning StandardLearning Target (General Topic)4567
5
Viewpoint: Thesis/ClaimW- 1A ThesisIncludes a topic for writing.Includes a clear topic for writing.Includes a claim that shows a basic interpretation of a text or topic.Includes a claim that shows arguable interpretation of the text or topic.
6
IntroductionIntroduction presents topic.Introduction presents clear topic.Introduction presents thesis.Introduction presents thesis in an engaging manner.
7
Evidence and SourcesW - 1B, W - 2B, W - 10.9, W - 10.8Argument and EvidenceIncludes examples and information to support reasons (from a text, his/her knowledge, or his/her life). Includes evidence such as facts, examples, quotations, micro-stories, and information to support claim.Used trusted sources and information from experts and gives the sources credit. Provides quotes and paraphrase examples from the text. Some evidence may be repetitive or irrelevant.Consistently incorporates and cites trustworthy sources. Evidence of previous descriptor AND students' evidence is mostly quotes rather than summary. Most evidence is relevant and directly related to the thesis.
8
Analysis and PersuasionW-1B, W-2C, W-2FExplanation and Analysis of EvidenceArgument is supported with reasons. (Reasons are considered a logical statement on why the student has the argument; evidence is specific to outside sources)Argument is supported with reasons and evidence.Argument is supported with evidence and evidence is explained.Argument is supported with evidence for claim and counterclaim, all evidence is explained.
9
Effective OrganizationW-1A, W-1C, W-1E, W-2A, W-2C, W-2FOrganizationSeparates sections of information using paragraphs.Groups information and related ideas into paragraphs. Puts the parts of the writing in the order that most suits the purpose and helps prove the reasons and claim.Organizes arguments into sections. Arranges reasons and evidence purposefully, leading readers from one claim or reason to another.The order of the sections and the internal structure of each section make sense.Organizes arguments into sections. Arranges reasons and evidence purposefully, leading readers from one claim or reason to another. Uses topic sentences, transitions, and formatting (where appropriate) to clarify the structure of the piece and to highlight the main points.
10
Understanding of Implications and ContextW-1B, W-2DImplications and ContextConclusion connects to the topic.Conclusion discusses other people, places or eras that are connected to topic.Arguments and ideas reflect the ability to make connections with other historical events or a current situation. Conclusion discusses other people, places or eras that are connected to topic.Arguments and ideas reflect the ability to make connections with other historical events and a current situation. Conclusion discusses other people, places or eras that are connected to topic.
11
Strong, Engaged Student VoiceW-1DVoiceIntends a convincing tone through precise details, facts and evidence to best support points. Intends word choices
to draw readers into a line of of thought by repeating words that make the reader feel emotions.
Intends word choices to have an effect on the reader. Reachs for precise phrases, metaphors, or images that best convey ideas. Makes choices about how to
angle evidence to support the points. Tried to use a scholarly voice and varies sentences to create pace and tone in the different sections of the piece.
Intends words carefully to support the argument and to have an effect on the reader. Works to include concrete details, comparisons, and/or images to convey ideas, build the argument, and keep the reader engaged. When necessary, explains terms to the reader, providing definitions, context clues or parenthetical explanations. Makes the piece sound serious.Intends words purposefully to affect meaning and tone. Chooses precise words and uses metaphors, images, or comparisons to explain what is meant. Includes domain-specific, technical vocabulary relevant to the argument and audience and defines these terms when appropriate. Uses a formal tone, varying the tone when appropriate to engage the reader.
12
Conventions (for writing task only)W-1C, W-4D, W-2EConventionsFrequently spells simple words incorrectly, although reader can still understand the meaning. Features simple end punctuation (e.g, period, questions mark, exclamation point) that is correct, but internal punctuation (e.g., comma, apostrophe, semicolon) is often missing or wrong. Has capitalization that shows frequent errors except for proper nouns and sentence beginnings. Relies heavily on conversational oral language that results in inappropriate grammar/usage; errors sometimes distract the reader. Usually uses correct or reasonable phonetic spelling for common grade-level words; may be innaccurate with more complex words. Uses correct end punctuation with only minor errors; contains internal punctuation that is usually correct. Uses correct capitalization in most cases. Employs proper grammar/usage fairly consistently; problems are not serious enough to distort meaning or distract the reader.Correctly spells most common grade-level words and often more difficult words. Has punctuation that is almost always correct and guides reader through the piece. Includes correct capitalization consistently. Includes correct gramma/usage; shows few grammar mistakes and has meaning that is clear.Has mostly correct spelling, even for more difficult words; includes occasional errors that do not detract from overall quality. Includes punctuation that enhances readability; may use creative punctuation when appropriate. Includes capitalization consistently and may employ more sophisticated capitalization for effect. Uses correct grammar that contributes to clarity and style; enhances meaning by sophisticated grammar/usage.
13
Presentation (for oral component only)S.L. 9-10.4, S.L. 9-0.6Oral PresentationNeither clear nor appropriate
presentation to audience; cannot
respond well to questions; does
not present accurate or
substantive ideas or information; student should re-present for greater evidence of mastery if time permits
Communicates clearly in appropriate way to audience; able to respond accurately to questions; presents some substantive ideas and information accuratelyCommunicates clearly in appropriate and original way to audience; able to respond to questions and expand somewhat on ideas; presents accurate, substantive ideas and information clearlyCommunicates ideas clearly in appropriate, sophisticated, and original way to audience; able to respond to questions and expand on ideas; presents complex, accurate, substantive ideas and information clearly
14
Overall Mastery Level
15
Comments
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...